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Can I use my vintage Marantz receiver as a tuner w/NAD integrated?

 

tryan
Unregistered guest
I have a NAD C370 that I'm building a system around and I need a tuner. Can I run my 1978 Marantz receiver with the NAD as a tuner without hurting anything? How would I hook it up? Can I run tape out (Marantz) to Aux or tape in (NAD)? Or pre-out (Marantz) to tape/aux (NAD)? Where should volume be set on Marantz, does it matter?

I'm new enough at this that I'm not comfortable experimenting just yet...afraid I'll hook it up wrong and fry something. I could just pick up a tuner, but the Marantz unit looks so retro cool. I want to keep it "in system" if I can. Any suggestions?
 

Anonymous
 
Why not pre out (Marantz) to Tuner (NAD)?
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 348
Registered: 12-2003
tryan:

Yes, I have actually done that before, so I know it works. Simply use the Tape Out on the Marantz (unless it has pre-outs, in which case you use them) to connect to an integrated amp's Aux or Tuner input, making sure that the input selector on the Marantz is set to Tuner. A regular pair of RCA type leads will make the connection.
 

tryan
Unregistered guest
It works!! Thanks for the posts. Now, if I can figute out the best way to hook up this subwoofer???
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 363
Registered: 12-2003
tryan:

Congrats. Now, I think I can also get your sub to work. Remember, you are working with a stereo here, not an AVR, so generally, one runs a pair of speaker wires to the sub from the integrated amp and connecting to the sub's high level inputs (speaker connectors, not an RCA plug). The sub would also have a pair of output connections and you would run speaker wire from these to your speakers. This means your integrated amp is also driving the sub, bypassing any amp in the subwoofer.

However, as I recall, the NAD 370 is a very interesting unit as it has two sets of pre-outs. If you have an active sub (most people do as it means the sub has its own amp built in), you should be able to run a subwoofer cable (RCA connectors) from the left pre-out (either pre-out 1 or 2, whichever one is not used to connect the pre-amp section to the power in jacks) to the sub's line level input (an RCA type connector).

If you use the speaker wire connections, the sub's cross-over will filter out the low bass info sent to the mains so that you will not have any duplication of signal (and the main speakers should sound cleaner as they don't need to work as hard to produce the low bass). On the other hand, the advantage of using the line level connection is that the sub's amp will relieve the integrated from having to produce the power for the sub as well as the mains and you should have more flexibility to set the sub's operating paramenters.

Either way, you should be able to get the sub working in very short order.

Good luck!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 270
Registered: 12-2003
tryan,

Often I find all I can I write is "I agree with Hawk" and then maybe add a bit of extra support or detail. Here I am going to take a deep breath, and disagree.

Hawk,

Respected poster and forum friend of nearly a year: I beg to differ!

Tryan,

It may be a bit off target, depending on what you mean, by "this subwoofer". Is it active (powered)?

But whatever your sub, for a stereo amp and signal, you really should use Hawk's first recommended connection. That is, each channel of speaker output, left and right, from the amp, goes first to the corresponding speaker-level input to the sub. Then what remains of the signal (all of it except the frequencies below the sub cross-over frequency) is passed from the sub to the main speaker, via the sub's speaker-out terminal. Again, one pair of speaker cables (+ and -) for each channel. Take care to connect + to + and - to - at each stage, to preserve phase.

Now, IF you have a passive sub, THEN it is as Hawk says, your amp is driving the the sub. However, IF you have an amp in the sub (it is "active") THEN, contrary to Hawk, it is the sub's amp that drives its own built-in low-frequency driver (aka "woofer"). This is good, it takes a disproportionate power load off the stereo amplifier, which no longer has to deliver the very low frequencies. The result can be better sound from the main speakers, since the stereo amp is now doing all its work delivering power where the main speakers can use it most effectively. That is in the treble and mid-range, where lie the detail and general quality of the recorded sound. It is a bit like a painter needing a broad brush for large areas of colour, and a fine one for detail.

AV receivers and amps usually give you the possibility of connecting the sub, instead, at "line-level". This means a single co-ax cable running from a special sub channel pre-amplifier output directly to the power amplifier in the sub. This is an option only with an active sub, of course.

If, however, you have either a stereo pre-amp or an integrated stereo amp with pre-amp outputs, then, yes, you can connect one of these two line-level outputs (left or right) to the line-level input of the sub. But then the sub will reproduce only the low frequencies from that channel.

You can try that and see if you like it, but I can imagine problems, one of which will be a phasing between the LF sound from the sub and the LF sound from the speaker delivering the other channel. The only way round that I can see is if you choose "mono", either for the whole set-up, or specifically for the second pre-amp outputs. In the latter case you could choose L or R and indeed it would make no difference which.

I am not aware of any "serious" amps designed to allow separate mono and stereo pre-amp outputs, and doubt they exist, but I could be wrong.

Also, some stereo amps just might have a separate sub pre-amp out, like an AV amp, but this would be the sort of thing you would find on cheap systems with little effective power. The iMac computer I am writing on has this set-up, since the stereo power amp delivers only a few Watts per channel to the main speakers. A separate, powered "iSub" does a terrific job and improves the sound no end, but it is still, in the end, only a computer. You will be most unlikely to find a separate sub pre-amp out a serious hi-fi stereo amplifier.

Hope that helps.

If you wish to move into multi-channel surround sound while preserving the many virtues of the system you have, the solution might be to get an AV pre-amp or processor, and use the power amp stages of the Marantz and the NAD. You still have only four effective power amp stages, however, and you really need at least five.
 

tryan
Unregistered guest
Gentlemen...Thank you Hawk/John A for your posts. I've read hundreds of your posts over the past months and appreciate your willingness to provide insight...and help.

I have an HSU sub with an amp...and used the high level speaker inputs into the sub, and connected my speakers to the sub's outputs. Everything seems to work fine for now. I have to travel for a few days, so critical listening and experimentation will have to wait. Thanks again for your help!
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 375
Registered: 12-2003
John A.:

I bow to your superior knowledge! I always know if I go too far, you will correct me.

tryan:

I love Hsu subs. Glad it is working properly.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 274
Registered: 12-2003
Hawk,

Thanks. Countering the advice of Hawk is an extremely rare opportunity. And then it is only in details.

tryan,

You are already there. You did not need all that! If you have an HSU sub, connected in that way, you are doing fine.
 

Anonymous
 
Is there any way I can use my beloved old Sansui receiver (marked for 8 ohm speakers) with a brand new pair of 4 ohm speakers? I had thought I would easily replace the "old" receiver but I don't really want to.

But if I have to, any thoughts? I'm not sure if i can get a good receiver with minimum 100 watts per channel that is able to drive 4 ohm speakers. My budget (including a tuner) is $500-1000. I've heard some AVRs in stores, but they are too big, too hollow, not musical, and very expensive. If you have thoughts/suggestions on stereo receivers, I would be interested. The more specific you can be with names and models, the more grateful i'll be.
 

Unregistered guest
There is very little available today that can match an old Sansui in terms of build quality and musicality. It will drive your 4ohms (2 pair actually) with no problems. Many 8ohm speakers I've run across often test as low as 6ohms (Bose, Advent, ARs). Enjoy.
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