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Amp/Receier Help

 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2004
Hi,
I have KEF KHT 2005.2 System and Denon 3803, am not happy with that denon. Can you please some suggest some good powerful less than $1000 7.1 Amp or Receiver?

thanks in advace.

SSK.

 

New member
Username: Elitefan1

Post Number: 156
Registered: 12-2003
Try to audition the NAD753, Elite vsx53 and Marantz 7400. All very powerful and should match with your KEF's.
 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2004
Thank you Elitefan1 for your respose
 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2004
Folks,

Anyother inputs? am going to loss some money on my Denon 3803 in short period(2 Months) so next time i want to buy really good receiver. Please i need your input
 

New member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 183
Registered: 12-2003
therealitefan had given you some of the better receivers out there given the amount of money to spend. Are you looking for something else in particular?
 

Unregistered guest
SSK ,What exactly is it that makes U unhappy with your denon 3800?
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 139
Registered: 12-2003
ssk:

Like you, I have been very unhappy with my Denon 3803, and it will be leaving very soon, to be replaced by a new NAD 753 (getting it for $799), which is an absolutely wonderful receiver for your speakers. As I have said on this forum many times, the KEF system is very power hungry and the Denon simply does not put out nearly the power it is rated at. Don't know what it is, but the Denon just doesn't cut the mustard. The NAD, however, only 6.1 (I only want or need 5.1). Even so, I heartily recommend it as it has gobs of power and has a clarity that Denon engineers have not dreamed of. Just the thing for those speakers which are extremely accurate and well focused. Do you really need a 7.1 receiver?
 

New member
Username: Bigfan

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2004
i have wondered about the same question. if you intend to hook up 2 spkrs to a second zone in the future, do you need a 7 channel rather than a six channel receiver (ie denon 3803 or nad 773 instead of nad 753/763)?
 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 4
Registered: 01-2004
Thank you guys for your input

chubby: Please see the Hawk reply message to me (Denon sound is NOT good enough for KEF KHT 2005.2 speakers).

Hawk: Special Thanks to you.
Is NAD 753 7.1 Receiver?. I am looking for 7.1 Receiver and price should be less than $900. Any Idea?

When you Compare Denon Distortion level(0.004) with NAD(0.009) , NAD is high. Is it ok?
What is the channel output Watt level for NAD 753?

Thanks in advance,
SSK.

 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 5
Registered: 01-2004
Guys,

One More question? How about Yamaha RXV 1400 or 2400?
 

Unregistered guest
SSK don't worry about the distortion , some recievers have lower distirtion than others because of negative feedback( it makes the thd lower and the percentage look better on paper but it can have the adverse effect of raising the odd order harmonics(siblance,harshness). As far as the yamaha rxv1400 and 2400 I like the sound but it depends on your speakers I guess my advice would be to try them at home(if possible) along with the nad ,marantz and pioneer,most stores have a pretty liberal return policy but that way you'll know for sure if you're going to get the sound you want.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 145
Registered: 12-2003
Contrary to Hawk, I do not think the KEF KHT system is power-hungry. KEF speakers used to be inefficient, but not today, especially the KHT.
 

New member
Username: Geekboy

Post Number: 160
Registered: 12-2003
John: I don't know... the KEF KHT 2005s are listed with a sensitivity of 88dB. Now that's not 87dB definition of low sensitivity, but it is about 3dB lower than what I'd call an efficient speaker (91dB). That's already double the power requirements of a relatively efficient speaker. So if a 91dB speaker will take... 6W at 2M, then the KEF KHTs will take 12W at 2M. That's just "more" power. And as the SPL levels increase by 3dB, the power doubles, so the KEF KHTs will need twice the power of a 91dB (sensitive) speaker!

For example, I'd consider Klipsch speakers -- in general -- to be on the very efficient side of the equation. The Klipsch RF-15 are 96dB sensitivity. The Klipsch Synergy RF-2s are also 96dB. Klipsch just traditionally has had the highest sensitivity (maybe TOO much, if you know what I mean!).

Most of the speakers we purchase for home theater are in the 89dB - 91dB range of sensitivity. Anything below 88dB would be considered low sensitivity, and the KEF KHTs are at 88dB... right on the borderline.

So, relative to most other speakers (except bookshelves), I agree that a blanket statement that KEF's speakers are less sensitive than the mainstream would be wrong. But, I would go further, though, to say that the KEF KHT line is less sensitive than the mainstream (89dB-91dB) and certainly less than most of its KEF cousins (like the Reference and Qseries).

(Reference Information: I looked at the KEF KHT 2005.2 (88dB), the Reference Series Model 201 (88dB) and 207 (91dB), the Q7 (91dB), Q4 (90dB), the KHT 5005 (87dB), KHT9000 (88dB))
 

Bronze Member
Username: Johnny

Post Number: 69
Registered: 12-2003
geekboy, John A., anyone else:

This may be a really dumb question, but when you all talk of speaker sensitivity, would this be the "anechoic chamber" or "typical listening room" sensitivity. This thread got me interested to find out what my PSB Image 2B's sensitivity is...and both levels are listed. The sensitivity of the 2B is "Anechoic Chamber 89dB" and "Typical Listening Room 91dB" and the center channel 9c is "Anechoic Chamber 90dB" and "Typical Listening Room 92dB". Would this be high sensitivity or low sensitivity? I would just like to know for personal reference. Thanks guys!!

 

Bronze Member
Username: Geekboy

Post Number: 161
Registered: 12-2003
Johnny: most manufacturers only list echoic (typical listening room). My Paradigms list both (they are 91dB echoic/ 88dB anechoic). Again, most do not list both and "cheat" a little by showing the "typical listening room" (echoic). There's also differences due to absorption of the audio as well! You can lose 1dB to 2dB (maybe even 3dB) based on the room!

This sensitivity for your echoic specification is "average"... as I wrote... average is about 89dB to 91dB with the most sensitive speakers (like the Klipsch) commanding > 92dB sensitivity echoic.
 

Silver Member
Username: Geekboy

Post Number: 162
Registered: 12-2003
In general:

Sensitivity
<88dB Low
88dB-91dB Medium (average)
>91dB High
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 145
Registered: 12-2003
ssk:

I hope I can answer all of your questions--this format makes it hard to track posts sometimes.

1. No, NAD 753 is a 6.1 receiver, but you can add an outboard amp to make it a 7.1, but I am afraid that will throw you beyond your budget. However, there is one way to make one work and stay within your price range. However, it has occurred to me that you make a great system for your KEFs by getting an NAD 743 for $560 from Kiefs and add a B&K 55.2 outboard amp ($350, also from Kiefs) to drive two channels, using the pre-outs on the 743. It is designed to allow you to add an amp in this fashion to do 7.1, and it would be a wonderful system, IMO. The B&K is a wonderful amp, as is the NAD receiver.

2. Alternatively, you can hunt around for a new Marantz 7400, which I belive is 7.1. MSRP is $999, I think, but you might be able to swing a deal with a dealer to get it into your price range. Marantz sounds very good and would be another good choice for the KEFs, but it is not quite as dynamic sounding as the NAD receivers. A very nice sounding receiver, nevertheless, and not to be dismissed.

3. Neither receiver has noticeable distortion, much less high distortion. Do you remember what twice nothing is? Right--nothing. The way distortion is measured, it is so low that it cannot be heard by anyone I know, short of clipping the amp, so I would not get hung up with the distortion number. Unfortunately, audio engineers have not yet come up with a measurement of what sounds really good. We dance around it with measurements for Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) and Transient Intermodulation Distortion (TIM), etc, but none of these really describes what an amp really sounds like. If you spend a lot of time listening to different components, particularly receivers, you will hear real differences in the sound they produce. Some will sound very good and others will sound like the systems in elevators (very un-engaging). You need to find the receiver that has the type of sound that you really enjoy and want to turn on every chance you get. For me, that is an NAD. I really like the sound as I find it is more realistic and engaging than any other. For other people, such as elitefan, it is the Pioneer Elite. Other people who listen critically have other receivers that they like better, such as H/K or Rotel (were it not for the NAD, I would get a Marantz, which I like very much). So, you should try them out, if posssible, to find what sound you like. We know the Denon is not it, but there are several brands that are very good. I would be surprised if you like the Yamaha, however, since you don't like the sound of your Denon (the 1400 and 2400 sound a lot like Denon). I would say the biggest constraint is the need for 7.1 for your budget. To get 7.1 with high quality sound at $900 or less, is a tough one, IMO.

4. Today, the only number I have seen that matters is power at clipping. When a receiver promises 100 wpc and delivers only about 30 wpc, the listener knows that there is something wrong and he/she will fail to enjoy it. But beyond power, I think it is merely a question of whether you really enjoy the sound, and that is very subjective.

5. As you know, I have a 110 wpc Denon, but I have auditioned a 50 wpc NAD (model T742) and I swear the NAD has more real power. Part of this impression is because NAD conservatively rates their amps and part is that NAD has reserve power that Denon doesn't specified as "dynamic headroom." The IHF specifies dynamic headroom as the power available for a 10 ms transient burst. Most receiver makers don't bother to design this in, but NAD was the first proponent of its use in an amp and I think it makes a real difference. I know the 742's headroom is 90 wpc, so it has the juice when it is needed (an exposion on a DVD, a sudden crescendo by an orchestra on a CD, etc.). BTW, the power output for the NAD 753 is 70 wpc x 6, but the earlier model (the 752) was rated at 80- wpc x 5 and when tested by Sound & Vision, it didn't clip until 92 wpc. It had a dynamic headroom of 150 wpc. The 753 is basically the same amp, they just added one more channel. It's dynamic headroom is also rated at 150 wpc.

BTW, I really like the KEF system--I would have one with the NAD except that they are simply too small to work in my room (which is quite large).
 

Unregistered guest
SSK, theres a couple of things you need to know about reviews in magazines: A)You almost never know what size the room is(depending on the size of the room power requirements vary). B)You hardly ever know what speakers there using to listen or test with. C)power ratings really can't tell you much (dummy loads are used to test power). It's highly unlikely that all channels are going full tilt at the same time wether it be 5,6, or 7 channels. D) You don't know if the line voltage is held (some amplifiers are more sensitive to power line voltage than others,which can skew power ratings. E) any of those measurements you see in those magazines have little bearing on real world use. Theres more to amplifier(receiver)performance than measurements,some may disagree but it's true. The best thing to do is to listen to as many of the recommended receivers as you can and see which one you like best . We can all make recommendations(there all very good recommendations)but in the end it still all comes down to your ears and how each receiver interacts with you speakers and how much volume you really need. Hears the thing it's true some receivers are more powerful than others,but it doesn't mean that they sound better because they have more power.
 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 6
Registered: 01-2004
Thank you so much Hawk,chubby for your tips
My Thanks to other folks too.

Now selling my receiver is big problem. I bought for 850 two months before. I can not return it also (1 month return policy)

Hawk: KEF HKT 2005.2 Speaker is VERY good. No question about that.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 147
Registered: 12-2003
geekboy,

Well researched! You find KEF sensitivities differ across their range. I agree with all views I read in recent posts. Hawk is dead right, the main thing is steer well clear of distortion. All I want to add is people generally have more headroom that they think.

I think KEF sensitivities have also been increasing over the years. (probably true of other makers, too). My C15s (from 1990) give 85 dB. They are great; I use them for the mains (coupled with SW passive subs, which were made for them). The sweetest-sounding KEFs I own (going up to 30 kHz - almost unheard-of today in the low-mid price range) are the Corellis, from 1980. The quoted sensitivity for those is 19 watts for 96dB at 1 m & 400 Hz in anechoic conditions. It should be possible to convert to dB for 1W: I make a "guesstimate" of 83-84 dB (subtracting 3 dB for each halving of power).

Now one could call 83 dB "power hungry", and that is perhaps the KEF reputation that Hawk is well aware of. But all I am saying is that the 88 dB from a modern KEF "egg" is OK. If you say that 88 dB, today, borderline low/mid sensitivity, OK, I do not argue. But I don't think anyone should be put off, or think they need an unusually powerful amp

BTW I admit a bit of bias to KEF. One also has to consider the quality and neutrality of the sound. KEF does not play the numbers game, never did. E.g the Corellis state suitable for amps rated 20 - 50 W per channel. In fact this is a range of minima - they go on say that using a more powerful amplifier is fine, and preferable to using a a less powerful one driven to distortion to produce high volumes. They probably would not be able to sell those speakers today, where speaker "power" is a selling point. Judging from this forum alone, it seems many people think a speaker's rated power says something about how loud it plays, and should be at least equal to the power of the amp. KEF is the kind of company that could well quote the lower dB value obtained under anechoic conditions, assume that other honest manufacturers will do the same, and also assume people know that the figure does not mean much, anyway, for practical purposes.

Sorry to waffle on. Bottom line opinion.

1. I have just one KEF "Egg", for the centre. Really impressive. Consider the benefits of Uni-Q design especially for a centre speaker. I don't think I would want a full set, because I like a wider frequency range from the surrounds and especially the mains. If I were buying now I would consider the Q series.

2. If you have an active ("powered") sub, as most people do, today, it is taking away all the big demands on the power of the amp that used to be such an issue: the low frequencies take most of the Watts. A good way to appreciate this is to run your AV system with the setting "speakers small", feel how hot the receiver/amp gets, then do the same again with "speakers large". Then try "mains large; sub off". If you have full-frequency mains you or amp may get really hot. The only time I went into receiver thermal cut-out was with this setting. But you will never use this mode with a complete set of small speakers like the KEF KHT system, you will want "all small plus sub", so amp power is hardly an issue.

3. We are disagreeing only about words, really. Times change. My first stereo amp was 40W per channel and friends thought this might be signs of megalomania; 15-20W was thought quite acceptable (valve amps still have specs like this). Use one of those to drive 83 dB speakers and you won't ever get anything really loud, but you still might be surprised at the sound quality, the real issue. Funnily enough, room sizes have been getting smaller as both amp power and speaker sensitivity have been increasing. I wonder if people are slowly getting deaf?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 148
Registered: 12-2003
That was too long. Put it this way. I would not hesitate to couple the KHT 2005.2 with an NAD T742/743. If ssk wants 7.1, then a T773 would be perfect, with no reservations about power matching. The T773 would hardly get properly warm. Personally, with those speakers, I would get a T743, use 5.1, and take the two left-over eggs for stereo speakers "B"....
 

Silver Member
Username: Geekboy

Post Number: 165
Registered: 12-2003
John: I wouldn't either. :-) For most folks... even with 88dB sensitivity, 40W is fine. It's just these Home Theather (HT) folks seem to want to drive their systems to levels which I wouldn't listen to music at. I like those KEF Reference series speakers. I don't mind your bias. :-)
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 150
Registered: 12-2003
geekboy,

Thanks. In support of my theory of creeping deafness, remember the number of channels is increasing, too. Driving all seven channels of a T773 at 100 W would deafen anybody in a normal domestic listening room, even into 88 dB speakers!

Serious rock bands in the days of Cream and the Beatles would use Marshall 100W amps. Douglas Adams had a nice take on where bands are now with his fictional band "Disaster Area". Their performances often contravened planetary arms limitation treaties, and were best witnessed 37 miles from the stage, in concrete bunkers.
 

Silver Member
Username: Geekboy

Post Number: 166
Registered: 12-2003
John wrote: Their performances often contravened planetary arms limitation treaties, and were best witnessed 37 miles from the stage, in concrete bunkers.

Now that's funny! :-) I don't know what happened to my ears recently, but I was, at first, listening to movies at -15dB on my H/K AVR-525. The last two movies I watched, it was at -30dB to -25dB and I thought it was loud. As you write, we don't need all that power... unless we're competing with the neighbor's system. :-)
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 152
Registered: 12-2003
geekboy,

Thanks. But it wasn't me, it was him:

http://www.douglasadams.com/creations/hhgg.html
 

Doug
Unregistered guest
I would like to play computer MP3s over a hardwired connection on my home theater receiver, which will be, after Feb 4th, a P.E. 55TXi. This will require 66 feet of cabling. I have an Audigy 2 platinum soundcard on the computer. Which is the best connection to use? At both ends I have firewire, optical, USB, & analogue audio. I don't really want to buy a custom cable and then find it doesn't work. Fire wire would be nice but I am sceptical that it will work. Anyone with some experience on this? USB would be ok , but can it work over 66' What would be a length of cable limit for USB? Although the 'puter does USB 2, I suspect the receiver does only USB 1. With this cable I could also send photos and video to the home theater area. Third choice would be optical, which should not object to the distance, but will only carry audio. Any advice on cabling? Thanks.
 

New member
Username: Ssk

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2004
Guys,

Let me thank you guys first all your feedback.
Can you please let me know where i can sell my Denon 3803? I have to take some loses.

Thanks,
SSK.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Post Number: 158
Registered: 12-2003
Audiogon.com or ebay are two good places to sell equipment.
 

New member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 5
Registered: 01-2004
I think that Hawk is mistaken regarding NAD T743 and 7.1 capability. The T743 is only a 5.1 system. It does not decode 6.1 or 7.1, and only has 5 channels of pre-amp outs (plus two subwoofers). You thus cannot add a stereo power amp and get 7.1 from this system. The T753, on the other hand, can do this.
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 159
Registered: 12-2003
Goose:

You got me on the last one, but I double checked and I know I am right here. I have a copy of the press release issued at CEDIA last September when they announced the 7x3 line of receivers. In describing the 743, it says specifically that the 743 has 7.1 Analog input (for DVD-Audio) and can decode 7.1 formats for 7.1 output using the internal 5 channel and with an external amp for the additional channels.

It was the 742 that was limited to 5 channel output.

Cheers!
 

New member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2004
Well, Hawk, all I know is that press release is not consistent with what NAD has on its web site:

* Dolby Digital, DTS, Prologic II, EARS and Enhanced stereo
* 5.1 analog input (for DVD-Audio)
* preamp outputs for all 5.1 channels (2 subwoofers)

That is, no 6.1 or 7.1 modes. The back-panel diagrams in the product literature are also consistent with this description.

Anybody know for sure which is right?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Wilky

Post Number: 15
Registered: 01-2004
This is how the web site reads:
743:
Preamp Outputs for all 5.1 channels (2 Subwoofers)
"With the T 743, NAD has made it easy to add more speakers for listening to music in additional rooms. A second pair of speakers can simply be added to the front channel amplifiers and switched on or off from the remote control or front panel switch. There are also 12V triggers to automatically switch similarly equipped source components on and off."

753:
Preamp Outputs for all 7.1 channels (2 Subwoofers)
With the T 753, NAD has made it easy to add more speakers for listening to music in additional rooms or "zones". A second pair of speakers can simply be added to the front channel amplifiers and switched on or off from the remote control or front panel switch. More elaborate systems can also be created using the Multi-Source output to add additional amplifiers and speakers with the added benefit of independent source selection and volume control. A separate second zone remote is included. There are also 12V triggers to automatically switch remote zone amplifiers on and off.

???
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 160
Registered: 12-2003
Goose:

I will resolve this tomorrow by dropping by my local NAD dealer and I will see for myself. No question, we have both approached this issue in good faith and it is simply a question of which is right--the press release I have or the product description from the NAD website (which is somewhat vague on the issue). It is merely a question of fact. I am rather intrigued by the question now.

In any event, thanks for the input. Even if I have a good basis for my idea, if the facts are otherwise, I want to know.
 

New member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2004
I would be thrilled if my reading of the web-site is wrong. If the T743 is more capable than I thought then I might just have to buy one, and save having to explain to my wife why I need to spend more for a T753, on top of convincing her that grey is good (but she refers to my existing NAD stereo gear as "black", so I don't hold much hope on that last point).
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 156
Registered: 12-2003
I think the NAD T7x3 range has just re-introduced "speakers A" and "speakers B" across the range, and for two-channel stereo. "Speakers A" would by default be the mains which you also use for 5.1 (T743) up to 7.1 (T773). Whatever you choose to give "Speakers A", you can also give to "Speakers B", or both A and B, if you like.

I think that is the most useful thing, and a good move by NAD.

T743 (N America version):

Input/ouput

In-out

Speaker terminals

Speakers
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 167
Registered: 12-2003
Goose:

Unfortunately, you were right and the press release I have relied upon for info is wrong. I went to a local (well, about 15 miles away) dealer and confirmed it only has 5.1 in and is limited to 5.1 formats (Dolby Digital, DTS, Dolby Pro Logic II), and their proprietary EARS format, contrary to the information in the NAD press release (written by a PR firm). So, my idea of adding an outboard B&K amp to get 7.1 will not work for SSK.

BTW, I would describe the new line of NAD gear as light to medium grey. It is not as dark as the older stuff.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 161
Registered: 12-2003
I posted the picture of the in/out terminals from the T743 information sheet to try to help. I must admit I do not understand the three "MAIN IN" terminals. They seem to be connected in some way with "AUDIO PRE-OUT". What is "MAIN IN" for? There appear to be three - L, R and CENTER.

And is "DISC" a stereo phono input? Long overdue, if so!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 11
Registered: 01-2004
Hawk: I knew it was too good to be true. I had to laugh, though, when you added that your local dealer was 15 miles away. My nearest dealer is a 2 hour drive in good weather, and it is snowing up here these days ...

John A.: the MAIN IN connections are simply inputs to the power-amp section. You normally connect the audio PRE OUT to these, but could, for example, redirect the pre-out to another, more powerful amplifier, and use built-in amplifiers to amplify something else. NAD has long done this sort of thing - if memory serves, my first NAD, a 3020B, had this capability.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 162
Registered: 12-2003
Goose. Thanks. That explains why they are connected. But I wonder why there are no power-amp in connections labelled SURR-L and SURR-R?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 14
Registered: 01-2004
My (cynical) guess is that the T743 is bottom o' the line, so some features are deliberately omitted to keep costs down, and to differentiate between it and higher models.

Oh, and I think the DISC input is just for CD.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 165
Registered: 12-2003
Goose,

Yes. I agree. My earlier NAD receiver has inputs right there, but they are labelled "CD".

Having read your excellent stuff here and on frequencies, let me offer a gratiutous comment. You would be at home with an NAD, colour or not. There's just something there in the sound. And NAD treat you like an intelligent person, there is no bull anywhere in specs or user manuals. They are the first maker I know who state the analogue interconnects for DVD-A are an agreed industry format, not a technical necessity.

Also, I think the sound of the T743 will be as good as anything, bottom o' the line or not. I also like the "Stereo direct" idea.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 16
Registered: 01-2004
Thanks for your comments. This site has been a valuable resource in my quest for knowledge, so I am glad that I can "give something back".

I do believe that I would be very at home with a NAD. I have used NAD for a long time, but I have undertaken to investigate silver options to satisfy my wife. But if the answer at the end is still NAD, then NAD it shall be.

So in recent weeks I have pored over various web-sites, especially the NAD site and in particular their lower receiver models (the higher ones being well out of my budget). So it's not that I know more about all this stuff than you, Hawk, I just obsess about this sort of thing!

By the way, do my eyes deceive me or are the new models lacking the green power button?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 166
Registered: 12-2003
The green power button is still there. It is a dull green, as before. On the web site you can roll-over "Titanium finish not available in North America" and see the two finishes. Personally I prefer grey.

I also see the T533 DVD-V/DVD-A/CD player is finally available in my neck of the woods. It has component video out. Hurrah. Only absence of DVI makes me hesitate. Not that I can use that at present, but it is clearly the way things going.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Goose

Post Number: 27
Registered: 01-2004
I can clearly see the green on the T7x2 models, but on the T7x3 models it just looks black to me. A minor quibble, of course, but I like the little accent of colour that the green gives.

I just wish that titanium finish was available in Canada. I do have relatives in England and Australia, but I expect that exchange rates, duties, and technical considerations would make importing one a troublesome prospect at best.

I did look a little into the silver-finished L70 DVD Receiver, but it is more expensive here than buying a T743 plus a T513, and offers less for the money.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 168
Registered: 12-2003
Yes, it does not look so green in the graphics. But in the pdf info sheet the picture is greyscale. I will have a look next time I pass my local dealer.

In UK and Australia the standard power supply is 220/240 V, 50 Hz, as opposed to 120 V, 60 Hz in N America and Japan. I do not know if the same unit accepts both. If not, you could get a transformer, but that is not an elegant solution. You would also lose switched power outlets. The AM stepping frequencies are different, too, but these are switchable on the receiver. It would be safer to get a N America model.
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