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Toshiba 34HF84 Screen Burn In?

 

New member
Username: Jimmyjam

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jan-05
I am in the market for a 34" HD-Ready CRT television. My main question is about the Toshiba 34HF84 with a 16:9 ratio and if it can get screen burn in like a rear projection TV or a plasma TV. For that matter, is it possible for any CRT monitor like this to get screen burn in? I have never heard of this happening in the past. The reason I am concerned about this is that in the User Manual for the Toshiba 34HF84 it states that images left on the screen too long can be burned in or permanently fixed into your screen if you leave static images on too long. This is not a good thing to have if you are thinking about watching 4:3 programs in their original aspect ratio.

It is between the Toshiba, the Sony 34HS420, and the Panasonic CT-34WX54. They all have pluses and minuses too numerous to go into here, but my main concern currently is the potential burn in issue of the CRT screen on the Toshiba. I have read the manuals for the other two televisions and there is no mention of potential burn in at all in either of the manuals.

Any help would be of course appreciated.
 

xvxvxvx
Unregistered guest
All CRT's are subject to screen burn in. From the itty bitty 2.5" handheld TV's all the way up to the largest CRT ever manufactured. The only displays not subject to burn in are DLP's, LCD's, LCOS and DILA.

Now the good news, if you have your display prfessionally calibrated or even just do it your self as long as you don't leave your display on 24/7 you will likely experience no problems.

xvxvxvx
 

New member
Username: Jimmyjam

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jan-05
Thanks for the advice. I went ahead and reviewed again the Pansonic Owner's Manual and they said the same thing and to limit the amount of time per week to 15% for fixed images. That should not be a problem at our house, but it will change somewhat how I view the 4:3 aspect ratio stuff by stretching the screen sometimes rather than always having the bars on there.
 

this guy
Unregistered guest
well, if you're worried about burnin of the black bars on the sides of your 4:3 picture on a 16:9 screen, don't be. Black doesn't burn in, it is the natural color of the phosphurous screen which actually burns in. Only red, blue, and green (which combine to make any color on your TV) actually burn it in. Black will not burn it in.
 

Silver Member
Username: Dmwiley

Post Number: 840
Registered: Feb-05
this guy, very interesting post. Can you follow that up with some reference materials?
 

Silver Member
Username: Dmwiley

Post Number: 841
Registered: Feb-05
x, are you sure LCDs are not subject to burn in? Somehow or another, I thought they were.
 

New member
Username: Mccambley

BREEZY POINT, NY USA

Post Number: 9
Registered: Jun-05
LCD and DLP are not subject to burn in onlt CRT and Plasma are.
 

Silver Member
Username: Dmwiley

Post Number: 875
Registered: Feb-05
Thanks Casey. Can you comment on this guy's post?
 

New member
Username: Billywilder

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-05
While we're on this topic, I have a related question. I am also considering purchasing one of the Toshiba CRTs. My step-father has the 26" and his 4:3 mode has grey bars at the side (as opposed to black bars). Do grey bars affect burn-in differently than black bars? I would assume it would, but I might be wrong....
 

Bronze Member
Username: The_nerdly_guy

Post Number: 37
Registered: Apr-05
Check this out:

PodCapsule #1 - Keeping Your TV Healthy

"Getting your TV home and set up properly is only the beginning, getting it to perform at its best for as long as you own it is another trick altogether. Listen to this Capsule for tips and tricks to keep your TV in tip-top health, and perform like new for a longer period of time."

It's a podcast that you can stream from their site. I listened to it, and it's very educational for a 25 minute program. One of the topics was about burn-in, and tips on how to avoid it. Best of all, it wasn't boring. I really recommend it.

According to the program, burn-in is when a static image wears into the screen, which occurs because of uneven wear. The program said that black doesn't wear the screen phosphor at all, so a static image can be created because it is wearing at a different rate than the rest of the screen. So, according to the program... "this guy" is incorrect.
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