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Anybody having Sony seakers?max input power=?

 

Bronze Member
Username: Lukazi2001

Podgorica, Montenegro

Post Number: 12
Registered: Jan-05
Does anybody know to explain me what the Sony mean by maximum inpu power?
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 304
Registered: Oct-04
That is the maximum wattage that should be sent to the speakers from an amplifier. Sony floorstanders are generally ok to 200W, while bookshelfs are 125-150W. Unless you have a very powerful amp (read not a Sony) don't worry about overpowering the speakers, the only concern is overpowering the amp, which you will hear as clipping.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Lukazi2001

Podgorica, Montenegro

Post Number: 13
Registered: Jan-05
Thanks Kano.
Is 150 maximum input power the same as RMS?
May I send 150 W to my speakers continuosly, for long periods of time?
I use them with sony STR-DE597.What do you mean by ''read not sony''?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Usa2k4

Post Number: 77
Registered: Dec-04
When shopping for speakers, you'll see most of them have 2 different wattage ratings, the average or RMS power and the maximum or peak power. Now, the average power is the power that a speaker can handle continuously without damage. The maximum or peak power is the maximum power that a speaker can handle in a short period of time (under 1 sec) without damage. Wattage in music is not as simple as that of a light bulb because we're talking about the whole spectrum from 20Hz to 20,000Hz here and some frequencies would have more demands than the others depending on the type of music you're listening. If you're listening to a rock CD, for example, at moderate level that draws no more than 20W-RMS/channel from your amp or receiver, the bass may require up to 100W for some short periods of time even though the volume control knob on your receiver doesn't go pass its halfway. That is the instantanous or peak power that your receiver would put out in a fraction of a second. Even if your receiver can put out 130W/channel in 7.1 surround mode, I don't think you will ever run it at 100W/channel or more continuously before either your ears go deaf or your neighbors have some talk with you :-). The high power is only reserved power for the times the music calls for it to reproduce the low bass without causing clipping and distortion. Just enjoy your system without bothering much on whether or not you can put 100W continuosly to the speakers as I notice you've asked this several times.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kano

Post Number: 305
Registered: Oct-04
"What do you mean by ''read not sony''?"

Well that was too generic, the stupidly expensive Sonys could overpower the speakers but not that one.
A $200 receiver will not put out anything close to 100W. In audio 100W is the magic number that all companies market their receivers around. Here is the power specs for your receiver :

Channel Power Rating: 100 Watts Per Channel x 6 (8 ohms 1 kHz, THD 0.7%)

The power is measured channel by channel using a 1000 Hz test tone. An accurate power rating using a test tone covering all frequencies from 20Hz to 20,000Hz. Your receiver will never come close to giving out 125W RMS to the speakers, so as long as the receiver isn't clipping you have no worries about overpowering the speakers.
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