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Twilight of the CD, Part II

 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 153
Registered: Feb-04
I would have posted this in John A's thread "Twilight of the CD...?" but that has become Kegger's thread (not that I'm complaining, because it's a very interesting thread).

I just want to share one of the consequences of listening to DVD-As and SACDs. Once you've heard these hi-res formats, it's tough going back to regular CDs. I tried listening to one of my favorite CDs over the weekend, Bernstein's recording of Mahler's Sixth on DG. This is certainly not a reference quality recording, but I never had complaints about the sound quality...until now. I couldn't enjoy it after listening to other classical music on SACD/DVD-A. In fact, I think the only classical CDs I'll be able to enjoy now are the once that have reference quality sound. Now I'm looking to replace some of my favorite classical CDs with the new hi-res versions. From now on, all new classical recording purchases will be SACD or DVD-A.

Wondering if others are experiencing the same phenomenon.

(CD sound quality seems more tolerable with non-classical recordings. I was able to enjoy Tori Amos' "Under the Pink" and a poorly recorded Jolie Holland "Catalpa" over the weekend no problem.)
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 744
Registered: Dec-03
I am experiencing exactly the same phenomenon, as you probably know, 2c. One of my "reference" CDs was also Mahler, Rattle/CBSO No.1, 20-bit recording. EMI. It now sounds washed-out and lacking in detail, like an over-exposed photograph.

I shall not buy another CD unless there are very special considerations. My order of preference is DVD-A -> LP -> CD -> MP3.

BTW Kegger has done a great thing with the other thread. Endless good recommendations of movies, music, and even beers. I intend to post back there about The Last Waltz, purchased today.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 155
Registered: Feb-04
John A.,

It looks as if we're on the same journey. Your order of preference is identical to mine, except I would sneak in SACD after DVD-A :0) To give you an idea of how much the hi-res formats are slow to be adopted, I recently read that LPs currently outsell SACDs and DVD-As!

I look forward to reading your review of The Last Waltz. I have it in my rental queu at Netflix because of all the discussion here.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 62
Registered: Dec-03
Is this difference due to stereo vs. multi-channel.

In my stereo comparisons with Hybrid SACD's I don't hear a big difference. Now my Arcam CD player totally outclasses my Pioneer DVD player as far as price and build ($1900 vs $400), so it may not be a fair comparison. I can switch from CD's, SACD's, LP's without noticing that much. That may say that SACD (and DVD-A)will allow cheaper machines (playing hi-rez formats) to compete with more expensive CD players.

John-A and $0.02, do you think you might feel differently if you used, an Arcam, Classe', Ayre, or any other player that has been optimized to play CD?
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 156
Registered: Feb-04
Ben,

I use a California Audio Labs DX-2 CD player, which may not be as good as the Arcam player but certainly does not give up much to the best CD players IMHO. Compared to the Denon 2200, the CAL is noticeably better when playing CDs. When playing a well-recorded SACD or DVD-A on the Denon player, the sound is better than a reference quality CD on the CAL player. I've posted elsewhere about the sonic differences, especially in the fullness of sound, the level of detail, dynamic range, the warmer tone, and most importantly, the air around the notes that makes it sound more like live music. I also think the superior qualities of the hi-res formats are increased when listening in multi-channel mode.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 746
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

Your question is a good one. Rick Barnes asked a similar one after my post about DVD-A on the NAD T533. Rick now says he has a CA Azur DVD-A player on order, so let's see what he says.

My answer has to be "don't know, but don't think so". If someone will lend me a high-end CD player I'll check it out. I am not a dealer, or a professional audio commentator, just a guy with a lot of commitments who still likes music and accurate sound reproduction. For what I can afford, the move to DVD-Audio has been a major step forward. I think I would never get the same sound from any CD player, still less one costing as little as that ($300 or so I think).

I read some magazines with articles by guys who seem, to me, to know what they are talking about. The current HiFi News has a review of the latest Sony SACD/Cd player. It is a serious machine. Their parting shot is "If DVD-A leaves you cold, and if you are really sure you want to buy one last CD player, this has to be a something to consider". Or similar.

Then again, you should try to compare your Arcam CD player with the Arcam DiVA DV79. I do not think it is only at the low-to-mid price range that DVD-A would win.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 63
Registered: Dec-03
I beleive if I compared a DV-89 with DVD-A to CD on the same recording on my CD-92T, the DVD-A should win (assuming both came from the same remastering session) by a good margin. The same should hold if I used a top of the line Sony ES, Denon, or Marantz SACD player.

I was just saying, as I have said before, you can get fantastic sound from a CD. You can also get bad sound (mostly from late 80's - early 90's mastering). If you buy new releases, like I do (I am buying the new Loretta Lynn tomorrow), you will probably get a well recorded, mixed, and mastered produst.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 158
Registered: Feb-04
Ben,

Agreed. There are some CDs that sound terrific. Just about any Patricia Barber CD, recordings on the Linn, BIS, and Chesky labels, just to name a few. All of these CDs sound better than some poorly recorded/remastered DVD-As I've listened to. Unfortunately, it's been my experience that these CDs are more the exception than the rule.

Also, I've compared German pressed LPs of Fleetwood Mac and Pink Floyd albums to the CD versions and the vinyl actually sound better to me. I'm sure that's debatable and I really won't question another person's preference for the CD versions. And there are knowledgable people on this board who can provide data showing that CDs are more accurate than LPs (Are you listening, Mr. Stern?) I just go by what my less-than-perfect ears tell me.

I just bought Pink Floyd's 30th anniversary hybrid SACD of DSOTM, so will do some more comparisons. But the important thing is enjoying the music. My original point is that now I've listened to good SACD and DVD-A discs, it's hard to go back to CD.

BTW have you done any extensive listening of SACD/DVD-A discs on a multi-channel system? I was skeptical at first, but now have been completely converted.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 782
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents.

re Apr 26. "The Last Waltz" is marvellous. Lots to say. Just watch it. It is so good!

All the best.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 64
Registered: Dec-03
Last Waltz is OK. It proves that if there is a truckoad of blow backstage (and there was!), all the stars will come out on Thanksgiving. If you like the music, your best bet is to buy the CD boxed set.

I would say that the Led Zeppelin DVD, Pearl Jam Live at the Garden, Jeff Buckley Live in Chicago, and Red Hot Chili Peppers Live at Slade Castle (I was there so it is cool to be able to relive) are the best concert DVD's that I have seen. I hear the NIN is good with neat features, but I haven't seen it. I also hear U2 live at Slade Castle is very good.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 65
Registered: Dec-03
oops, I meant Slane Castle.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 472
Registered: Dec-03
Ben--

I think all those stars could afford their own blow. I doubt Dylan, Van Morrison, Neil Young, etc. showed up because of drugs.

I own the DVD-V, the DVD-A, and the cd boxed set. But there is something about seeing the perfromances that captures more of the electricity of the great performances, the top drawer musicianship, and the wonderful vocals and harmonies.

Obviously everyone has different musical tastes. Certainly Flea is a great bass player, but Anthony Kiedis is a fine performer with a rather limited vocal ability. Jeff Buckley has a great voice, but the band isn't up to his level. And speaking of bands on mind alterring drugs, Led Zeppelin performances were rarely tight--they were more cathartic for their fans.

Bruce Springsteen Live in NY (at Madison Square Garden) is a great tight and exciting performance. A wide-ranging example of a rock and roll revival meeting.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 66
Registered: Dec-03
There was an article that I read about the making of the last waltz and how it looked like Christmas back stage. Basically the concert was a big party for the musicians. They got lucky it came out as well as it did.

I mentioned the Chili Peppers DVD because I was in Ireland last August, drunk on Heiniken and watching the show. It is a nice momento.

If you see the Zeppelin DVD they were tight...esp the 1969 concert when Plant had his full voice. I had been burnt out on Zeppelin thanks to AOR radio, but I was wowed by this DVD.

The problem with Springsteen DVD is that he and the boys are past their prime. Plus, I hate his wife. I want to see a 1976 concert with a hungry Bruce and E Street Band. Listen to the 70's material on his live box...big difference.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 159
Registered: Feb-04
You wouldn't know Springsteen was past his prime judging by the MSG peformance. He leaves it all out there. Not sure if the same can be said about the band. The first time I saw him was back in 1980 and the E Street Band definitely seemed more lively back then. It's the only concert I've been to where the security guards were dancing in the aisles. Anyway, Live in NYC is the best concert DVD I've seen in terms of overall quality of performance and audio and video quality.

Re: Last Waltz. I haven't seen it since about 1980 but plan to re-watch it soon. I read that Neil Young was boomps-a-daisy stoned during the concert. And Van... he is the man who gave us "Stone Me" after all. Hey, they're still alive and going strong. Reminds me of the Lily Tomlin line, "Reality is for people who can't handle drugs."
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 793
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,
"The problem with Springsteen DVD is that .... I hate his wife".
You are trying to get in on the act.
I back off from Rock competely when I hear, or read, remarks like that. The worst self-regarding cr*p in the classical world (and there is some) would not produce such a reaction.
My judgement is that The Band would never have thought of such a thing. They could take anyone for who they were. Muddy Waters, Emmylou Harris, Ringo Starr.
What has drugs got to do with it?
Best.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Docdat

CopenhagenDenmark

Post Number: 45
Registered: Apr-04
Which version of the Last Waltz would you guys recommend the most? DVD-A or DVD-V?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 794
Registered: Dec-03
Adam,
The video footage was priceless, imho. If you don't like it, you can always close your eyes. Gregory has all versions, see his post Apr 30.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 67
Registered: Dec-03
I don't mean I don't like his wife personally. The E Street band that I like to remember is the one with out her in it. It is also the one that I would buy a DVD of.

I don't understand what you are saying, John. My point was that if asked to reccomend live concert DVD's, the Last Waltz and Springsteen in NYC would not be on the top of my list. I believe that content of albums and videos is far more important than great 5.1 sound and perfect picture. I could also add that I would reccomend Gimmie Shelter over those two DVD's, as well.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 68
Registered: Dec-03
Adam,

I would rent the DVD and then make your decision.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 797
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

"The Last Walz" seems, to me, like an impossible act to follow. We have "The Song Remains the Same" (is that the Led Zeppelin DVD you mean?) but I haven't watched it, and will now check it out, thanks.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 69
Registered: Dec-03
"The Song Remains the Same" is not the DVD I was referring to. Led Zeppelin put out a 2 disc set titled DVD. It has concert peformances througout their career...including a 1969 concert.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 473
Registered: Dec-03
To me, the only thing missing from "The Last Waltz" was more concert footage and more Band songs. The Band (mostly Robbie Robertson) wrote so many great songs that I wish the movie went 5 hours. I certainly never heard Led Zeppelin play anywhere near as tight as The Band --and I have seen The Song remains the Same. I thought it was fairly sloppy, with annoying pseudo-psychodelic camerawork.

Luck is usually the residue of hard work, great chops, and professionalism. The Band and most performers on the Last Waltz had all the above.

Coked up or not, Neil Young's performance of "Helpless" was GREAT and the Band back-up and harmonies were superlative. No doubt, if you look carefully you can see a spot of white powder just inside of his left nostril :-)

"The Kids Are Alright", by the Who was better than most concert films--but it still had quite a few flaws too. But it is great for a fan.

"The Last Waltz" and "Springsteen in NYC" can be seen by anyone with a rudimentary interest in rock music and greatly enjoy the performances. Many of the other performance films by Led Zep, The Rolling Stones, and others are mostly for fans of the groups--as most of the performances and much of the camerawork is rather slipshod and rarely allows the viewer to feel part of the concert. Most rock concert films are for fans that forgive the sloppiness because the music fires up their fond memories of past records and life experiences to where that music was the soundtrack. But to people not emotionally tied to that band or performer, what is great about it is rarely apparent.

Ben--

You basically said so yourself--you remember the concert fondly because you were drunk on Heineken. Like Deadheads who vaguely remember the pink acid they took--but figured they must have had a great time:-) Like the party we attended and got drunk at and had all kinds of wonderful conversations how we would change the world, ourselves, and other amazing plans. Of course, we woke up hung over the next day and never followed through ---sigh....
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 807
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

I got ten minutes into "The Song Remains the Same", and gave up, for more or less the reasons Gregory describes. It distilled the cr*p parts of the 60s, to me.

Gregory,

I was right in middle of the category you describe, not emotionally tied up with anything in The Last Walz. But I would now defend it, from any point of view. Thanks again!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Docdat

CopenhagenDenmark

Post Number: 46
Registered: Apr-04
John,

Ok, the DVD-V version is a lot cheaper here too. I just wondered if the audio quality was much better on the DVD-A, but I guess not?

 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 811
Registered: Dec-03
Adam,

No idea, sorry. I would guess not. Of course, the original was stereo. The rebuilt 5.1 on the DVD-V sounded good to me, but I wasn't listening out for the sound! Gregory will know.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 70
Registered: Dec-03
You are bringing up wrong Zeppelin DVD. It would be like me saying The Last Waltz was bad because I didn't like their Live at the New Orleans Jazz Festival DVD.

Greg,
Unless you were at Slane with me, you don't really know what happened, who played, and what it was like. Obviously, the Chili Peppers set was good enough for them to release is on DVD. All in all, it was a great concert from Morcheeba to RHCP. I'm glad I have a piece of it captured on DVD.

My guess is most people buy music DVD's due to who is on them. I don't expect many non-Springsteen fans would enjoy watching one of his concerts no matter how well it was recorded. The Last Waltz is a good film and it has received universal acclaim. The same can be said for Gimmie Shelter. To me, it comes down to who I like better...Mick and The boys in their prime!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 891
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

I was clear about the Led Zeppelin DVD you recommended. I was not commenting on that, I have not heard/seen it. It is really just called "DVD"? If so, we should pin any misunderstanding on Led Zeppelin, I think! I only mentioned "The Song Remains the Same", which is the title of another LZ DVD, because we have it. I will look out for "DVD".
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 75
Registered: Dec-03
John A,

There is a two disc set simply titlied "DVD" it came out a year, or so, ago whetn the live CD "How the West Was Won" came out (which is excellent and can be had on DVD-A). I had witten them off until I heard this stuff. A major improvement over "When the Song Remains the Same". Finally good LZ live material from the 70'S. TSRS has always been considered an average Zeppelin performance made worse by the ridiculous fantasy scenes. I believe Zeppelin didn't even want to release the movie and shelved it for several years.

I honestly believe that "DVD" is one of the best music DVD's I have seen. I also like LZ better than The Band so I am coming from a different point of view..
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 896
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

Thanks. That is a good recommendation. I'll look out for it. My wife is the LZ fan, and the kids got her TSRTS. Nice thought, but not a great disc. Sounds like I should look out for "DVD" instead, or maybe tip the kids off, I would not wish to upstage them.
 

Silver Member
Username: Gman

Mt. Pleasant, SC

Post Number: 491
Registered: Dec-03
Ben--

I like a number of Led Zep recorded songs. I will definietly peruse the other DVD recordings. I was just disappointed with TSRTS. I hope it isn't just the fact that some of the best LZ recordings are so multi-tracked (particularly with guitars) that I wonder if it is possible for them to have a truly great live performance. If you say it is--I will certainly make a point of finding it.

I guess, one of the great things about the Band was their live performances were often as good or better than the recordings--maybe because they didn;t require much layering of the same instruments. They also had an advantage of having 3 great vocalists, plus one good one. And they all were very good to great on their instruments--and all played more than one instrument. They were just a multi-faceted and multi-threat band. Obviously I understand that people prefer different music and different styles. Vive la difference. But I look forward to listening to the other LZ DVD's and others by different artists--particularly interested in Jeff Buckley. I always loved his voice and thought his version of Leonard Cohen's--Hallelujah was the best ever done--nevermind 3 or 4 other songs on Grace, which were beautiful.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Black_math

Post Number: 76
Registered: Dec-03
THe Zep DVD has five hours of footage, but to me, the best is the concert from 1970 at Royal Albert hall. It captures Zeppelin hitting their stride, before excess came into their stage show. Robert's voice was incredible in 1970. The rest is various footage from 4 or 5 other shows throughout their career so you can definately see how his voice changed over time.

The Buckley DVD is very good and he does Halleujah to close his set.

Of course, if you like The Band, "The Last Waltz" is definately the way to go.

Actually, I wish they would do a deluxe DVD version of "The Concert for Bangladesh".
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 904
Registered: Dec-03
Ben,

That sounds miles better than TSRTS. I will definitely look out for it. Also, I do not think even my wife cared for the TSRTS, but did not wish to dissappoint people. That "DVD" sounds much more like the real thing. Definitely on the list, now. Thanks!
 

New member
Username: Asimo

Post Number: 2
Registered: Apr-04
Thanks for Ghia that directed me to the 'Twilight of CD' thread about the Mahler discussion.
While reading the long but very interesting essays I found that the thread is closed but I see all the participants are in this thread.

John A Two Cents Jan Vigne

I also think that Mahler is a wonderful post romantic composer. Mahler was the first composer that attracted me years ago after listening to the classical composers like Beethoven, Schuman and Hayden. There was some magic and mysterious in his symphonies. I like most the symphonies No 4 No 3 No 2 and No1 in this order more or less.
For years Mahler remained my favorite representative for the 20th century classical music composer with the addition of few Bruckner symphonies.
Years have passed and I found some other 20'th century composers like Rachmaninoff Shostakovich and Prokofiev to be more specific:
Shostakovich: symphonies No 5, No 7 "Leningrad", No 8 and No 13 "Babi Yar" (I agree with Jan Vinge about the conflict of Shostakovich with the regime and its influence on his music)
Rachmaninoff: Piano concerts, Preludes-Etudes and Vespers
Prokofiev: Piano works, "Angle of fire" and "War and peace" operas.

About Wagner:
A friend of mine, an opera addicted claims that it is impossible to listen to Wagner operas music without watching the scene. I do not agree. I do listen to Wagner operas highlights but you come to appreciate Wagner only by watching his long and prolong operas.
I belong to a DVD opera watching club where we gather every two weeks to watch some opera and Wagner is very interesting operas composer in our group schedule.
As an Israeli's we have a dilemma whether to play Wagner in public or not. I myself think that it is not necessary to perform Wagner in public at Israel. You can play whatever you like privately.

How all this is connected to "The twilight of CD '?

We are with the stereo mode for more than 50 years now. The stereo proved to be good and reliable. I think that a 60th system composed from Quad tube amplifier, Thorens turntable and Quad or KEF speakers is equal or even better than many modern stereo Hi-End systems.
Is it time to abandon the stereo and switch to something new like multichannels audio with three four or five speakers around us?
I know that in our opera club meeting we listen to a good DVD player, a moderate projector connected to good stereo systems with very good results.
We DO NOT operate the Dolby 5.1 surround or DTS, anyhow many operas on DVD do not have it
I would like to have the forum member experience with classical music DVD-A or SACD before changing my stereo and the awalability of music in this formats.




 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 909
Registered: Dec-03
Asimo,

Many thanks. I am at work right now. I just wanted to say that the thread The twilight of the CD...? is not closed (I thought the same at first), they have just archived the first 100 posts. If you wishes to re-post there, it might make some sense, because the context will be clearer to everyone. I shall reply, wherever, but it will take a day or two. BTW I agree, mostly, and think you might also enjoy Teaching an old dog new tricks....

Sorry to be brief. I promise to respond over the weekend.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 175
Registered: Feb-04
Asimo,

Thanks for your contribution to the discussion. Although I'm not a big fan of Wagner, I find it encouraging that Israelis listen to Wagner. It shows me that there are some things that transcend political correctness.

I agree that some some stereo systems from 30 or 40 years ago sound as good as some high-end systems of today. My introduction to hi-fi equipment was through a friend who had Klipschhorn speakers driven by a Macintosh tube amp. I was captivated by the sound and have heard few systems since that sounded as magical as his system (perhaps I'm hindered by the fog of memory). Anyway, you asked whether it is time to adopt a new multi-channel format. My answer is, absolutely! A well-recorded SACD or DVD-A disc is as about as close to listening to a live performance as you can get now. You can really appreciate it when listening to large orchestral works, including, I'm sure, opera. In addition to a fuller, more detailed sound with a warmer tone than CD, these hi-res formats convey the atmospheric and spatial qualities of the rooms they were recorded in. I would encourage you to explore these new formats, especially if you are unable to listen to live performances. As I have mentioned a few times in other posts, one of my favorite classical DVD-As is a performance of Mahler's 2nd symphony by Zubin Mehta conducting the Israeli PO. This would be a good test to hear the benefits of a hi-res, multi-channel recording.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 919
Registered: Dec-03
Asimo,

"would like to have the forum member experience with classical music DVD-A or SACD before changing my stereo".

You don't have to change it. Just add to it! See the link "Teaching an old dog new tricks". I have just discovered DVD-Audio, and it is well worth it. And especially with those sort of musical preferences. Also opera, I should think, where surround sound must surely add something to DVD-D. I have never got into opera. Maybe one day.

You are completely correct about 40-year old stereo gear, in my opinion. My position on DVD-Audio is that it is the first really new and useful development, for music, since the introduction of stereo.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Maroonmike

Dixie, USA

Post Number: 20
Registered: May-04
I have just joined the ranks of DVD-A and SACD and it is a new world of music. I cannot believe the difference of these formats in surround mode. I can tell a difference in these vs. DTS 5.1 surround recording (must be the "lossy" factor of DTS.) I have a really hard time listening to CD's now...and I just got a NAD C542 cd player....doh!

The best sounding disc I have heard is Toto IV in SACD surround. If you are somewhat, maybe, might-be okay with their early-80's music, pick up this disc (be sure to get the surround one.) The surround mix is excellent and the sound quality is superb.

 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 502
Registered: Dec-03
glad to see more joining the ranks maroon.

good stuff aye!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1510
Registered: Dec-03
Good on you, Kegger.

MaroonMike,

Great. And you were one of the skeptics, quite rightly, too, as I recall! We can't believe most of what we read about audio, so it is common sense to be critical.

Welcome aboard!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Maroonmike

Dixie, USA

Post Number: 21
Registered: May-04
Thanks.

Is there any place that will tell me what records are scheduled for DVD-A or SACD releases? I hope we have more artists and options soon.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1516
Registered: Dec-03
Maroon,

There are some reviews on

http://www.highfidelityreview.com/

also links to disc manufacturers'/recording companies' sites etc.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 244
Registered: Feb-04
For SACD reviews and news, try www.sa-cd.net
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 157
Registered: Apr-04
MaroonMike,

Acoustic Sounds usually lists "coming soon" and new releases separately from their usual catalog listings. JohnA and 2C's recommendations are good ones too. I'm finding that it is sometimes necessary to use several resources to find out what's out there.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Ojophile

Toronto, ON

Post Number: 27
Registered: Jun-04
There are also DVD-A and SACD reviews on AudioVideoRevolution, if you're interested.

Cheers,
Don
 

Bronze Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 96
Registered: Jun-04
Here's another link:

http://www.digitalaudioguide.com

But before visiting all those sites you might like to check out this one:

http://www.safer-networking.org/en/spybotsd/index.html

Safe surfing
AL
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 101
Registered: Jun-04
John, have you checked out "coming releases" in link posted by Ghia? 69 SACD versus 8 DVD-A. Maybe it's time for that final investment...

Don't get me wrong, latelly I have inclined in favour of DVD-A. I find it richer in musical detail. But on the other hand for me the choice between PCM and DSD depends pretty much on which kind of music, and in which listening mood I am.

BTW: Coming CD releases = 4 items. Are we finally rid of...?

Hasta pronto
AL
 

Gold Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 1313
Registered: Dec-03
i want to know when the AC/DC surround disks come
out darnit!
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 105
Registered: Jun-04
It's not hi-rez, but it's already out:

http://www.crabsodyinblue.com/acdctoronto2003.htm

God save your neighbours
AL
 

Gold Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 1334
Registered: Dec-03
thanks for the link lar. looks cool.

but i'd just like to have 1 high rez disk from "MY" band.
preferably surround!
 

Gold Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 1335
Registered: Dec-03
woops sorry arnold i meant you buddy.
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 109
Registered: Jun-04
Before, I had my doubts considering bulldozer rock and hi-rez. But after hearing Stevie Ray Vaughan on SACD, I gave it another thought. There's really an extra kick in the riffs. I mean, on CD it sounds like every guitarrist in the world uses a small solid-state amp. I have one of those now, but when I was a teenage- wannabe-punkrocker we used to rent Marshall stacks for the gigs. So this comes from a reliable source: Hi-res rulez.

On DVD-A, I am truly impressed by the guitars on Hotel California (title track). Just listen to the increased difference in tone between the two solo guitars. And I'd say the guy with the acoustic steelstring has grease on one of his fingers. Anybody noticed that on CD edition (super-grin)?

Mr. K., a curiosity: In Leganes town outside Madrid they named a street after AC/DC. So many signs were stolen by fans that they finally had to paint street name directly on buildings.

Cheerz
Señor Layne
 

Gold Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 1359
Registered: Dec-03
interesting facts their arnold.

the things you are picking out on rock albums in
the high rez. are the same type
of things i'm finding with tube amps, so the combo is truly awsome!
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 121
Registered: Jun-04
Glad to hear. For me hi-rez is a step in right direction. Can't be perfect by now, putting it through a basic Hi-fi Home theatre. But even at this stage it brings back some joy to listening that I never found with CD. I'm extra sensitive to guitars, since it was (is) my instrument. So many great guys out there, using the axe as if it was their voice: Peter Green, Santana, Robert Fripp. Et cetera, et cetera ..

Hasta pronto
AL
 

Gold Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 1407
Registered: Dec-03
well the latest frankenstein creation of audio is!

st-70 running mids and tweeters in a 3-way cabinet
with the se-40 running the 12" driver. and 2 channels of a rotel 3channel
amp running a pair of subs with external home made xovers.

3 amps and 2 cabinets for 2channels of music.
and the sound is the best i've heard to date.
so I guess in the end it's justified! lol

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