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Frequency range out of each channel from Receiver

 

Bronze Member
Username: 1st61

Post Number: 93
Registered: Oct-04
for each channel on a 5.1, 6.1, 7.1 receiver, what's the frequency range is out from them?
especially for the subwoofer, what's the frequency range does it reveive?
We know each receiver is different. I want to know the theory behind the design of receivers.
A speaker may lose something but it can't output anything that it did not receive if we discard any artificial ones.

Typical CDs contain only 20-20k Hz data.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 391
Registered: Oct-04
http://www.polkaudio.com/home/faqad/advice.php?article=bassmanage
 

Bronze Member
Username: 1st61

Post Number: 94
Registered: Oct-04
I had read that before but it was mainly for the Subwoofer.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 393
Registered: Oct-04
Receivers generally output between 10 or 20 Hz to 20,000+ Hz. Speakers generally don't go all the way down to 20Hz, so if any frequencies are lost it is because the speaker cannot play them, not that the receiver is incapable of sending them.

Crossovers are used not only to maximize the bass output by diverting frequencies below the crossover to the speaker, but to also save amplifier power by not having the amp send frequencies that cannot be played.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 394
Registered: Oct-04
Should read:

Crossovers are used not only to maximize the bass output by diverting frequencies below the crossover to the subwoofer, but to also save amplifier power by not having the amp send frequencies that cannot be played.

 

Bronze Member
Username: 1st61

Post Number: 97
Registered: Oct-04
So how accurate a speaker is working towards its specs? This is an issue with speakers. Say a speaker with specs of 50-20k hz, can it really output all the 50-20k hz? probably not. Like TV that is designed to scan 525 line but may only scan 400 lines.
Maybe this make the difference between good and poor speakers which have same frequency range.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 395
Registered: Oct-04
I have Polk speakers, and they all exactly met their spec'd low pass when testing.

The "Avia Guide to Home Theatre" DVD has a descending tone test which can accurately pin-point a speaker's bottem end. When used with an SPL meter you can test your speakers' response at different volume levels. For example if I'm listening at very high levels I will set my fronts to large as they need the receivers full power to get good bass response. If I'm listening at moderate or low levels I will have them set to small with an 80Hz crossover, since the subwoofer can hit the notes without as much juice.
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