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Blowing speakers (not in that way haha)

 

Jayb
Unregistered guest
Is it possible to blow speakers even when your not feeding them with thier max wattage. (300 watt speaker, 120 watts a channel) I ask because at times when i really push my system I'm a little freaked about bustin my stuff up.
Just a concern thats all.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

SPEAKERS DON'T GOT NO WATTS!!!


 

Bronze Member
Username: Delsole

Post Number: 14
Registered: Feb-05
J. Vigne

what do you mean by that
so 130 watt reciever could acually blow a 300 watt speakers from what you say about them having no watts
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

Uh huh!


 

Jayb
Unregistered guest
You fail to understand the question. I'm well aware that speakers don't produce wattage. all I'm asking is it possible to blow a speaker without feeding it max wattage.
My receiver is 120 x 7
My speakers range from 300 rms to 120 rms
So yes some of my speakers will recieve so called max power, and I am aware that 120x 7 is not actual power when in multichannel mode it's about 60% of that.
It just seems sometimes that my speakers are near thier limit thats all.

 

Bronze Member
Username: Delsole

Post Number: 15
Registered: Feb-05
O i got ya i know wat your saying sometimes your afraid to turn them up any louder because you think they might blow
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

The very most straight forward answer with the most validity in the most circumstances would be; that's when you turn it down or you might blow a speaker. If you are clipping the amplifier's waveform, or pushing the drivers beyond their physical limits, you will damage your speakers sooner or later. There are too may ways to answer particulars of the situation to go into. If you simply don't run your system at a level that indicates stress, you should not damage components.


 

Jayb
Unregistered guest
Exactly, so what's the deal, can you blow speakers with less power than they can handle or am I just a pussyclot of the audio world.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

Yes, the most common way to damage a speaker is to run the amp into clipping. It doesn't matter what the "maximum recommended wattage" of the speaker reads on the label.



 

Jayb
Unregistered guest
Thanks J. I must say that your insight has been quite helpful on a few issues now. I was hoping you could give me some advice on my question in the subwoofer forum about dual subs with one output.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

I haven't read this but it sounds helpful.

http://www.nissanperformancemag.com/december01/speakers.shtml


Put "clipping and speaker damage" into a search engine.



 

Bronze Member
Username: Thinker311

Post Number: 39
Registered: Feb-05
J.V, does the below statement break the "speakers dont go no watts" rule?

A little satalite speaker that is rated to hadle a max of 50 watts, should not be hooked into a reciever that produces 100 watts per channel because this speaker would not be able to handle the load.

 

Bronze Member
Username: Thinker311

Post Number: 40
Registered: Feb-05
If u can, first answer the fist post individualy of this one. But, i rethoght my previous statement.....

If a little sat is only rated to handle a max watt of 50 SO WHAT, because speakers dont go no watts.

A reciever with more power (or a higher wattage) is less likely to clip at higher volumes.

It would be wiser to pair that satelite with an amp that does over the spekers watts, oppesed to an amp that came closer to matching the low wattage of the speaker, because...the lower you go in amp power (aka watts) the more likely you are to clip and cause speaker damage.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

Not really, Philip. It still boils down to - when you hear distortion, turn it down. It doesn't matter what the amplifier's power rating is, you can drive it into clipping. A speaker's max power rating is about as useful as saying the trunk of your car can hold 20 bags. Bags of what? Doesn't matter, just don't put more than 20 bags in there. OK, I put 20 bags of feathers in the trunk and it did fine. I put 20 bags of cement in there and it didn't do as well.
A speaker's max wattage rating is virtually useless because it doesn't take into account the type of signal that will deliver that amount of wattage. Low bass with a percussive attack is much more difficult to handle than a midrange drone. The immediate affect of pushing the voice coil beyond its physical limits to do a big bass note may mean you never reach full power, you've still gone too far because you've pushed the driver past its physical limits. The midrange drone, however, will heat up the voice coil over time. If the amp is clipping with this signal, you can still damage a speaker but it will take longer. Woofer's are dificult to blow, though not impossible. Tweeters are the most common fatality in a speaker and they are damaged by the distotrion of clipping 99% of the time. High frequencies are normally only small wattage amounts compared to the power it takes to deliver bass response. Lots of watts into the woofer, a few watts into the tweeter. If the amplifier is driven into clipping by the bass, the distortion of clipping is high order ditortion product and ends up in the tweeter. The tweeter blows even though it was only dealing with a few watts of power. The tweeter blows even though the distortion was caused by the excessive amount of power required to reproduce the bass.
The minimum power on a speaker tells you a bit about the speaker, somewhat like the efficiency spec does. Not much in reality. Overall, however, the only numbers on a speaker's specification lit that should matter to you will be the H x D x W to make certain it fits your space and the weight since you can only put 20 bags in your trunk.


 

Bronze Member
Username: Thinker311

Post Number: 42
Registered: Feb-05
Gabe - "I am about to buy a Yamaha 630W 6.1-Ch. A/V Home Theater Receiver - Silver Model: HTR-5750
630W total power: 6 x 105W 1kHz power rating @ 8 ohms
I want to put 3 ceiling speakers in the rear for surround and am looking at the JBL Soundpoint 6.5 2 way speakers. I am going to put one in several rooms so need 3 pair and can get them for 102.00 per pair on the net. Here are the specs below...will they be enough or do I need 100Watts?? Thanks"

• Sensitivity (2.83V @ 1m): 88dB
• Low-Frequency Driver: 6-1/2" Titanium-laminate cone with rubber surround
• High-Frequency Driver: 1" Titanium-laminate dome with EOS waveguide and swivel mount
• Maximum Recommended Amplifier Power: 80 Watts
• Frequency Response (--10dB): 40Hz -- 20kHz
• Crossover Frequency: 2.6kHz

Canuck - "If the speakers are rated at 80 watts max and you have a 105w/chan reciever you may have purchased a bigger receiver than you need. Typically you want to get a speaker with a higher max wattage than your amplifier, otherwise you can run into trouble."

S.C - "The 80's will work just fine. As J.V. noted, if you turn it up to the point where you hear distortion, turn it down till you dont."

J.v, If poor Gabe were only allowed to get speakers based on those watt specks, would a easy fix be to get speakers with better sensitivity? Since this would lessen the need to increase the amps output.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

Philip, Gabe asked a stupid question. The specs don't tell him if this will "be enough". No one can honestly tell Gabe what will be enough until Gabe gets everything home and does his best to blow something up. Sensitivity figures will tell you enough to know that a speaker rated at 89dB will not play as loud as a speaker rated at 95dB. And they will give you a start on how much louder one will play than the other with the same amp. What they will not tell you is why one 89dB speaker doesn't play as loudly as another 89dB speaker on the same amp. Please don't ask me to explain anymore about that. You need to go out and listen. Cruise the internet for your information. Stick something like "speaker sensitivity" in a search engine and start to read. Try Ask Jeeves. You'll find more information than I can give you bit by bit. Put stuff in bookmarks so you can find it again. Give it a try.




 

mauimusicman
Unregistered guest
what the heck is " EOS Waveguide"????????????????????????????????????????
 

Bronze Member
Username: Gavincumm

Post Number: 100
Registered: Feb-05
EOS is short for "elliptical oblate spheroid" and is a JBL exclusive.
 

KD
Unregistered guest
J. Vigne, you sound very knowledgeable in this subject. Here is the reason I am posting today, as one of my speaker's tweeter was blown recently. I have Nak AV-10 receiver and MA speakers, recently right speaker tweeter blew. It actually smoked. It wasn't even loud. Midway volume level. I am afraid to use it any further ? Somewhat clueless what to do next ? Even if the tweeter is replaced, it can blow again ? What should I do to the Amp ? How do i test if it is clipping or putting DC out ? Thanks.
 

Varit
Unregistered guest
There is no reason not to get a receiver that has more watts than your speakes are rated for. All you have to do is listen for distortion. If you get a 65 watt receiver for 80 watt speakers, you might have to push the receiver very hard to get a certain volume that we will say is the max with no distortion. With a 120 watt receiver, you will be sending a much cleaner signal to get that same max volume. So, it turns out the more powerful receiver is actually better for your speakers, not worse.
 

Silver Member
Username: Paul_ohstbucks

Post Number: 390
Registered: Jan-05
Funny that I saw this topic after clipping my Cerwin Vegas D-9s for the first time ever in 20 years........

I was watching "The Incredibles" while partaking in my favorite adult beverage when a loud segment came on and I heard 'pop...pop......pow' in an instant my receiver shut itself off. Interesting enough, through many years of abuse, I've never been able to ever damage any tweeters or mids.

My speakers have internal fuzeboxes with 4amp fuses and one of them blew. The funny thing is that I didnt even notice that I listened to movies for the remainder of the night minus my front/right speaker...........Heh

Needless to say, a quick trip to radio shack yesterday to buy new fuses, and Im as good as new. It's been 15 years since my last fuse blew.

I since have done some experimenting to try to see if I could 'clip' my speakers with other loud action movies, and couldnt. The only movie that could make my speakers clip was 'the incredibles' if I put the volume up to around +0db or higher........the other movies played just fine. Interesting eh?? Needless to say, all DVDs are not equals. It was so loud, it looked like my 65" screen was breathing and alive.........Heh
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