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Do the black strips burn in??

 

New member
Username: Packer_edge

Post Number: 11
Registered: 12-2003
On a widescreen projection TV, when watching a 4:3 signal, will the black stips on the side burn into the screen eventually??
 

Anonymous
 
CRT, CRT RPTV, Plasma, and LCD RPTV are all subject to the burn-in problem. DLP and LCos, in theory, are not.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Packer_edge

Post Number: 12
Registered: 12-2003
Really, I didn't realize that those other kids are also subject to burn-in. Are plasma and LCD RPTV as suseptible to burn in as a CRT RPTV or are they any better?
 

Anonymous
 
LCD RPTV will not burn in. CRT/CRT RP and Plasma will.
 

Anonymous
 
I second that LCD RPTV will not burn in. Plasma is much more prone to burn in than CRT/CRT RP.
 

New member
Username: Jags

Raleigh, Nc Us

Post Number: 3
Registered: Mar-04
yes plasma's CAN have burn in but its very hard to do so. Its a common miss conception and it does take a great deal to do so. I have one and the screen froze while i was at work for about 2 hours when i came home i figured there went a couple thousand down the drain i turned off the tv and turned it back on and it was fine. (i also use it as a computer monitor, and the screen saver froze, good screen saver huh)
 

candymanaz
Unregistered guest
plasma burn in BAD
watch techtv and their plasma's had bad burn in

bought a 50v500 lcd...AWESOME!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Jags

Raleigh, Nc Us

Post Number: 16
Registered: Mar-04
Candymanaz have you ever owned a plasma or are you just going by what other people tell you? and what you have read? cause like i said mine has yet to burn and i have had it for over a year. and talk to me in 5 months when your having problems with that lcd.
 

Anonymous
 
Burn-in problem has been around for many years. How come no one talked about it much in the good old CRT TV days? People have been using the older 4:3 TV to display widescreen movies and not worry too much about burn-in. All you need is some common sense not to leave your TV with a static picture for a long period of time. Make sure you use the entire screen from time to time. When showing SD material, stretch it or zoom in some time to "execise" the whole screen and your TV (no matter what kind of TV) will be OK for a long time to come.

In a different discussion, the TV manufacturers would not cover burn-in in their warranties because they don't consider burn-in a defect. They consider it a "misuse".
 

Anonymous
 
I bought a Pioneer PDP434 almost 3 weeks ago. There is one channel that I watch frequently. After watching this channel for about 10 days, approx. 3 hours a day, it's logo in the top-right corner is now burned in. I knew about the potential burn-in problem so I inspected the screen every day carefully. It is now just in the very early stages of burn-in and on a moving picture it isn't visible, but if a static picture is displayed (especially on a white background) it is visible. It isn't "clearly" visible, but it is there.
According to the manual, displaying a static image continuously for a very long period, or for shorter periods over several days, the screen can burn-in. The second warning seems to apply to my situation. From what I've heard, burn-in occurs much more quickly during the first 200 hours of use. After that it takes longer for an image to burn-in. I cannot comment on that though because I haven't had my plasma that long yet.
The Pioneer has an option to shift the picture up-down-left-right 1 pixel at a time. I have now adjusted the picture so the logo is scrolled out of view. According to the manual the burned-in image should become less visible over time. I cannot say yet if it will disappear completely. Only time will tell. I would like to point out though that the burn-in problem would not prevent me from buying a plasma in the future. If you know about the potential burn-in problem and you adjust your viewing habits accordingly (e.g. do not watch the same channel for long periods of time and regularly switch between the different zoom settings so the logo's aren't displayed in the same spot all the time) I can live with that. The picture itself is just awesome!!!
 

boxer22
Unregistered guest
i have a plasma tv behind my bed, i put pictures on it, so i dont have to buy them, i left one picture on it without turning it off and no protection for 1 year and 2 months, the burn in is really bad, is there anyway to fix it?
 

Anonymous
 
> "I bought a Pioneer PDP434 almost 3 weeks ago."...

Follow up:

2 weeks have passed since I posted my previous message. The burned-in logo is now completely gone. Even on a static white background not a trace is visible. I have read on several places that displaying moving images for about 3 times as long as the static image was displayed should correct a burned-in image. This seems to be the case, fortunately :-)

@boxer22:
Are you serious? Well, maybe displaying moving images on the display for 3 years, 6 months might solve your problem too, but I fear that that much burn-in is probably permanent.
 

Anonymous
 
boxer22
Make a negative image of your picture, and leave it there for 1 year and 2 months. You problem will be fixed.
 

tmalone
Unregistered guest
I recently purchased a Panasonic Widescreen projection television. I work a lot during the week, but on weekends I like to watch dvd movies. Although my tv has a 16x9 aspect ratio, the majority of movies I own are anamorphic scope. Which means there are still black bars across the screen. How worried should I be about image burn in? How expensive is it to have the problem corrected by the factory?
 

New member
Username: Jimbolee

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-04
I have a pioneer plasma that i got about 8 months ago. I watch tv and dvd on it and there no burn in at all, the screen is absolutly magnificent. I also have a sharp lcd screen thats 30inches vs the plasmas 50 and it doesnt compair in sharpness or contrast, plasma is the way to go, you just cant be an idiot and leave a screen on there for long periods of time and make sure not to leave it on one chanel like abc that has a logo. Also it helps if you jump from one chanel to another here and there to mix the pixels around so that there is a less chance of burn in. The black bars you dont really have to worry about because the pixels arnt on durring that period its usually only colors you have to worry about
 

Anonymous
 
All burn-in discussions mention not to allow a static picture for "a long period of time".
What is a "long period of time"?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Vindsl

Post Number: 13
Registered: Jul-04
LCD RPTV will not burn in. CRT/CRT RP and Plasma will.
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I second that LCD RPTV will not burn in. Plasma is much more prone to burn in than CRT/CRT RP.

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Depending on your definition of "burn in", LCD Rear Projection HDTV's will, in fact, burn-in. LCD makes use of organic materials. Given enough time and heat, they will 'wash-out'. They are, however, burn-in resistant.

How much time does is take? Texas Instruments (the DLP guys) did some tests. Take it with a grain of salt. They ran a sampling of 5-LCD RPTV's against 2-DLP's, 24/7. The first LCD unit had noticeable burn-in, after 1300+ hours, and so it went. According to TI, eventually all the LCD's burned in, but none of the DLP were effected. You get the idea... :-)

SOURCE: http://www.projectorcentral.com/lcd_dlp_test.htm

Anyway, I have a Sony GWIII, and I don't worry about it. Neither should you. Just make sure your LCD RPTV has plenty of ventilation. Heat is what kills them. Don't shoehorn them into a closed-up entertainment center, for instance. They need to breathe!

Truth be told, I think I'll buy a DLP HDTV and find out for myself. My GWIII is in the 'family room', and I need another set for the 'living room', so...
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