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Archive through May 01, 2004

 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 627
Registered: Dec-03
Thanks to admin for this welcome new Home Audio category "DVD-Audio & SACD".

Recent, related threads under other categories.

Twilight of the Compact Disc
DVD-Audio
NAD T533 DVD/CD player user's review, and DVD-Audio
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 107
Registered: Dec-03
hear hear!

i posted a suggestion about 5 days ago for a
media catagory and never got a response.

this is close enough!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 629
Registered: Dec-03
KEGGER,

Thanks. I think a "media" category is a good idea, too.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 110
Registered: Dec-03
i would like to post an interesting question.

this is for anyone who may want to chime in!


if you had to list 1 of each these things below
as something you would suggest for someone to see
or hear or do. what would it be?

these could be life changing or just good media
whatever you want. and don't be afraid to put the
same thing as someone else because if enough
people put the same thing it might make people
who would normally not pay attention to it think
twice and say well maybe i should give that a try

movie
musical
music
place to visit
something to do
favorite sport
best thing to check out on media
something else i have not mentioned

anyways just play with it see what you think!
maybe we all can learn something from others to
broaden our horizons so to speak.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 121
Registered: Feb-04
Kegger,

That's an excellent question worthy of its own thread. Since I call myself Two Cents I'll be the first to throw in my $0.02, actually some random recommendations:

The album that made the greatest impression on me is Van Morrison's "Astral Weeks". Get the album, listen to it and listen to it again and again and then read the Lester Bangs article on the album (the greatest piece of rock journalism EVER).

Watching the movie "Rushmore" always puts me in a great mood. Go rent it RIGHT NOW!

This past Christmas I attended a modern dance performance of the Nutcracker (Mark Morris' "The Hard Nut") I thought I would hate it because the only other modern dance performance I attended was deathly boring, but I absolutely loved it. It had some magic moments, which I would've missed if I didn't agree to go with my girlfriend. So go to the ballet.

Go to the opera. Maybe start with some lighter fare like Rossini. Or instead of watching a DVD of a musical, go see a live performance. The last one I saw was "Mamma Mia" with an all-ABBA score. Very fun.

And since it's Stanley Cup time, living and dying with the Red Wings (currently dying).

After 39 years of living I have to keep reminding myself to continue trying new things and keeping an open mind. I think it's this attitude that's important for everyone, not necessarily specific experiences. How 'bout you?
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 157
Registered: Feb-04
Kegger and Co

I seconded your motion Kegger to have a media thread and received an email from the administrator that he is working on it as we speak.

It's a great idea and will give us all an area to compare our thoughts on various media and open our eyes and ears to things we may think have never been of interest.

Two Cents

Ballet? Yes I have had that experience. Before we were married, my wife was a dancer in the Queensland Ballet Company and Queensland Contempory Dance Company. So, unwillingly at first, I have shared your experience often. Modern dance I can enjoy, but with the classics I am not a great fan.
 

Silver Member
Username: Rick_b

New york Usa

Post Number: 129
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents,

Super post. Some thoughts of my own, if I may.

Always enjoyed Van Morrison. I have a lifelong friend who use to be his lead guitarist, but that's another story, for another time.

See the movie "Tender Mercies". A true obscure masterpiece IMHO.

Always loved the opera. We should all support the performing arts, in some form and way. There is nothing better than the magic of a great live performance.

I'm a long suffering Rangers fan again.

Live, learn, and share your knowledge and experiences with others.

With age comes experience, and hopefully on to wisdom.

Cheers to all!
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 112
Registered: Dec-03
good stuff guy's.

i have a couple friends over were going to watch kill bill.

when i get a chance i will put in my "2 cents"

by the way 2 cents are you in michigan you wings
fan as i am dying with the wings also?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 634
Registered: Dec-03
Kegger,

You are asking for personal things. It's a great idea, and I will respond. But I look over my shoulder for "trolls".

You guys probably don't know, but there is very long-running BBC radio weekly show called "Desert Island Discs", where some person (all sorts; from rap artists to world statesmen) is invited to name the 8 "gramophone records" (it's been going since the 40s I think and originally this meant 78s) they would choose to take with them "if cast alone on a desert island". It always makes you think. Some of the things people choose are a real eye opener, even if you can't stand the guy or gal. I cannot get over the present Archbishop of Canterbury (for goodness sake) choosing for one of his records The Incredible String Band, some weeks ago.

It's tough call. Here goes. I assume we get one each. Can I have a back-up?

movie "Il Nuevo Cinema Paradiso" is a movie about making movies, like "Singin in the Rain" it got an oscar in about 1990. Having said that, If they pack the complete Lord of the Rings (extended editions) in one box, it would be hard to resist. Maybe that's cheating. 'Course you would need a really good system...

musical West Wide Story

music Vaughan Williams Sea Symphony (real performance, or, almost as good, the recent DVD-Audio on Naxos) (back up Dylan "The Times are a changin" or Beatles "Sgt Pepper" back up the Beethoven complete String Quartets; I can't stop this one... Wife and I both have our lists ready for Desert Island Discs)

place to visit The Australian Gt barrier reef

something to do Too vague, sorry! There are some obvious things...

favorite sport Rugby football

best thing to check out on media "pass" on this.

something else i have not mentioned You can only go so far on this forum.... Playing/performing music with friends is something everyone should try, at least once, in whatever way, at whatever level, imho.

Kegger, you have to chip in, too!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 635
Registered: Dec-03
Just in case anyone wants to argue about the "twilight of the CD", and I was expecting/hoping for fierce criticism, may be we should make this the first on the new topic/category, and call it "Kegger's list" or similar?
 

Jan Vigne
Unregistered guest
Learn a new language. I don't think anything opens up as many possibilties as that one improvement in your thought process.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 639
Registered: Dec-03
Jan,

I have heard that and I am sure it is a good idea. One problem, if you start from English, is: which one?
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 113
Registered: Dec-03
i am sorry john i did not mean to step on your
post.

i didn't actually realize what it was until now
my bad!

and i didn't think my post deserved to be in this
room on it's own.

so i put it where we could all see it.

i noticed though you suggested for me to chip in
so i will take it that it is allright with you
that we continue.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 114
Registered: Dec-03
allright as some of you may know i am a very
simple/straightforward kind of person.

and am not as well read nor do i know much of the
liturary arts as some of you.(and can't spell)

so my list is probably going to vary from most,
but that is what this post was meant as gathering
ideas from others.

i would rather not put a comedy as my favorite or
a great movie but i can't help myself but to
mention CADDY SHACK as the movie if you haven't
seen please see it.

musicals i just don't know much about them.

as i was younger i could not get enough of AC/DC
their concerts are so full of energy and rythim
if you get a chance before they brake up you may
want to check them out.

i still enjoy listening to AC/DC but i find that
i now choose to listen to music that is more umm
open i guess.if your ever going to listen to the
police make sure you check out Zenyatta Mondatta
a fantastic album.also tracy chapman crossroads.

if anyone has one of those outback resteraunts
near you and you haven't been.check it out.
make sure you get the kukabura wings and the
gold coast coconut shrimp.(not to mention a fosters or two)

american footbal is my favorite sport i'm sure
having played it has something to do with it.
hockey is a close second.

on of the coolest things i've seen on media yet
is that mario andretti thing i think it's called
speedway.

and if you haven't played a multiplayer video
game on the pc with at least 8 people shooting
each other you havn't lived.whether it is the
competition or just being around some good friends or having a few cold ones.

their is also not much like the adrenalin rush
of being outside in the snow hunting and see
your target coming and making that shot.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 641
Registered: Dec-03
KEEGER,

I did not mean, at all, any complaint. These threads go where the posters want. You had a great idea and it's much better to follow it. I was only thinking about people searching this forum, clicking on "The twilight of the CD...?" and finding us guys having a good time talking about interesting but unrealted things. Really, I put that first post in only as some links that anyone searching under "DVD-Audio & SACD" might be interested in.

Yours are great addition to "Kegger's list". My Rantz should know all about gold coast coconut shrimp. I am making a list of movies recommended here and have added Caddy shack. Never heard of it before - but neither had I heard of 2c's or Rick's suggestions. Thanks!

So, be my guest! Any other suggestions?
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 115
Registered: Dec-03
oh yah caddy shack is an excelent comedy!

look it up online and see who's in it.

a very interesting cast.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 158
Registered: Feb-04
Kegger

"make sure you get the kukabura wings and the
gold coast coconut shrimp.(not to mention a fosters or two)"

My bet is the Kookaburra wings are chicken wings otherwise the Animals Rights Groups here would be up in arms over the slaughter of these magnificent birds. Also, I guess there are some here on the coast who might dip a prawn or two in coconut, but I'll take a garlic prawn anyday!

And we use shrimp for bait! Ah You Americans :-)

Caddy Shack - the snickers bar in the pool scene! Now that was a laugh.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 123
Registered: Feb-04
Kegger,

I grew up around Ann Arbor so I was raised a Red Wings fan. I'm in Northern California now, but my allegiance is still with the Wings.

Rick,

I feel for you, buddy. One of my college roomies was/is a long-suffering Rangers fan. Someday you'll have to share a story or two about your friend who played with Van the Man. I know there are a lot of Van fans on this board.

My Rantz,

So you're from Australia? Isn't that the country west of New Zealand, where they filmed Lord of the Rings? Just ribbing you :-) It's good to know I'm not alone in the experience of being dragged to dance performances. It's not so bad, is it, especially when accompanied by good company?

John A

Always interested in your recommendations. As I mentioned in another thread, I picked up Vaughn Williams' Sea Symphony at your recommendation.

All,

Hope you continue to share your experiences and recommendations. Love the spirit of this thread.
 

Silver Member
Username: Rick_b

New york Usa

Post Number: 133
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents,

Thank you, sir!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 644
Registered: Dec-03
2c,

I've posted on the other thread. Hope you like old RVW. Consider he was writing that in 1909, same time as Mahler. There couldn't be a greater contrast in vision, imho, or even music. Consider it also as an early Anglo-American cooperation ("shoulder to shoulder" as we now say...)
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 116
Registered: Dec-03
yo rantz i'm sure they don't do it like they do
in australia but i'm telling you those wings and
the shrimp from the outback resteraunt are truly
amazing.

seriuosly if you get a chance try them.

i'm not ranting it's just my mouth is watering
just thinking about them.

it's the only resteraunt i want to go out to
anymore it's that good.

i would love to go to australia and try a real
fosters not an import.dam that sounds good too
now i'm thirsty! ssshhheeeessh!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 50
Registered: Dec-03
Fosters is the Gobel of Austrailia. You can find much better beer than that down under.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 118
Registered: Dec-03
i have no dought about that but hear in the
states my favorite beer just happens to be fosters.

so i would imagine it would taste better there.

just like when i get labatts in michigan if i go
to canada and get one it is quite different.

 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 412
Registered: Dec-03
In numerous cities in the US there are many micro-breweries and some make wonderful small quantities of great fresh ale, lager, pilsen, and other beer-style beverages.

As far as pale ales in the US, it is tough to beat a fresh keg of Sierra Nevada, or freshly bottled, if you can find that.

Years ago while travelling throughout Europe playing cello in an orchestra one of the great quaffs I had was fresh Pilsner Urquell on tap. I think this brewery in Pilzen (Czech Republic) is the oldest operating brewery in the world--and the originator of all pilsen-style beers. Anyway, it was a wonderful golden medium malty brew with a nice bitter hops bite.

Most major American beers hardly have any flavor.

But it is true that many cd's sound better when drinking beer :-)
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 119
Registered: Dec-03
good to hear from you greg, thought you might be
able to put some contribution in hear.

i hope thiers more!

yes i have a tough time finding american beers i
want to drink (that is to enjoy) anyways.

one that i use to love but is no longer made was
strohs signature.

i like beer with flavor but i am not a fan of the
really heavy bears.i know many people like guiness.

but it is just to heavy for my taste.

probably about the best american beer that i like
would be micholob.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 162
Registered: Feb-04
Boutique breweries are popping up here in Aus as well, but I always like the regular XXXX (4X). Nowdays, in keeping the waist under control (battling) I have the occassional Hans Premium Lite - one of the few that doesn't have that watered down flavour.

But Friday nights are our music nights and bourbon and (diet) coke surely make the cd's sound warm and mellow. Of course the Marantz helps too!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 647
Registered: Dec-03
Gregory, Kegger,

Bottled Pilsner Urquell is exported everywhere, extremely good, and worth trying if anyone sees it on sale and doesn't know. The Czechs are beer fanatics and have the highest beer consumption in the World, I forget the exact figure. I too heard they invented Pilsner, and that is the basic type of beer in most places in the World today.
Whilst in US I confess I couldn't adapt to freezing cold big-name beers but they tasted much worse if allowed to warm up, I thought. But then I also got to know one or two locally-produced beers. There was one I remember called San Francisco Anchor Steam Beer that was long established, good, and a "live" beer (meaning yeast still in the bottle). The draught beers from US micobreweries were mostly excellent, at least to my taste. Or, if not, at least "interesting"....

There we go again, of course: everyone's taste is different. It's what you're used to, what pleases you. And you remember tastes for many years, without having to be reminded, so the associations and memories they call up are important, too, and can surprise you. So that's like music, as I am sure has been said many times. I could give many examples from my own experience, I'm sure each one of us could.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 120
Registered: Dec-03
i don't know about you guys but i am getting a
lot of enjoyment from this thread.

pretty much anything goes.

john,

i definatley agree with you, beer and music/audio
are very much a matter of ones preference.(to each thier own)

and geogrophy has a major factor.

i will have to find some of these brews to try.

if anyone has any inclinations of building a bar
in thier basement or wherever, a friend of mine
came up with a pretty novel idea.

he took beer caps and layed them out next to each
other about 6 foot by 2 foot with a 1/2 edge around it.
then filled it with a clear epoxy it looks awsome.
and it was fun trying all the different kinds of beers to get assorted caps.

 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 165
Registered: Feb-04
Keggar

I think everyone is enjoying this. It was a great idea and I hope they get the media section up soon as I have a few thoughts for it.

They have an ad on TV here about sheds. They show one fellow with 10,000 beer cans in his shed. It sure makes one wonder!
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 126
Registered: Feb-04
Always happy to contribute to a discussion on beer:

I strongly second John A's recommendation of Pilsner Urquell and Anchor Steam, considered a local beer here, but available nationally. In fact, California has a number of fantastic small breweries, including Sierra Nevada as My Rantz mentioned. I'd be drinking more beer if there weren't such good wines as well around here:-)

Kegger, in your neck of the woods, you should seek out beers from Bell's Brewery based in Kalamazoo. They make some wonderful stuff. With your name, it's appropriate that the topic has turned to beer.

I won't even get into the imports. I for one have a fondness for British ales...

Cheers!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 651
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents,

"I for one have a fondness for British ales... " please don't start me or I'll never stop! They are about the only non-Pilsners (though there is nothing wrong with good Pilsner-type beers). The yeast ferments away floating on top, not at the bottom, of the batch, and sinks down when it has finished. It works best at room temperature, and that is why Brits drink "warm beer".

Ralph Vaughan Williams (his first name was pronounced "Rafe", by the way) would have known some things about beer. He was a guy who got on his bike and dropped into pubs a lot, sitting round a table, and standing his round. After closing time he'd cycle home and write down folk songs he'd heard in the pub. All sorts; he was especially good with sea shanties. You will hear them, also other sorts of folk tunes, in the Sea Symphony.

RVW was also trying to get away from "Vienna and all that" (the complete opposite of Elgar, also a great composer, but who took Bruckner and Brahms and gave as good as he got). RVW is like an English couterpart of Bela Bartok, who was doing the same in Hungary: trying to get back to writing great music still accessible and intelligible to ordinary folk.

I believe RVW would gladly have joined us, with Kegger, for a few pints, wouldn't pull rank, would have had something to say sometimes, but would also "listen and learn".

You may find the Sea Symphony takes few listenings. He wrote it partly to give the amatuers in the choirs a good sing, I think. Some of the choruses must be wonderful to be in, and are probably not too difficult.

Still no discs from Aix. I won't forget to let you know. Apart from anything else, I am looking forward to the test disc.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 414
Registered: Dec-03
Years ago, when touring with an orchestra, I stayed with a family in Chelmsford, England. Took me awhile to get used to room temperature brews. Drinking Guiness was more like eating a meal. But when cut with Bass Ale (to make a black and tan) it was pretty good. And it was nice honing my dart skills:-)

I remember vividly taking an overnight cruise from Harwich, England to Copenhagen (Kobenhavn) to play a concert. The fluorescent plankton kicked up by the ships propeller were amazing to watch in the cold North Sea water. And the large amount of young people that go to classical concerts throughout Europe is a striking difference to most haunts in America. Often after a concert, mostly college age kids would talk to me afterwards and take me out for a meal and some brews. One sweet blonde-haired Danish girl took me home to meet her folks. That kind of contact would never happen in the US, except for some people that would just stop by and talk to you after the concert. Although I am sure that some of the European friendliness was fired by my being somewhat exotic (American)and them being interested in that. But I think it also is quite cultural and they certainly seem to hold classical music in far higher esteem than most in the USA.

During summer concerts the Europeans loved it when we played Sousa marches. They would go banana's. Nothing like playing a Sibelius symphony in Sweden and finishing up with 2 or 3 of Sousa's big hits to get the crowd in a jubilant mood.

I remember playing a Mahler symphony in Munich (Munchen) and some girls and guys took me to a great beer drinking festival afterwards. Guys and girls arms wrapped around my shoulders and swaying back and forth while drinking huge pints and listening to German folk and oompah music. An interesting experience to be in Bavaria for a non-religious jewish kid from NYC:-)
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 655
Registered: Dec-03
Great, Gregory!

English and Welsh beers were never intended to accompany food; they are for drinking.

Surely you enjoyed Willson's take on Sousa marches in "The Music Man"?

Such a lot to follow on from what you wrote.

The view of "classical" music as something only for the elderly or the refined is total nonsense, as I am sure you will agree. Where does it come from?

In London there is a season of "Promenade Concerts" every summer, centred on the Albert Hall. They get the best orchestras in the world, anything goes as long as it is worth listening to, and the average age in the audience must be twenty something. As a student I once heard, there, Sir Adrian Boult conducting the BBC Symphony Orchestra (I think) in Vaughan Williams Symphony 5. Its ends with a sort of fading sadness that can wrap up 5,000 people. After about a minute's silence, the applause started slowly, swelled up, and they (we) wouldn't let him leave the stage (Proms audiences can go completely berserk if they like something).

He tapped the stand with his trademark baton, seemed about 3 ft long. Total silence. You could hear a pin drop. You could almost hear the single thought. How do you follow that? I was close enough to see the twinkle in his eye. He had the encore all planned. "The Dam Busters" March, a piece of light orchestral stuff, "pop" of a kind, by Eric Coates, and a recognisable radio theme tune of the day. Audience went berserk. Unforgettable.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 173
Registered: Feb-04
Gregory

I knew I should have learnt to play the cello!

It's wonderful sometimes where some things lead.

All

On the concert topic but with a twist. We went to a marvellous Dire Straits concert in Brisbane too many years ago and though a friend who was promotion manager with a radio station, we got to go to the party after. Mark Knoffler sat down beside me and we got to talking over a couple of coldies. I virtually listened to his life story even though there was a couple of lingering and ready beauties hovering for his attention.

Then, I almost got into real trouble . . .

John Isley, entered into our group, dripping perspiration from the performance workout. After intros I said to him, "John, you really look stuffed!" The look made me shudder. As my friends laughed I quickly told him that stuffed was an Oz term for worn out. He said it meant something bl--dy well different where he came from!

Now that was unforgettable!


 

Silver Member
Username: Rick_b

New york Usa

Post Number: 137
Registered: Dec-03
JohnA.,

Isn't all music after Mozart, redundant anyway?
LOL!
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 417
Registered: Dec-03
John A.---

I didn't mean I was drinking Guiness and eating. I wasn't. I meant that Guiness is so heavy it felt like a meal.

I have played a number of Vaughan Williams and Benjamin Britten pieces. Britten's "Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra" is often a favorite and a good way for young people to familiarize themselves with the sound of orchestral instruments in an entertaining fashion. Which, of course, is what Benjamin Britten wanted to accomplish. Even people that don't understand or appreciate classical music normally like that piece.

Now when I play bass or regular guitar in a rock band, young people have no problem understanding and appreciating that. In America, most parents do not introduce their kids to classical music--hence it is like listening to Greek when they get older (as a rule). Heck, most American parents aren't acquainted with classical music either.

Most Americans aren't even familiar with our own composers, except they might recognize some excerpts from Copland's Appalachian Spring and Grofe's "Rodeo" and Gershwin's "American in Paris". Maybe some Duke Ellington orchestral work, but I doubt it. And if they recognized it, they probably would have no idea who wrote it, with the exception of Sousa marches which they hear every July 4th.

My Rantz-- I have some Dire Straits cd's. I always enjoyed Mark Knopfler's guitar work and his quasi-Dylanesque voice with a British accent:-)

The slang used in America, England, and in "Oz" can get one in trouble. What means one thing in one place can mean something totally different elsewhere.

Heck, I remember offending a black guy in college by saying-"Boy, it's hot in here". His response was an angry-"Don't call me boy". My jaw dropped as I was incredulous that he was unaware of the expression and it was not a denigrating term. But then again, often when you are looking to be offended, you will be.

Just as some people's shyness will be interpreted by others as arrogance or they just don't like me. Similarly, one of the dangers of e-mail to people that don't know you--there is no face or inflection and often they can't tell if the comment is a joke or serious.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 52
Registered: Dec-03
Most Americans couldn't name a song by Television or Jeff Buckley and that is a shame.

Personally I would rather have ice picks jammed in my eyes than listen to classical music or watch musicals (except for Yellow Submarine). I grew up being dragged to see, maybe, the finest orchestra in the world: The Cleveland Orchestra and for eighteen years and it did nothing for me. It was a personal decision not to like it.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 124
Registered: Dec-03
hey as we have said ben not everyone has the same
taste.at least you are honest with your decsision

do you have any media suggestions or other to add?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 53
Registered: Dec-03
Everybody should own a Pavement Album, "Grace" by Jeff Buckley, and "Heartbreaker" by Ryan Adams.

Everybody should watch "Run Lola Run", "Apacolypse Now Redux", and "They Royal Tennenbaums" on DVD.

Reccomanded SACD - Allison Krause & Union Station Live

Recommanded LP - "The Modern Lovers"

Everybody should have seen the "Grateful Dead" in concert.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 418
Registered: Dec-03
Heck, if everyone liked the same things it would be a boring world.

But I have both early Television albums: They were a great band both lyrically and musically. The First album "Marquee Moon" had a bunch of great songs and the Second "Adventure" with the great song "Glory" (great guitar interplay between Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd, among other wonderful cuts. I have another cd of theirs, but I never really digested that one, probably because it was made over a decade after they disbanded. Now I am motivated (since you mentioned them) to give it a serious listening. Gives new meaning to having a night of Television:-) Being from NYC and living for 3 years in the Gramercy Park section (near CBGB's) I used to see Television, Talking Heads, Blondie, and numerous other late 70's bands just starting out. It was a great time for rock music--probably the most fertile time since the 60's.

There have been great rock albums since, but no period since the late 70's had as many great bands breaking within 2-3 years of each other. From The Clash, Elvis Costello, Blondie, Television, Talking Heads, Graham Parker (Squeazing Out Sparks was a great album), The Police, The B-52's (albeit, more fun than serious--but great anyway), some may include The Cure, some may also include Joy Division/New Order.

Of course there was AC/DC for the basic rock fan.

And I also have the late lamented Jeff Buckley Glory album. He had a great voice and did a wonderful, and IMHO the best rendition of Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah", among some of his own songs, such as Glory. Such a shame he drowned--terrible loss of a great voice and talent. Must be good genes, his father Tim had an amazing tenor too and he died of a drug overdose in the early 70's. Tim Buckley made a number of great albums that weren't widely appreciated, or listened to. I think I have about 3 of his albums-Happy Sad, Goodbye and Hello, and probably the one that sold the best--Greetings From L.A., with that great picture postcard of smog-ridden Los Angeles on the cover.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 126
Registered: Dec-03
hey if you guys have any info well appreciated.
i have a post in the preamp section that i would
love to get some feedback on.

thanks a lot in advance!

good stuff hear guy's!


 

Silver Member
Username: Rick_b

New york Usa

Post Number: 139
Registered: Dec-03
Gregory,

You mention of Tim Buckley made me think of another American original.... Tom Waits.

I had the pleasure of seeing him on many occasions. Just Tom, a stool, acoustic guitar, and bottle of Jack Daniels. Great memories.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 174
Registered: Feb-04
Gregory

"Stop Making Sense"

We still watch this DVD often. Phsyco Killer Byrne in the giant suit kills me. He a real performer but I'm sure he has help with a 'few tracks' Great concert!

I just don't know how rock degenerated into long-bummed artists spewing violence, p0rn and drugs against monotonous drum beats and claiming musical prowess. Maybe I sound like my father!

Ben

I know we're all different, but "The Royal Tennenbaums!"

I guess we shouln't have turned it off after ten minutes :-)
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 419
Registered: Dec-03
Rick--

Tom Waits is certainly an original. I like some of his music, but generally find it more interesting than pleasant or great. He has done some good acting.

Tim Buckley had a great tenor voice with amazing range and very good songwriting ability, as did his son Jeff, except Jeff didn't have the opportubity to create the body of work that his dad accomplished.

Tom Waits has more of a gravelly, smokey, novelty voice. He is like an archetype intelligent, bowery bum-type, that has an interesting off-handed and bohemian-style performance.

"The Royal Tenenbaum's" is one of those black comedies that one either gets and plugs into, or it just turns them off or just plainly annoys.

 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 665
Registered: Dec-03
Probably black humour does not travel well. I am with My Rantz on the Tennenbaums. The other sort has "Snatch" and "Beautiful Creatures". Loved those, but can see how they could easily seem absurd and boring. Sometimes it takes a while for the penny to drop. I still haven't got it with Pirates of the Caribbean, but my family members were rolling around at that one, so I'll have to give it another shot.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 129
Registered: Feb-04
There are some great recommendations here guys. I have to weigh in on the "The Royal Tenenbaums," because I just watched it last night. (I happen to own the DVD, so you know where I stand.) Wes Anderson is one of the most original American directors today. But I think that originality also appeals to a small, ardent audience.

I read a story about how he drove across country to screen his first feature film Bottle Rocket for the great New Yorker film critic, Pauline Kael, who was a hero of his. He was all excited about giving her a personal, pre-release screening of the film. After she watched the film, she turned to him and said, "I don't get it." Apparently she HATED the film. Oh well. Some of us do like his movies. His best so far is Rushmore IMHO.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 422
Registered: Dec-03
My favorite fairly young auteur director named Anderson, is Paul Thomas Anderson. Although I did enjoy Wes Anderson's-Rushmore very much. Paul directed Magnolia, Boogie Nights, and the rarely seen but excellent, Hard Eight (called by the director "Sydney"). He often uses John C. Reilly and Philip Seymour Hoffman, two great character actors, in his films.

I found Pirates of the Caribbean to be mediocre, but with nice performances by Johnny Depp and Geoffrey Rush, who looked like they were having a great time "chewing up" the scenery. The problem I found with the movie is that I ultimately didn't care what happened to anyone--probably because the script was far weaker than the special effects. Special effects can be great spicing in a movie, but to me they never take the place of a good story that is well told and written.

A good example of that is the last George Lucas film, Star Wars, Attack of the Clones. The special effects were great, but they were often just vomitted up on the screen like a Jackson Pollack painting. There was zero chemistry between the young Vader and Natalie Portman, who's an excellent young actress, but looked very uncomfortable with the awful script.

It seems like after the first two Star Wars movies, each succeeeding movie has gotten more childish and accompanied by a worse script. Each succeeding movie seems to appeal to an ever younger audience. Pretty soon you'll have to be a fetus to enjoy them:-)
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 129
Registered: Dec-03
i lke paul thomas anderson to, but did you know
he started out directing adult movies and a lot of them.

kinda makes sense when you see boogie nights and
kinda ironic with the plot of the movie at the
same time.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 675
Registered: Dec-03
Thanks, guys.

Not caring one way or another what happended to anybody was my main problem with the Matrix. Added to the absurd, spray-on, non-science and pseudo-philosophical ****.

On a more serious movie, The Pianist, we all approached it recently, expecting a story. I think if we'd known it was essentially a narrative with no real plot or resolution then it would have been better. Lots to talk about and reflect on in that one, and you could argue that superimposing some sort of fictional story line on events like that just cheapens and exploits.

If I wanted to get really solemn I would argue the Star Wars was actually a harmful movie. The message was that might triumphs, especially if some mystical agency happens to be on your side.

Perhaps I'm getting old, and too serious!

If you want chemistry between characters, and a story, watch Casablanca. Or Twelve Angry Men.

May the Force be with you.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 180
Registered: Feb-04
Good stuff all!

I must admit that I'll watch a movie based on the fact that there will be great special effects especially with sound. If it's a very good production, the storyline, the script, the chemistry between actors and the quality of acting need not stand up to scrutiny.

But to watch the same again will be somewhat boring. I do like a good story and quality acting!

I think all Star Wars movies are somewhat childish but agree with Gregory that the earlier ones had more adult appeal. The sound effects in the desert race scene was outstanding.

I enjoyed "Pirates" mainly because of Depp and Rush. The story was trite, typically grating Bruckenheimer sountrack, effects well done and picking Keith Richards characteristics in Depps performance helped to entertain. Masters & Commanders is released here this week and I can hardly wait.

But what I want is a well acted movie, with a great original storyline, great visual and sound effects; something that can earn the title of "Thoroughly engrossing entertainment." Though not produced by Bruckenheimer

Does anybody know one?
 

Bronze Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 72
Registered: Feb-04
My Rantz:
A very good question. I'll have to think about that one a couple days. Seems like you can have all the big bang you want for showing off the home theater, but those movies are ultimately as involving as drinking one of our Bud Lite beers. It comes, it goes, and it's forgotten.

One movie I can't forget is David Lynch's "The Straight Story." I'm not a fan of Mr. Lynch, but this one's an exception--precisely because the picture is so atypical for him. It's his most 'straight' movie. It is not a movie for great visual and sound effects, but it is (at least for me) a powerful emotional journey. Highly recommended.

Mr. Stern:
One of my dreams in life has been to drink some Pilsner Urquell on tap in Prague. One of my top flicks was filmed there, I believe. "Amadeus" is a beautiful experience on many levels. I won't go on about it, except to say thank you Mozart, and thank you Sir Neville Marriner and company!
(The 'making of' feature on the director's cut DVD is almost as good as the movie.)

John A.:
I have a saying: "If it isn't Bach, Mozart or Beethoven, then the music isn't perfect." Some music is less perfect more than others, of course.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 181
Registered: Feb-04
John S

Thanks, I will look out for "The Straight Story." I must admit Lynch intrigues me though I don't always get it. Amadeus was great. Hulce was great as was Oldman in his portrayal of Ludwig in the movie of which the title will surely come to me after I post this. Generally I'm not a great classical music fan though I do really appreciate these composers when their music comes to life from quality recordings of talented orchestras.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 131
Registered: Dec-03
obviously you have the no brainers.

lord of the rings all 3.

matrix kinda all 3.

all the indiana jones.

all the star wars.

all the aliens.

now i think rantz you and i are in the same boat
on this. that i just haven't seen that movie
that just blows me away on all fronts.

but hear are a few that i think are darn good and
if you haven't seen any of them should give em a try.

i really enjoyed FACE OFF and BROKEN ARROW 2 very
good john woo films.hears the rest.

a long kiss goodnight.
seven. (one of my favorites)
gladiator.
kiss the girls.
the fifth element.
reign of fire.
the game.
true lies.
das boot.
predator.
all the terminators.
apacolypse now (my favorite war film)
enemy at the gate.
both blade movies.(excelent sound and video)
heat.(very good acting)
pulp fiction.
fight club.
glory.
the usual suspects.
the haunting. (great sound)
blade runner.
italian job.

and last but not least 2 western's that have to
be seen.

tombstone and silverado both with outstanding
cast/acting.

one last throw in excelent sond and video with
fairly good acting and plot would be LOST IN SPACE.

I'M STILL TRYING TO FIND THAT ONE THAT I WOULD
JUST SAY THAT WAS FREAKIN INCREDIBLE.

IF ANYONE HAS IT LET ME KNOW!
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 183
Registered: Feb-04
John S

I knew it!

Gary Oldman's movie title just came to me: "Immortal Beloved"

Keggar

Thanks. We've seen all those including the westerns. Some of those are very good but still waiting for that special "great" one - and more!

If asked what's the best movie I have ever seen I don't think I could give an answer. Naturally, there have been several excellent ones!
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 133
Registered: Dec-03
i agree with you rants still waiting for that
special one myself.

i just put the list out there in case you might
have missed one or two.

i know i have missed a lot of movies that at the
time i said "oh man i want to see that" then
forgot completly about it.just wish someone could
remind me of some!

i also have not seen the movie that if asked
what's my favorite movie. except, like i said
earlier,i hate to say a comedy but CADDY SHACK
would be it.

i really like movies that grab you and pull you
into there plot whether trying to figure them out
or just being entertained.but something with a
little more substance.

another one that comes to mind is Equilibrium it
was pretty interesting.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 184
Registered: Feb-04
Keggar, I do appreciate your list, in fact it reminded me of a couple I'd like to see again. As we see little tv (reception black spot) we have seen just about every movie worth a watch that's been released here.

One recent comedy I enjoyed was Shanghai Knights. Bill Murray's Groundhog Day was a good laugh also.

I think the thing that spoils comedies these days is that the writers seem to think that only crude language and vulgarity can create a laugh. After one such movie - where's the originality?

There are many novels I have read from which I believe some great movies could be made. Nelson De Mille especially has a few that come to mind but I could go on forever.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 677
Registered: Dec-03
JOHN S,

Your three composers saw a bit further, no question. But they stood on gaints' shoulders. Not even those amazing guys had a monopoly on approaching perfection. The real revolutionary, without whom there would be no Mozart or Rolling Stones, was Monteverdi. imho

My Rantz,

I am no prude, but I just have to censor some movies for family viewing. The classification system does not work. You can get ten minutes in and discover your children should not be there, and there is no warning, and it is in your home.

I like good sound etc., naturally. But some old movies pack in more in mono and black-and-white than you can with all the special effects in the book.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 185
Registered: Feb-04
John A

"But some old movies pack in more in mono and black-and-white than you can with all the special effects in the book"

Agree 100% But they are hard to get.

I have often recommended movies to my parents. Following up, my father can tell exactly how many times the "F" word was used. It's so regular one forgets. I think there 94 in "Four Weddings and a Funeral." I apologise and tell him he's always got a finger to press the remote.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 679
Registered: Dec-03
My Rantz,

Casablanca and Twelve Angry Men are both on DVD.

If you liked "Four Weddings", "Notting Hill" is good. I am personally slightly allergic to Hugh Grant, but it's "feelgood" farce, really.

Austin Powers 2 (as it was titled in the UK) is an interesting one, since in the US and continental Europe the original title was not regarded as obscene.

I always wondered how the title "Austin Powers: the Spy who F***ed Me" (precisely the same meaning) would have gone down in middle America!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Docdat

CopenhagenDenmark

Post Number: 17
Registered: Apr-04
I'm surprised noone has mentioned The Shawshank Redemption yet. That's one of the most powerful movies I've ever seen. :-)
 

Silver Member
Username: Rick_b

New york Usa

Post Number: 150
Registered: Dec-03
How about perhaps one of the most important films of the last 50 years........"Schindlers List".
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 133
Registered: Feb-04
A great movie that is also topical is THREE KINGS, about the first Gulf War. It's got a smart script, humor, action, great cast, great plot, interesting visuals and sound, and is ultimately touching. Two Cents gives it four stars.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 54
Registered: Dec-03
Movies like Schindler's List and Shawshank Redemption don't exactly set the bar for special effects. I would not reccomend them for somebody that wants story, sound, and effects.

Black Hawk Down (Deluxe Edition), Dark City, The Big Lebowski, and Requium for a Dream are some that I would reccomend.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 188
Registered: Feb-04
John A

I preferred Notting Hill to 4 Weddings - H Grants flatmate was hilarious.

Adam

The Shawshank Redemption is one of the excellent movies for sure. Liked Green Mile also.

Rick

Schindlers List was great, very moving indeed, but like The Piano was also very depressing.

Last night, we finally got to see "Master and Commander." It was great entertainment and one of the best for sound FX. We were sitting right there in the ship surrounded by the storm with everything crashing down on us. Almost needed to don a life vest to watch it. More so, we thought, than in The Perfect Storm." The DTS surround was amazing from the cannon fire to the tension in the rigging. It's up there, but still, not THE movie.

Ben

Some good recommendations. Blackhawk Down had some good FX, but was really just a shooting gallery which I found a little too tiring.

Citizen Kane was voted the best movie of all time. Did anyone get to vote?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 680
Registered: Dec-03
While "The Pianist", "Schindler's List" and "Life is Beautiful" portray (to me) inhumanity in action, what was going on in the perpetrators' heads is just as difficult to accept.

Conspiracy, about the Wannsee conference, 1942, still scares me when I think about it. No violence, no special effects; all the more disturbing to see how the the "final solution" was arrived at, round a table, with "civilised" people who talked about political realities, were polite to each other, enjoyed a good cigar, took a vote, and then listened to Schubert on a wind-up gramophone.

Trying to lighten up (difficult): Kenneth Branaugh was brilliant in that, he always is.

Glad you liked "Master & Commander", My Rantz. I never wish to recommend a dud! Yes, I also thought Spike, the Welshman, was a great character in "Notting Hill".
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 55
Registered: Dec-03
I liked the fact that they kept "Black Hawk Down" true to the original events (pretty much). The deluxe edition also has a second disk with documantaries on the real event.

If you haven't seen "Memento" I recommend the special edition of that one. Not exceptional effects, but one of the most creative movies in recent history.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 189
Registered: Feb-04
Ben

I agree with you about "Memento" - a real mind twister. Guy Pearce did well with a difficult script.

John A

"Conspiracy" yes, really frightening and thought provoking film.

Branaugh always shines, one of the true actors of our time. Even in the "Wild, Wild West" a silly but humourous western adventure, he gave it all.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 431
Registered: Dec-03
While I certainly love Beethoven's music as much as Mozart's, I never thought that the movie "Immortal Beloved" with Gary Oldham as Beethoven was in the same league as "Amadeus". The script and general movie making of Amadeus was infinitely superior and had the benefit of a great performance by F. Murray Abraham as Scalieri. I had hoped for a Beethoven movie on the level of Amadeus. Oh well.

"Conspiracy" was certainly an excellent portrayal of the surviving record at the Wannsee Conference in 1942. It was the most chilling movie I ever saw. Great performances by Brannagh as SS General Reinhard Heydrich (playing the SS head as a cultured, charming, scary, and soul-less man), and Stanley Tucci as Adolph Eichmann (SS colonel and flunky aid, who embodies the efficient bureaucracy of evil) and others. The fact that the movie was taken from actual notes during the meeting about the "final solution" is even more chilling. The movie is both painful and great; like seeing a slow-motion carnage-filled car wreck in words, except with millions in the cars.

I also thought "Memento" was great. I must have seen that dvd 5 or so times. I learn something new each time. I might tell you what I really think happened privately, but I don't want to say here, to potentially ruin the movie for those who haven't seen it (even though it probably wouldn't make a difference, in this movie that moves in reverse. An amazing performance by Guy Pearce, and great performances by John Pantoliano and Carrie-Anne Moss. Kudo's to young Brit director, Christopher Nolan (who also directed an earlier and fine movie---Bound)---and his brother for writing the story.

I agree--Three Kings was excellent and an interesting take and story on the 1991 Gulf Iraq war. Great script and directing by David O. Russell, whose earlier "Sp-nking the Monkey" was one quirky and jarring (and very upsetting to most people) movie about an out of sorts college age kid. Mom and son having a sinful relationship isn't good fare for most dates, relatives and definitely children!!

Liked both Shawshank Redemption and Green Mile very much--although SR ultimately had more to offer me emotionally and intellectually.

A chick-type flick I like--"Passion Fish" written/directed by John Sayles. Solid story well-told with great performances by Mary McDonnell and Alfre Woodard and the cajun and zydeco music is WONDERFUL!!! The movie captures the sound, smell, and sense of rural coastal Louisiana.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 191
Registered: Feb-04
"Liked both Shawshank Redemption and Green Mile very much--although SR ultimately had more to offer me emotionally and intellectually."

I concur. Sometimes though, I'll sit and watch what I think will be some inane women's flick (I have to fair sometimes), but find I might end up having enjoyed it. I like thought provoking movies also but now and then, there's even some mindless crap that might suit my crappy mindless mood.

I may be overstating a bit - if it's totaly mindless crap, I'll go and read a good book!

Passion Fish was one very good film. We saw it years ago on VHS and remember the enjoyment. Angela Barrett was also noteworthy.

IMO Three Kings would have been improved if someone could train Clooney to get rid of his supercillious grin :-)

Watched Kill Bill - What's in Tarrantino's head. After Pulp Fiction I think nothing much left - sorry Klegger, but after one minute of gore, what follows?
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 143
Registered: Dec-03
yu know why does everyone have to tear up my name
"KLEGGER".

no when my buddies went to the movies to watch
kill bill i didn't go but they were thinking of
going to the second one and said you have to see
the first one that is why i recently watched it.

i found it to be different like most terintino
flicks and yes the gore a little excessive but
i'm sure that in some wacky way that he wanted
it to be rediculusly excessive that way you would
not take it serious.and i found the movie to be
average at best.having said that though i do need
to see the second one though just to finish it.

i personally like terintino flicks for the most part just because they are so strange.

i know it was directed by robert rodrigez but i'm
sure terintino had some influence. i really
enjoyed tertino , clooney and harvey keitel in
the very different FROM DUSK TILL DAWN.a lot of
people thought it was cheezy the way it turned
but i dug it.hey that's me call me crazy!
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 193
Registered: Feb-04
Kegger

Sorry about the typo - that's all it was. And I wasn't flaming you for Kill Bill. We all acknowledge our differences of opinions. It's like art - some people call Pollack an artist. I don't but didin't mind the film.

Anyway, I can look at Uma all day regardless!
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 144
Registered: Dec-03
yo rantz i didn't think you were flaming me.

i just wanted to put my 2 cents in there on
terintino.

but for some reason lately everyone when they
quote me puts kegger wrong.

i didn't think YOU did it on purpose.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 195
Registered: Feb-04
That's good then - I often go crossed eyed at the computer. Keep putting off the eye test!
 

Bronze Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 74
Registered: Feb-04
John A.:
1) It could be argued that the most significant innovation in the entire history of music is polyphony (more than one single melodic line at a time). Therefore, the real giants of music were the many unnamed musicians across Europe in c.800-900 AD., without whom the glorious music of the Baroque would have been very different. And may I just say the Baroque Period (music) culminated with the death of J.S.Bach......

2) Thanks for mentioning Conspiracy. That one somehow flew under my radar. It looks like an English language remake of "The Wannsee Conference." (1984) It's a German production, filmed in Wannsee (suburb of Berlin), in German with English subtitles. I gave up half way through this film trying to keep up reading the relentless barrage of dialogue on my "postage stamp" screen at the time. Plus it was VHS.

Kegger:
From Dusk Till Dawn is a guilty pleasure of mine. Whenever somebody mentions it I can't help but think of Salma Hayek--a Mexican bombshell, my friend. Didn't see the two sequels.

Here's a plug for the best courtroom drama ever filmed: "Inherit The Wind." (1960)

My Rantz:
I'm still trying to come up with a movie that has it all, but nothing comes to mind yet, even though some excellent productions have been mentioned.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 199
Registered: Feb-04
"Here's a plug for the best courtroom drama ever filmed: "Inherit The Wind." (1960)

Spencer Tracy and Frederic March gave stellar performances. Few courtroom dramas have ever come close.

If you really want to see a great performce by Salma watch "Frieda" but you'll have to put up with her one long eyebrow.

 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 142
Registered: Feb-04
Why didn't Selma add a moustache for the role? My girlfriend is convinced that if she had had the guts to go with the moustache, she would've won the Oscar. Instead, Nicole Kidman won it by a nose.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 145
Registered: Dec-03
yo john s. glad to see someone else enjoyed that!
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 434
Registered: Dec-03
"Inherit the Wind" was very good, even though I thought that Gene Kelly was miscast as H.L. Mencken, the brilliant and curmudgeonly reviewer and writer. Spencer Tracy was much better as Clarence Darrow. Kind of like-"The Ten Comandments" with Heston had a humorously miscast Edward G. Robinson as Dathan, saying in that great Brooklyn, NY accent--"So Where's your Moses now?"--Cracks me up every time.


First two Godfather movies are great.

I love a lot of older movies--many Hitchcock films too: Vertigo, Rear Window, Rebecca, Psycho, The Birds, The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes, The Man who knew too much, North by Northwest, Stranger on a train, Spellbound, Notorious, Rope, etc. In my opinion, he has to be in everyone's top 5 in quality of movies directed--if not Numero Uno.

I love some of the old classics. "Major Barbara" (directed by Gabrial Pascal/edited by David Lean) is a must for those who haven't viewed it. A great rendition of George Bernard Shaw's play--also another great GB Shaw play as a movie-"Pygmalion" (directed by Sir Anthony Asquith/edited by David Lean) is great as is the later musical of it--"My Fair Lady", which might be the best musical of all time.


David Lean was both a great editor in his early life and a great director in his mature life: Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, Blithe Spirit, Lawrence of Arabia, Hobson's Choice, Bridge on the River Kwai, Dr. Zhivago, Brief Encounter, etc.

Anyone that hasn't seen any of the above movies owes it to themselves to give them a gander. I can't imagine anyone not adoring over 90% of them. They are all great stories, amazingly acted and told.

Sure--they mostly don't benefit much from surround sound or have flashy pyrotechnics and special effects.

I enjoy Die Hard and other testosterone movies, but if both Die Hard and either Stalag 17 (directed by Billy Wilder) or Major Barbara is on--they win by many lengths to my taste. Paticularly Major Barbara, where the words, performances, and incredible philosophy are so amazing it can leave one wondering why so few movies even approach that quality anymore.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 685
Registered: Dec-03
JOHN S,

You make a strong point.

I could have a stab at naming some early polyphonists....

Of course, the only ones whose names survive wrote their stuff down, and had the good fortune for that to survive, too. We don't know when it was invented. All we know is the earliest written stuff. If only they'd had sound recording in Egypt/ Rome/ Athens... who knows?

I agree about JSB. In fact "The Art of Fugue" went back partly to polyphony. That man was a total genius.

Others,

I also enjoyed the Die Hards, and the Godfather was on of the best movies ever. I can't imagine a musical "Major Barbara", Gregory. Thanks for the tip.

Jees what an education on this thread!
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 435
Registered: Dec-03
John A---

I meant My Fair Lady--as far as I know "Major Barbara" was only a film--not a musical. The film starred Rex Harrison (as did Pygmallion) and had a young Wendy Hiller, and a great performance by Robert Morley, along with Robert Netwon (who many will remember as Long John Silver).

Most of the great composers stand on the shoulders of those before them. Monteverdi has probably been credited with most of the transition of renaissance music to Baroque. Bach came towards the end of the Baroque period--he just wrote in the Baroque style better and more consistently than most anyone else, be it sacred or secular music. Which isn't to say that Vivaldi and Handel were any slouches.

While Bach died in 1750 at 65 years old, the next great transitional composer was probably Haydn, who was born in 1732 and invented both the modern symphonic form and the advanced string quartet forms as we know them today . Mozart and Beethoven probably wouldn't have been possible without Haydn. Haydn was born before Mozart and even lived after him. He died in 1809, while Mozart lived between 1756 and 1791. They were friends too.

Now someone else can pick up the gauntlet for The School of Rock:-)
 

Bronze Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 75
Registered: Feb-04
I know this is unfair, but I am slightly put off by seeing Harry Morgan as the judge in "Inherit the Wind." I can't help but think of him as a second string replacement on Dragnet and MASH.

"The Bridge on the River Kwai" is my nomination for the best movie of all time. I recently watched the latest DVD release (with a serviceable DD 5.1 mix), and there isn't a single false note or mis-step in its entire 162 minutes. Perfect.

BTW, if admin's reading this thread, then surely the need for "Music" and "Movies" categories must be obvious now.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 144
Registered: Feb-04
Can't believe "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" hasn't been mentioned yet. One of the great movies of recent years. It's got one thing that Tarantino lacks: soulfulness. His movies leave me empty inside, like eating cotton candy.

Is there any way to conduct a poll of the greatest movies and albums on this forum? A "Music" and "Movies" category would be a good start. I emailed the Site Administrator a few weeks ago about it. He said it's being planned. But still no sign of it yet.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Sem

Post Number: 48
Registered: Mar-04
"I love a lot of older movies--many Hitchcock films too: Vertigo, Rear Window, Rebecca, Psycho, The Birds, The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes, The Man who knew too much, North by Northwest, Stranger on a train, Spellbound, Notorious, Rope, etc. In my opinion, he has to be in everyone's top 5 in quality of movies directed--if not Numero Uno."

I agree 100%. He has long been the standard by which other directors are measured against.

On another note, I just spent a week in Arizona and now have an itch to watch a good western. Any suggestions?

 

Bronze Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 76
Registered: Feb-04
Sem:
A couple of westerns have been mentioned already, but I'd like to suggest Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven." It may be his best movie. Besides, any movie with Gene Hackman in it is OK with me.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 200
Registered: Feb-04
A great western: Lonesome Dove

Tommy Lee Jones, Robert Duvall and the very lovely Dianne Lane. A long epic and well worth a watch.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Sem

Post Number: 49
Registered: Mar-04
Great recommendations, thanks. I have seen The Unforgiven (very good movie), but not Lonesome Dove. Perhaps this weekend I'll rent it.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Sem

Post Number: 50
Registered: Mar-04
Kegger, I finially read through this thread, excellent idea.

Movie - depends what I'm in the mood for, sometimes comedy, sometimes thriller, but almost always I can sit and watch a Hitchcock movie. One of my favorites is Dial M For Murder. Its real cool because the whole murder plot is spelled out almost from the beginning, (who, how, where, when,etc), and then you sit on the edge of your seat as it slowly plays out in front of your eyes. The first time I watched it, like a dummy I was screaming at the television to Grace Kelly, "get out of the room!!!"

Musicals - hmm, not a huge fan here. Perhaps someday.

Music - No surprise here, since 1976, Alan Parsons. I actually realized a dream come true this past autumn when my wife and I had dinner with Alan and his wife and another couple. Does it get any better? Others would be most anything from the 60's and 70's including Van Morrison.
A newer band, at least for me, that I'm just getting into is Porcupine Tree. I just picked up their latest on DVD-A http://www.highfidelityreviews.com/reviews/review.asp?reviewnumber=18959790

Place to visit - Though born in Europe to American parents I've lived in the US most of my life and rarely travelled until recently. A trip two years ago to the Caymen Islands to snorkle and eat..and...eat..and eat...would rank high on my list.

Favorite thing to do - probably sit with friends I don't see as often as I'd like to and drink a couple beers,(Samuel Smith works fine here), and reminisce.

Favorite sport - American football (NY Giants).

Best thing to check out on media - still looking.









 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 146
Registered: Dec-03
good stuff there sem. some great additions.


we have allready started a request for a
music/media catagory in the suggestion and
feedbacks catagory.

they have responded by saying it looks like a
good idea.so i think they are goimg to go it.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 698
Registered: Dec-03
I have made list of all recommendations on this thread. I can e-mail it, or maybe convert to html and put it a web server, if anyone would like.

I wonder if you guys know the essential reference database?

The Internet Movie Database (UK site)

The Internet Movie Database (US site)

If I link movies here, it is to the IMDB record. You can cross-check all other movies with any chosen actor/actress, director, producer - anything. Don't believe the reviews and ratings, though.

I have been out of this a bit with a heavy work deadline, but wish to respond, espcially to Gregory and 2c on music, now way back on the thread. I wrote a whole load of stuff last night, but pressed the wrong button and lost it. Will try again soon.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 783
Registered: Dec-03
"The Last Waltz", the 1978 farewell concert of The Band, is now immovable from my list for Desert Island Discs. Recommended, strongly. It should be distributed, free, to all schools.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 465
Registered: Dec-03
John A.--

It pleases me greatly that you bought The Last Waltz and seemingly enjoy it as much as I have. I can't tell you how often I play it--I love it so much. The musicianship, the vocals and harmonies of The Band, and the songwriting put most everyone else in music from 1965 on to shame. no wonder they were able to get all those other great performers to do walk-ons with them for The Last Waltz.

I'm a Yankee, but I live in the south since 1995--Charleston, SC to be specific. And when they play-"The Night They drove Old Dixie Down", it is such an amazing performance it sends chills down my spine. And the heart wrenching lead vocal of the drummer, Levon Helm is effing unbelievable. "Stage Fright", sung by bassist Rick Danko is similarly touching. Heck, the worst performance on the disc would rate as the best on 99% of any other discs out there--it is that good.

When someone asked Eric Clapton why he left Cream he replied--"I heard the Band...and realized the music I was playing along with everyone else was found wanting". The Band was able to tap into the soul and heart of America and American music in a way rarely duplicated.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 788
Registered: Dec-03
Gregory,

I am quite moved by that, as I was with the movie. I could write reams on that concert. I am not sure which thread it should go on, or whether anyone can take any more of my homespun music criticism.

But I'll tell you just a few short things.

1. Each and every member of The Band was a consummate musician. But none even thought of trying to score points off any other. Nor off the guests. In some cases it would have been easy. But pointless, and disrespectful. So they didn't. There was simple respect, and an honesty there I just loved. One of my problems with Clapton is his apparent arrogance, master guitarist notwithstanding. That duet between him and Robertson, including the latter gracefully taking over just because Clapton's shoulder strap had broken (as you mentioned before), was pure pleasure to see. And what a fantastic number it was. Pure music. I could analyse some of the things they were doing (harmonic suspensions etc) but who cares. The whole works. As an amatuer musician I have played with so many people who see music as a struggle for supremacy, not a shared experience, a means of communication. In that performance, Clapton and Robertson were in the stratosphere, neither caring who was the better player. It was irrelevant.

2. According to the booklet, the audience just turned up to a farewell concert by The Band, not knowing who the guests were going to be. Can this be true? Being there and witnessing that, including the final all-together, must have been a unique and unforgettable experience.

3. Every major genre was represented. They could do anything, and just thought the music was what mattered most. That is real talent.

4. The interactions. Yes, choose the DVD-V.

I'd better stop. I put a "thank you" on several threads. I will check those out, too. But thanks, again. Really.
 

Silver Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 233
Registered: Feb-04
John A

Naming the band gave me a good laugh - originality at its best - and a saving of brain matter. Now, about Clapton being arrogant, well you might know better than I, but on an interview on a DVD I recommended on another thread, A Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughn, Clapton admitted to an amazing failing of his in comparing himself to the dead guitar legend. Recalled loosely, he said that Vaughn would go to some special place when he was playing and that he'd become a kind of conduit to a certain musical level in so far that he would just always know what to do next. Clapton went on to say that if it was him, he'd just freeze and do a runner. I thought that was quite humble.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 791
Registered: Dec-03
My Rantz,

Wonderful. I give in. I'll come quietly. I have revised my opinion of Clapton. I have revised my opinion of everything.

I've heard Clapton interviewed several times on TV, radio. He was even on Desert Island Discs.

I've head the same question put to him twice. It was, broadly, "How did you react to seeing the common graffito of the 60s 'Clapton is God'?"

His two answers were:

1. "I always thought it was a slight exaggeration".

2. (On Desert Island Discs) "I never took it too literally, myself".

Must go. Will be back. All the best.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 33
Registered: Apr-04
This certainly is an interesting thread. Since I don't drink beer and am not much of a movie buff, I'm afraid I don't have much value to add in those areas.

Earlier, there was a lament about the lack of knowledge/interest in classical music by American masses. Guilty as charged. But, I have developed an interest recently. My faves at this point are Mahler Symphony No.5 (Bernstein Classics) and Beethoven Symphony No. 9. I have a feeling I'll learn a lot more about this through this forum.

My absolute fave artist is Aimee Mann. I love so-called "intellectual pop" by artists such as Ms. Mann, Elliott Smith, Wilco, etc. I love 1950-1960's jazz by the likes of Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, etc. I love female artists such as Nina Simone, Dusty Springfield, Dinah Washington,etc. I love Americana music by the likes of Gillian Welch, Lucinda Williams, Jayhawks, etc. I love JOHNNY CASH. His "Live at Folsom Prison" album is a must have.

My favorite radio station is WNCW, broadcasting from Isothermal Community College in Spindale, NC. They are an Americana station with an eclectic mix of blues, bluegrass, pop, rock, jazz, country, swing, etc. During the week, these genres are mixed throughout the day. On the weekend, they do a jazz show on Saturday morning, followed by a Swing show followed by an afternoon of bluegrass. Sunday mornings there's "old-time religious" show followed by some roots and acoustic music shows. They broadcast over the internet (only at 20kbps) at wncw.org.

My favorite movie is "Vertigo". The movie that had the weirdest impact on me was "What Lies Beneath" during which there is a scene where a character shows off her Karman Ghia Cabriolet (an old VW). Afterwards, I became obsessed with this car and ended up making a trip to Indiana to purchase (and tow to NC) A 1967 Ghia Cabriolet, which turned out to be such a rust bucket that it ended up being a parts car - for the 1969 Ghia Cabriolet that I subsequently purchased (and towed from Pennsylvania to NC). Several years later, this car is still a work in progress.

With all the accolades given "The Last Waltz", it has been put on my must get list.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 799
Registered: Dec-03
Welcome, Ghia!

Mahler 5 is about his best, imho, and I know the Bernstein version is very highly thought of, by people who seem to know. I've only heard the slow movement of that version. I recall Bernstein does it slower than anyone else ever dared, but stills holds all attention.

2c seems to be our resident Mahler expert!

One liberating thing about "classical" music (it is the wrong word, but I don't know another) is that you are never tied to one artist, or one record company. I've written off SACD for various reasons, mostly prejudiced, but when people say "but will I be able to get x on DVD-Audio?" it is a valid point if x has an exclusive contract. I am glad to be out of all that.

I do think most "classical" just sounds awful unless you have high-fidelity sound reproduction. True high-resolution surround sound takes it all on to another stage.

Another strange thing in record stores and reviews, if you have the sort of interest that some of us here seem to have, is when people say something like "Beethoven Symphony no. 9; got that". There are seemingly endless interpretations and different recordings of something as big as that, and they are all as different as chalk and cheese. Which one to get can make all the difference. I suppose most people find that a bit daunting. But, definitely, the one NOT to get is the one that comes in the series "My kind of Beethoven" or whatever. Or in a big compilation (there are mail order ads for these everywhere). My doctor has everything by Beethoven, he told me, once. All on Deutsche Gramophon. ARGH. the box must be size of a suitcase, and have cost more than your car. Some people just have too much money!

BTW greatly liked "What lies beneath". "The Others" was similar, I thought. I am not usually allowed to watch "horror" movies because I spoil it for everyone else with mirth, or even wisecracks (unforgivable I know), at what are supposed to be moments of high tension. Those two were different.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 191
Registered: Dec-03
good stuff ghia (you don't drink beer geez) lol.

I myself am a car person (use to be more when i
was younger)tear um down rebuild um break um and
start over.

lately i've been more of an electronic person
putting together sound and entertainment systems.

recently putting a lot of time into building and
listening to speakers. "very rewarding."

the ideas shared hear are pretty diverse.
and pleasantly different.

as you can see i'm fairly staight to the point
and simple while others well give a more indepth
interpratation.

but it's a nice board where if you want to, can
gain some very interesting info.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 34
Registered: Apr-04
Kegger:

That's not to say I "wouldn't" drink beer, just don't do it enough to have a favorite or a recommendation. I do remember having a sort of fascination with St. Pauli Girl Bier when I was in my late teens - but that may have had more to do with living in a small town that generally had the usual roundup - Bud, Miller, etc - so this made me feel more "worldly". Hehehe...the things you think you know when you're 18!

The Ghia restoration has been a journey for sure. I've learned about things like rockers, floorpans, wiring harnesses, etc. I call it the FrankenGhia since it has the frame/body of a 1969, engine and dash components of a 1967/ seats from a 1970 plus other various new parts. Most of the body work and the engine rebuild I had to hire out but I've done quite a bit of disassembly/reassembly, wiring harness installation, parts location, etc. It's maybe 80% complete. Still need to do the interior and build a new convertible top for it.

My other "building" project was a kayak made of Okoume Mahogany.

John A:

Learning about the different intrepretations and finding the good ones is a challenge - not to mention figuring out how to pronounce the names. ;-)

Without having a single point of reference, Bernstein's Mahler is wonderful! I definitely plan to get other cd's from the Bernstein Classics series. But, it sounds like I need to seek out other interpretations of the 5th as well. Then, perhaps I'll understand things like "slow movement". This is like learning a new language for me.

The Beethoven's 9th I have is from an NPR series "Milestones of the Millenium". It is from a 1961 recording of the Cleveland Orchestra conducted by George Szell with the Cleveland Orchestra choir and Robert Shaw. Again, without knowing much about this type of music, I can say this performance completely captivates me. There seems to be quite a bit of noise in the recording but that is a minor annoyance compared to the reward of the performance.

Has anyone here ever watched "The Wizard of Oz" while listening to Pink Floyd "Dark Side of the Moon"? I've heard its quite a revelation. ;-) Once I get my new system in place, I plan to do this.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 35
Registered: Apr-04
Lists of Five for You to Try

Read:

"To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee
"The Good Life" by Douglas Wallop
"Life of Pi" by Yann Martel
"Einstein's Dreams" by Alan Lightman
"The Alienist" by Caleb Carr

Listen:

"Lost in Space" - Aimee Mann
"Live at Folsom Prison" - Johnny Cash
"XO" - Elliott Smith
"A Love Supreme" - John Coltrane
"A World Without Tears" - Lucinda Williams

Eat:

Kaarma - in Mississauga, ON Kaarma
Vidalia & Grapes - Charlotte, NC Vidalia&Grapes
Trocadero - Dublin Trocadera
Chocolate Florentine Lace Cookies - Future Bakery, St. Lawrence Market, Toronto Future Bakery
Tomato Sandwiches - Recipe: 4 slices of homegrown tomatos between 2 slices of french bread, slathered with Duke's Mayo and seasoned with salt & pepper.

Visit:

Ireland
London
NC Coast - (Sunset Beach, Wrightsville Beach, Ocracoke, Corolla)
San Francisco (and Point Reyes north of the city)
Asheville, NC
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 804
Registered: Dec-03
Ghia,

Gee, a lady rebuilding classic car, as well as being seriously into audio, as well as knowing what is what with computers. I am not, at all, criticising. All strength to you!

Bernstein was a completely brilliant guy. They got him in to conduct Beethoven 9 in Berlin, in 1989, after the wall was knocked down. By about a million people, some of whom had driven overnight halfway across Europe with a sledgehammer in the trunk of their car, just to get up on that symbol of human stupidity, and do their bit. I always thought it was just wonderful that at American arrived to oversee a new, and better, cultural order. Thank you!

The Mahler 5 "slow movement" I meant is the fourth movement, marked "Adagietto", Italian for "a little adagio". "Adagio" is Italian for "slow". Surely you have heard Samuel Barber's wonderful "Adagio for Strings"? The Mahler 5 "Adagietto" was used in the movie "Death in Venice". (BTW Friends have commented how wonderfully well educated Italians must be in music, since they have road signs saying things like "Adagio" to indicate a speed restriction....)

As for getting alternative versions, well, there was a Wall Street broker or something who knew little about music, but just walked into a Mahler concert in New York, about twenty or so years ago. He was so knocked out, he took a year off, to study music from scratch, also conducting, just so he could take a shot at conducting just one movement of one Mahler Symphony. I think it was number 5. His version is recorded, and people say it is one of the best. Others here will remember his name. Where are you, 2c....?

If you want to get different versions of anything, consider the label Naxos. I probably plug Naxos here more than I plug NAD. Their recordings and performances are consistently rated highly by everyone except the vested interests, in the big labels, whose premium CDs are about three times the price. Naxos CDs are so cheap you can afford to make mistakes, but you rarely do. I have a Naxos of Mahler 5, by the Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, it is brilliant; performance and recording. Naxos DVD-As are about twice the price of their CDs, which is still a lot cheaper than an ordinary, premium-label, CD.

I don't know about the Naxos Beethoven 9. I have four of that, two on CD, two on LP. A great "modern instruments" one is Sir Georg Solti/Chicago Symphony. I once lived briefly quite close the hall in which it was recorded. I don't know how well Decca/London tranferred that to CD. For a totally different take, you could think of trying an "original instruments" version, like Norrington/London Classical Players (EMI) or Bruggen/The Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century (Phillips). I can recommend either of those, unreservedly. Difficult to choose between them, but they are still completely different from each other. Warning, that road leads many places!
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