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Recommend a turntable

 

hounddog
Unregistered guest
What is a good turntable to play my old lp's on? Tweeter sells a Denon for about $150$$$$$ I am looking for good sound--not bells and whistles.
I need a system that has a preamp or I will have to buy one. Is there a difference between a built in preamp and one the you install inline?
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 344
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog:

Wow--what a great question! I could make any number of suggestions, but I don't know what your budget is. However, I really would seek to dissuade you from getting the Denon, unless that is the most your budget will allow.

There are several good packages that I would recommend. The first is the NAD 533 tunrtable package, which is a very good table which comes with a nice Goldring Elektra cartridge already mounted. It is available on sale from Saturday Audio (www.saturdayaudio.com) for $369.

Another very good table is the ProJect 2.1, available from several sources, but I recommend Jerry Raskin's The Needle Doctor (www.needledoctor.com) where it is priced at $319 and comes with a pretty good Sumiko Oyster cartridge. For $469, you can get a really stylish Pro-Ject RM-4 with either an Ortofon OM-10 or Sumiko Pearl cartridge.

Finally, you can also get a very good Music Hall MMF-2.1 for $269.99, also from The Needle Doctor, and it also comes with a good Goldring Elan cartridge pre-mounted at the factory. If you are inclined to spend a little more money, the Music Hall line of turntables are an excellent value in turntables and a good choice.

All of these turntables are a very good value, with suppression of vibration of paramount importance. This is what distinguishes them from the $150 Denon or Technics turntables. Vibration is the chief cause of coloration and distortion in tunrtable playback, and will diminish your enjoyment. So, I highly recommend these tables as a reasonably priced way to get into good quality turntables.

As for a phono pre-amp, I would recommend a couple that are very reasonably priced, as well. Either the Pro-Ject Phono Box or the Music Hall Phono Pack are very good pre-amps both avaialble from the Needle Doctor for ~$120. If you want to spend less, for a phono pre-amp that is very close if not equal to those two, check out the NAD PP2, which you can probably get for under $100 from Saturday Audio.

Well, I don't know if this helps, but I hope that it does. Good luck and happy listening--vinyl is a wonderful medium for music playback and I am sure that you will enjoy whatever system you end up getting.
 

hounddog
Unregistered guest
Thanks Hawk, I was thinking of the $200 range, but I don't think I've ever met budget when buying audio so I will definitely look at you suggestions. Our local Tweeter also sells a project 1.2---is that the same as the 2.1 (did you maybe just get the numbers reversed.
It appears that you think the outboard preamp is a better route that the integrated preamp????
Also, I have read that some systems have a "filter" that is supposed to suppress or filter out some of the scratching ang popping sounds from older lps???
Do these filters work, or are they just a sales gimmick??? It would be nice if they did work.
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 349
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog:

Yes, I did mean the ProJect 1.2--sorry about that! How much does Tweeter want for it? I think I got confused viz. the Music Hall MMF 2.1, which I also recommended (and which is on Stereophile's Budget Recommended Components List). However, I did a little more looking and found the Music Hall MMF-1 turntable here for $225, but I don't know if it comes with a cartridge:

http://www.hcmaudio.com/comp.asp?compID=514

In any event, I think you will get much more out of a Pro-Ject or Music Hall than the Denon.

I am very skeptical of these filters that suppress or filter out scratching and popping sounds--it is either marketing or it will have a real adverse effect on the sound. I still use an old Discwasher to clean my records and I think that product works about as well as anything in cleaning up the grit that can cause the pops, etc. It is available here for $19.95:

http://www.garage-a-records.com/access.html
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 264
Registered: 12-2003
I can't add much to Hawk's recommendations. It really does not matter where the phono pre-amp is located. You need an outboard pre-amp only to boost the signal from a turntable to an amp or receiver, where neither has a built-in phono amp. Phono cartridge outputs are just lower-amplitude signals than most other sources; they need a little extra amplification on the way in. A moving-coil (MC) cartridge has an output signal lower even than a moving-magnet (MM) cartridge: you have to choose the pre-amp setting appropriately.

Hawk is correct about filters, too. A "scratch" filter decreases the sound of any scratches on the record surface, but cuts the high frequencies in the music, too. So you are better off playing LPs that do not have scratches. Same for a "rumble" filter: - it cuts out the low frequencies. But, get a good turntable and "rumble" (which is low frequency vibration usually from the main bearing) is not a problem.
 

hounddog
Unregistered guest
Thanks to John A. and Hawk---The Pro-ject 1.2 can be bought at Tweeter for $349. I guess my next question is whether the Pro-ject is worth $100 more--well maybe 65-70 by the time shipping is figured in . Would you consider these two to be on the same level? John A.--Are you saying that the MM cartridge is better than the MC?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 265
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog,
I have read good reviews of the Pro-Ject 1.2. I believe it has a built-in phono pre-amp- if so you will not need another one. I read here the Pro-Ject is actually made in the Czech Republic. Consider the NAD turntable, too. I believe it is made for NAD by Rega, a UK turntable maker. I have inspected an NAD turntable and it clearly is in essence a Rega Planar turntable, with a glass platen and very similar-looking main bearing and drive mechanism. I have a Rega Planar 3 which has given incomparable performance for over 20 years and I recommend that warmly and unconditionally. It is a "minimalist" design for sound quality alone, without even a speed-changer (you take the platen off an move the drive belt to change between 33 and 45 rpm).

As regards MC and MM, there long been a big debate about which, if either, is intrisically better. MC cartridges tend to be more expensive. I cannot comment, except to say I do not see how the electrons know whether their conducting coil is moving or not! I think the mass of a coil that moves has to be lower than one which doesn't, which might explain the lower signal Voltage.
 

hounddog
Unregistered guest
Do the tables ya'll are recommending come ready to play without a lot of sophisticated adjustments. One Sumiko Pro-ject site said that some gauges and such were required, while other sites suggest that it comes adjusted. I need a player that doesn't require alot of adjustments as I don't have turntable tools. For me, this is a learn as I go endeavor. Thanks for the patience.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 267
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog,

You do not need special tools. But the manual should contain simple instructions about how to adjust the tracking weight, which is the effective weight of the cartridge on the Lp when it is playing. You do it by finding zero, when the arm is perfectly horizontal over the platen (no force up or down). Then you usually rotate a counterpoise weight on the other end from the cartridge, moving it in like a micrometer gauge, so the indicated number gives the tracking weight recommended by the cartridge/stylus maker. This is usually something between 1 and 1.5 grams. It is easier to do than to write. There is another simple adjustment you make called "Antiskating" which is just dialling a number on another small wheel mounted horizontally.

You can get the NAD turntable user manual from their web site (www nad.co.uk then go to "Support") if you want to see. It is not a problem, honestly.
 

Silver Member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 365
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog:

I have to agree with John A.--no matter what turntable you get, you have to balance the arm and then adjust the weight to get your tracking force to the recommended weight. Takes about 1 minute to do, even if you have never done it before. Then another ten seconds to dial in the anti-skating value and you should be ready to play a record.

The complicated stuff with turntables is mounting the cartridge so that it tracks properly. The stylus has to be aligned to the proper angle to fit into the record's grooves. When I bought my first table about 30 years ago, I had to use a bunch of complicated tools (a protractor) to align the cartridge as it did not come pre-mounted (very few did). It was a common endevour in our dormitory at university and it seemed somebody was mounting a new cartridge all the time. Fortunately, we also had a few seasoned veterans who could help out as this process was a real pain, IMO. However, today most of these tables come with cartidges pre-mounted, so none of that is a worry. They are aligned at the factory. One of the main reasons I suggested the three tables I did was because they all came with good cartridges pre-mounted so that this would not be a hassle for you.

So, as John said, you merely need to balance the arm, set the tracking force, and then set the anti-skating force. No tools required.

Enjoy!
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 269
Registered: 12-2003
hounddog,

Yes, Hawk is dead right, as usual. But even aligning the cartridge, if you need to, is no more that a minute or two of common sense and following simple, clear instructions, and you what you are doing, and why, are just common sense if you look at the arm/cartridge assembly. You are making sure the stylus is straight in the groove, and falls right into it, not trying to track the groove at an angle.

The tool you need for that is a small screwdriver, to tighten gently but firmly the little bolts holding the cartridge in its shell. You do that before adjusting the tracking weight.
 

hound+\dog
Unregistered guest
There are some really cheap phono preamps on the market---starting at $20 or so. I assume that you get what you pay for????
Also, does the preamp need be a "phono preamp"? Could I buy a preamp that could also double as something else?
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 277
Registered: 12-2003
"Could I buy a preamp that could also double as something else?"

Yes, as long as it has a phono input. This is what I do. My NAD 100 stereo pre-amp from about 1992 works fine, and you can choose between MM and MC phono input. Hawk has posted before on dedicated phono pre-amps. I have no personal experience on that one.
 

Unregistered guest
Why don't you give a consideration to a used table of higher quality? Something like a Rega Planar 2 would be a good choice as it is very simple and has not changed much in design over the last 30 years. A Planar 2 made after 1986 will have the RB-250 arm which is as good as you get in a budget design and very simple and straight forward to set up and use. Try a site like www.AudioClassics.com; they are good people to talk to and will be happy to take care of any problems you have with cartridge and set up.
 

Silver Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 671
Registered: Dec-03
Jan,

As I pointed out on Feb 27, the NAD turntable IS a Rega. It looks like the 2, but I am not completely sure. I am not sure what tonearm it has. Probably a Rega from Rega itself is better, it would be strange if it were not.

I just want to say, since DVD-Audio has convinced me that CD, all along, was a sound-compromised convenience format, I have taken to listening to LPs more.

There is higher resolution on LPs than on CDs, no question. It is such a pleasure to hear all the words, and to be able clearly and easily to distinguish different musical instruments, apart from anything else.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
im no expert on turntables, but someone told me once if you spend $200 dollars on a turntable and cartridge it will still sound better then any cd player out there, being analog the music will be warmer more tube like, there is no reason in the world to spend big money on a turntable, i spoke to a salesmen and what he told me was get yourself a decent dj table, attach a good cartridge, purchase a phono preamp and your good to go, remember the more money you spend doesn`t necessarily mean better sound, it just means different sound, if i had $5000 dollars to spend on a turntable and cartridge i`d call the needle doctor get a wonderful package deal for about $450 and have all that money left over.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
one more thing, this really cracks me up, just think a $25,000 dollar turntable to spin a $6.50 vinyl album, is this the true definition of overkill, its gotta be,,,just think if you spend that kinda money for a turntable the only person not laughing at you in that store would be the stock boy, and thats because he`s in the back sleeping somewhere, i know there are people out there with money to burn but come on guys wanna give your money away, look me up i`ll be glad to take it.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest
Mark, my advice to you is don't ever spend more than $7.50 for a bottle of wine.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1382
Registered: Dec-03
...or $50 on a guitar or violin.

Mark, where can I get a vinyl album for $6.50?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Drumsuck

St. johns, Newfoundland Canada

Post Number: 19
Registered: May-04
I have had great success with the Gemini XL-500II turntable, which is a dj model which is a copy of the Technics 1200 series, which debuted in the late 70s and are still the industry standard for direct-drive turntables. The only two undesirable qualities about the Gemini is that it has no quartz lock, which the Technics do, and the transformer is not shielded so in order to use an unshielded cartridge (such as the Grado prestige series) you'll need to add magnetic shielding. Neither of these issues are huge deals and this turntable will outperform anything in it's price category (the plastic sonys, denons, etc.)

Denon actually makes a copy of the Technics 1200 as well, if you want to spend a bit more. I've never tried it, but I'm sure it's functional.

The biggest difference in sound quality (assuming you have a reasonably well damped turntable) will be made by purchasing a high quality cartridge and a good set of cables.

Obviously the Gemini is no Rega or Pro-Ject (I intend to go for one of these next) but it's a solid first step on your way up the audiophile ladder.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
when it comes to wine, buy what you like, i can tell you one thing when i go shopping for wine the ones that are sold out are the ones that got great ratings and cost no more then 8 dollars a bottle, people are looking for deals out there do you blame them, i also play guitar and never played an old strat i liked, give me a new one anyday of the week, as far as albums go for $6.50 search the internet, you can find anything you want out there and its all at your fingertips.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
brad i just ordered a numark tt-1600 turntable, a grado black cartridge and a b-tech phono preamp, and i just know when i place my miles davis album on that platter i`ll be in anolog heaven. the best part is everything is new in boxes and cost only $144 dollars plus some s&h charges, man do i love getting a good deal, look at it this way, its easy getting great sound from expensive audio gear try getting great sound from the not so expensive stuff, do your research find the great deals buy and be happy,,,should i change my name to cheapskate audio,,,lol
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1395
Registered: Dec-03
Brad,

I had a direct-drive turntable once. It had a quartz lock, and a strobocope. It sounded like cr*p. Direct drive was a mistake, and an over-reaction to wow and flutter. Belt drive is much better design.

MARK,

I am with you. Really. I was recently offered a boxed set of five second-hand LPs from about 1980 "in good condition" for about $150. "Quick, it won't be here for long, at that price". A mint condition Sgt Pepper LP will fetch $500, so I am told.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
what i learned buying and selling on ebay,,,there is a buyer for everything and anything, i`ve seen people pay more for a used item that they could have bought new for less,,,true story i had an old mexican fender strat body in my closet, i beat the hell out of this thing burn marks dents whacked it with a hammer, you name it i did it, i was about to toss it into the dumpster when my friend said mark put it on ebay start it out at $5.00 see what happens, you know what happen it went up to $395 dollars, i was freaking out, when i wrote to the buyer asking why he paid so much for a guitar body that was made in mexico and not in the states, he simply said he thought it looked cool and wanted to own it. as far as beatle stuff goes, when i was a kid my mother bought me a beatle suit just like the ones they wore on the ed sullivan show, boy do i wish i had that today, can`t you just smell the dollar signs.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Drumsuck

St. johns, Newfoundland Canada

Post Number: 20
Registered: May-04
I don't mind the sound of my direct-drive at all. The only problem is an electro-magnetic hum which has to do with the transformer, and can easily be solved. The extreme solution would be to de-couple the transformer.

I use a Grado Prestige Black, and a Gemini turntable which is probably similar to the Numark. My receiver has a nice phono stage in it, however, which is probably a little better than the one that you're getting, but all in all I'm certain that you're going to enjoy that setup, as long as you get the cartridge properly installed. Overhang makes a huge difference.

Another sound improving suggestion that I would make would be to build an isolation platform for your 'table. I have mine on top of my stereo rack, on a 20"x15"x1.5" piece of particle board sitting on top of two concrete slabs. It doesn't do a lot to dampen vibrations (it does do a little) from the stereo cabinet to the turntable, but it does open up the sound a bit and bring out some more bass.

One of these days I'll go for a fancy Rega or something, but I'm quite content for now.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Drumsuck

St. johns, Newfoundland Canada

Post Number: 21
Registered: May-04
i just looked at that numark. It's quite a bit different than my Gemini, what with it being belt-drive and having a straight tone arm, but I'm sure if you set it up right it'll work out for you.

I sort of wish I had a Technics 1200 series. sigh.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
i ordered the numark tt-1600 it has the s shaped tone arm, the new tt-1600 mk-ll has the straight arm, i also looked at audio advisor`s web site they have a nice platform for $69 dollars, but like you suggested i might just build my own.

brad what would you suggest for and outside phono preamp, the b-tech is $50 dollars everything else is $120 that would be the sumiko, music hall, another b-tech model, the parasound, im just not sure theres a need to spend the extra money.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Drumsuck

St. johns, Newfoundland Canada

Post Number: 22
Registered: May-04
how much is the grado phono stage or the NAD PP2? I've never used any phono stage for very long, so I'm not sure exactly what's good and what's not.

a record brush (such as discwasher D4 system, or Goldring Exstatic) will make your records sound a lot better, too.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1402
Registered: Dec-03
Good luck, guys! Analogue is the true reference.

I have read good things about the NAD PP2. It is about US$100 in most places. You can get the manual (300 k pdf file) from:
http://207.228.230.231/manual/NAD-pp2.pdf
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
a record brush, almost forgot about that, needle doctor has a few to choose from, you say that will improve the sound quality, that would be a good investment then.
i should be getting the turntable this week, can`t wait, after all these years its still such a cool format.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1404
Registered: Dec-03
But don't get a "Dust bug" or anything that tracks the LP while it is playing. Mostly, if you keep LPs so the liner and jacket together seal them off from the outside (with the open end of the liner inside the sleeve), then you don't need to do much except maybe blow off any dust from the stylus after playback - the stylus cleans out the groove as it plays.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1409
Registered: Dec-03
This thread prompted me finally to post some stuff I wrote a while ago, after reading other threads under "phono".

Concerning turntables and LPs. Simple things your father knew, probably.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
hi john,,,the dust bug is that the groove cleaner that looks like a tonearm with a brush and a red wheel cleaner,,,i had one of those when i was 18 years old, god they still make that, i was just snooping around needle dr`s website and was interested in this brush Audioquest Carbon Fiber

The AQ Record Brush is about the second best record cleaner around. The vacuum cleaners from Nitty Gritty are the most effective. However, even owners of these cleaners need an AQ Record Brush to keep the dust off between cleaning

sounds good to me, that was right from the sight.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1410
Registered: Dec-03
Great, Mark. I had a "Watt's Dust Bug" once. It had little roll of velvet, you put some fluid on, as well as bristles. You could hear the bristles tracking the grooves. I always wondered how it would sound, amplified.

Record cleaners used to be a whole world of discussion and debate. I tried a number of things, but have no experience of the Audioquest Carbon Fiber Brush. Just keeping LPs clean in the first place is all you really need, I think.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
yep that must be the same one i had, i wonder if it cleaned the record or just kinda smeared the dust all over the place,,,i was just thinking when i get the turntable and play my first record the bottom end will be coming thru a subwoofer, thats a first for me, im thinking its going to be kinda cool.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1466
Registered: Dec-03
MARK,

For some reason I have only just received your June 13 post, above, by e-mail. I think Mary Quant did the Beatle suits, and the haircuts.

As regards what people will pay for things. There are people who just enjoy spending money. The more they spend, the better they feel. I always liked the license plate "California. Born to Shop".

I think most of us here assume "Recommend a turntable" means something like "in terms of value for money". That is "bang for the buck". If, however, you want the opposite, try the Blue Pearl www.bluepearlaudio.co.uk it is only £48,000. It probably sounds too good to give the best buck for the bang. You could take solid gold hammer to it, and that should deliver a really good mod.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
OK JOHN,,,now thats a turntable,,,i`d like to see a dj do some scratching on that in front of the designer,,,im thinking major stroke,,,lol.
the funny thing is i heard he built that turntable around a $13 dollar cartridge, handmade by an amishmen, made from shoe-fly pie then dipped in apple butter, talk about sweet sounding,,,lol oh im in one of those moods.
recieved my athena speakers yesterday, using them as my main speakers, they also completed my surround sound system, im watching saving private ryan right now and dodging bullets, holy surround sound batman.
 

peach
Unregistered guest
John A. If I needed a new best friend, you would be in the running. Reading your posts, I often chuckle to myself. Thanks
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1472
Registered: Dec-03
Mark,

Love it. I think the apple butter cartridge would cost more than $13.

A poster on another thread (Ghia Cabriolet) was seriously (I think) passing on the story that certain JVC speakers have cones soaked in sake. I suggested, for the best sound, the sake should be traditionally brewed, from organically-grown rice. You would also have to pay careful attention to the soil and weather conditions, so it would be safest to stick to that one part of Japan.

peach,

Thanks! You are most kind.
 

MARK AUDIO4KICKS
Unregistered guest
OK JOHN STOP TRYING TO TOP MY STORIES,,,LOL
speakers soaked in sake, thats outrageous, outrageous i tell you, unless of course you have a dish of fantailed shrimp to go along with it,,,right now im having a few beers and using my cd player as a cheese cart, its cool i push the open button on my remote and out comes the party dip, john i would never think of drinking beer from my woofer, its only a 5 1/4 inch driver,,,way to small, looking at my sub-woofer with a wild look in my eye, where did i see that philips-head screw driver, well anyway im a man on a mission and i`ll be having a beer any minute now, ok now for my audio tip of the day,,,you know how much better your voice sounds in the shower, well so will your audio system, and please don`t worry if the gear gets alittle wet, damn thats what hair dryers are for,,,lol.
 

swampcat
Unregistered guest
Stanton Magnetics make good pro turn tables
 

Unregistered guest
HI Guys:

I found your site on Google. Don't know much about audio. WAnted to bring my records out of the basement. Bought a Technics 1200MK2 over the internet -new @ $388, only to find it did not have a catridge!

Found a site called "backspin- the unoffical Technics turntable page" He recommends Stanton 500EL and 680EL. Also says Ortofon's sound better, but are expensive.

Given that I want good quality, but am not an audiophile and would like to keep costs reasonable( say, below $200) what would you suggest for a catridge? Can I set it upo myself?

Lastly, I get the impression that lots of DJ's use the Technics turntable. IS that relevant for my decision making

WAlter



 

Silver Member
Username: Frank_abela

Berkshire UK

Post Number: 447
Registered: Sep-04
Walter

I don't know if DJs buying the deck influenced your decision making, but hey, you've got it now, so you may as well make the best of it. It's not a brilliant deck, but not a bad deck either.

For under $200 you can get yourself a good cartridge of reasonable quality. Backspin recommends Stantons because they can be backspun without killing the cartridge. If you do not intend to do any DJing and scratching, then I woudln't recommend the Stantons, aprtly because I don't much like their presentation and partly because they run heavy and kill records. In this don't let the DJs influence your decision.

The Ortofon 500 series is made of 4 cartridges. Each has the same body but a different stylus. You can upgrade styli. The cheapest is the 510 and the most expensive is the 540. Prices vary and I'm in the UK so I know your prices will differ. Buy the most expensive one you can afford - it's worth it.

As to fitting, well, it's a fiddly job and you need to get it right. Up to you to give it a go, but make sure you take care - you don't want to break the delicate stylus!

Regards,
Frank.
 

New member
Username: Casonetto

Post Number: 2
Registered: May-05
Well it looks like I am also in the market for a TT. I would like to go vintage for a nice warm thick sound, I don't mind paying what it costs. Is there more of a "sure thing" than ebay? Because I am tired of being outbid by 30-second snipers.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

LondonU.K.

Post Number: 3097
Registered: Dec-03
It depends where you are, Justin. HiFi magazines often carry ads from quality audio dealers who will quote a price, will have checked the unit, and sometimes offer a warranty. I bought some speakers from a UK audio trading company recently, and would do it again.

Having said that, there are some good and not-so-expensive new turntables around today, according to the reviews.
 

Unregistered guest
I'm planning to buy a "project debut" turntable and want your help on choosing the brands own "phono box" or "nad pp2" preamp. Thanks anyway...
 

New member
Username: Tony999

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada

Post Number: 1
Registered: Oct-05
I just found this forum. I am not a participant i n forums generally, and may not know all the ettiquette. I am posting this to see if the forum is stiull active, as the last post was July 29, 2005. The forum however sounds as if people on it are level headed and knowledgeable. I happened upopn it as I am seeking information oabout turntables. A freind's AR (XA)has probl;ems with the headshell (the threads are worn out), and mine has developed a bearing type of noise on the motor. I'd be interested in finding where I can get parts now, or on how to make repaires if possible.
Tony
 

Silver Member
Username: Stu_pitt

NYC, NY

Post Number: 638
Registered: May-05
Tony,

I'm not familiar with what you are asking, but I'm sure some people here would be able to help you out. Go to the main phono page and start a new thread.

If you can't find it, -

https://www.ecoustics.com/electronics/forum/home-audio/1.html

Click on Phono, then click on start a new thread.
 

Gold Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 6037
Registered: May-04


http://www.turntablebasics.com/

http://www.lpgear.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=LG&Category_ Code=R




Put "turntable repair" into a search engine.


 

New member
Username: Tony999

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada

Post Number: 2
Registered: Oct-05
Thanks for the advice.
 

New member
Username: Plato

Woodbury, NJ

Post Number: 3
Registered: Oct-05
How about a VPI turntable? I was at a dealer in Delaware the other day and happened to listen to their scout model (I guess it's the bottom of the line). It was absolutely amazing. It rtails at $1500 (includes arm but no cartridge) and it's worth every penny of it. What do you guys think about VPI turntables?
www.vpiindustries.com
 

New member
Username: Plato

Woodbury, NJ

Post Number: 4
Registered: Oct-05
How about a VPI turntable? I was at a dealer in Delaware the other day and happened to listen to their scout model (I guess it's the bottom of the line). It was absolutely amazing. It retails at $1500 (includes arm but no cartridge) and it's worth every penny of it. What do you guys think about VPI turntables?
www.vpiindustries.com
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 649
Registered: Feb-04
Max,

I agree that the VPI Scout is pretty special. There was a short-lived Scout thread on this forum.

https://www.ecoustics.com/electronics/forum/home-audio/128568.html
 

Silver Member
Username: Frank_abela

Berkshire UK

Post Number: 963
Registered: Sep-04
VPIs are meant to be excellent turntables. In the UK they retail for twice the retail price in the USA and they still do reasonably well.

Regards,
Frank.
 

New member
Username: Plato

Woodbury, NJ

Post Number: 6
Registered: Oct-05
Very insightful thread! I decided to start looking for a scout. Do you know of any sites where thay have decent prices for new ones?
Thanks,
Max
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 652
Registered: Feb-04
Try Galen Carol Audio http://www.gcaudio.com/index.html

You need to call them to get the actual price. The website only has the list price. I recall they had very good prices on VPI tts and helpful staff.

Elusive Disc usually has good prices on Scout/Dynavector packages.

Also try looking on Audiogon. Some VPI dealers advertise new Scouts on the 'gon.
 

New member
Username: Kfisto

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-05
I'm trying to get into analog audio after having bought a few records over the years and based on posts earlier in this thread, I looked at the Pro-Ject 1 Xpression table. I've also read a review on the Goldring GR1.2. Based on that review (and a slightly lower price tag, honestly), I'm leaning toward the Goldring. However, I'd like to hear pros and cons for each table from some knowledgeable person. Specifically, the GR1.2 has an MDF platter. How does an MDF platter compare with the 1X's cast aluminum platter? Is there a(n audible) difference in sound?

Thanks!
 

New member
Username: Macisgr8

Jacksonville, FL USA

Post Number: 4
Registered: Dec-05
That's a great question.
Aluminum, MDF (high quality particle board), steel, acrylic.

Is there any of these to stay away from?
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