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HK7200-How Can Turntable Be Connected

 

Anonymous
 
Just bought a HK7200. I knew that HK does not have phono input. How can I connect a turntable to the 7200?

I have a turntable that has a pre-amp that can be turned on or off. Would it be better to get a
separate pre-amp and connect to a digital input?
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 70
Registered: 12-2003
I am a bit cofused by your post, so if I say something stupid here, it is because I don't understand what you have.

Your turntable need a phono pre-amp to adjust the frequency response and to boost the signal to a usable level for your receiver. If you already have a phono pre-amp, then simply plug the Left and Right leads from the Phono pre-amp into an AUX audio input on your receiver (which I believe is labelled "Multi" on the back of your receiver, just to the right of the Tape jacks in the bank of analog audio inputs).

If you don't have a phono pre-amp, you need to get one, such as the NAD PP2 or the Sumiko Pro-Ject Box, each of which is available for about $100. Just plug the turntable into the appropriate inputs on the Phono pre-amp and connect the output cables to the receiver (remember to connect the grounding wire from the turntable to the screw post on the phono pre-amp).

I do not believe you should ever connect a turntable to a digital input.
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 74
Registered: 12-2003
Anon:

I just checked the back of the 7200 and realized I made one mistake. "Multi" is an output, not an input, so you will apparently have to use the audio connections for Vid 3, on the left end of the bank of analog audio connections.

Sorry for the mistake--I should have checked it first before posting.

Cheers!
 

Anonymous
 
Hawk

Thanks for the suggestion. I thought Vid 3 was for video. I have again reviewed the Quick Start Guide that is published on the HK site. I will take your suggestion and use any input that is not labeled digital or optical. I was being cautious because of the varying mV that is generated by attached equipment.

Incidentally, there are pre-amps and turntables that produce digital output.
Thanks again.
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 78
Registered: 12-2003
Anon:

You have stumbled upon the one real weakness of what is otherwise a very good receiver--lack on inputs (somewhere, I hear EliteFan saying "I told you so!"). Still, the Vid 3 input is really an auxillary input, so I don't see any real problem using it for this purpose.

If you are like me, you have a treasure trove of great vinyl that was never transferred to CD, or is out of print. It was wonderful rediscovering my old records.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 121
Registered: 12-2003
Anonymous,

"I have a turntable that has a pre-amp that can be turned on or off."

Connect the pre-amp output to an input channel on the receiver. Turn it on. It doesn't matter what the receiver input is called.
 

Anonymous
 
Hawk & John A
Thanks for all the suggestions.

"...If you are like me, you have a treasure trove of great vinyl that was never transferred to CD, or is out of print. It was wonderful rediscovering my old records".

I have close to a thousand LP's and 45's. A major objective of this exercise is to convert the records to CDs. I am also researching some mixers and pre-amps that claim to be able able to eliminate the pops and scratches from vinyl.

I also plan to convert some of my VHS tapes to DVD
by passing the signal through the 7200 or a Canon Optura 20 camcorder. I am certain the camcorder will work. I have to read some more about the functionality of the 7200.

I have used these discussions to re-educate myself about the AV hobby/business since I left it and went into computers 18 years ago.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 124
Registered: 12-2003
Anonymous,

Like you I have recently come back to an interest in audio. Personally, I would not wish to digitise my LPs and VHS tapes. The best CD and DVD you can make will only be as good as the thing you make the copy from. The digital movie remasterings done by the professionals are sometimes awesome (Try West Side Story in 5.1), but for CDs the remasterings of prime LPs are often quite bad. What they can do today is clean up "archive" material, 78s etc.

I have some Direct Metal Mastering LPs from the 1980s. There is nothing like the sound. Some of them have been remastered onto CD for re-issue, and it was done very badly. Probably like you, I think I could do it better myself. A 44 kHz 16 bit stereo A-D converter is not expensive. But the CD would just be for convenience, not sound quality.
 

New member
Username: Ncavman

Post Number: 23
Registered: 12-2003
Hey Hawk,
Question for you... When you say lack of inputs what exactly are you referring to? I can't figure out how you could ever use all of the inputs on this one. I have heard this comment before and would like to understand where it is coming from.

The 7200 has:

3 digi optical
3 digi coax
8-channel direct
5 s-vid
2 component vid
5 composite vid
6 L/R audio

Plus RS-232 control, A-Bus control, 7-ch speaker outs or 5/ch and 2nd zone, 2 optical and 2 coax outs.

I am runnning:

-DVD with coax and 6-ch analog (component direct to TV)
-CD with optical
-HD cable box with component and coax
-Xbox with with component and optical or coax
-HT PC with optical for MP3 and surround encoded music and games and s-vid.
-VCR with s-vid and analog l/r audio
-CD recorder with optical out of 7200

-and there is still a bunch of open inputs.

Other than a phono input, which has faded out over the years, what is it that is missing? I really do want to know.
Thanks
 

Anonymous
 
John A.

My desire to convert the vinyl records and VHS tapes is to make them more convenient and easier to preserve.

Thanks for the lead on the 44kHz 16 bit stereo A-D converter
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 125
Registered: 12-2003
Anon,

That's the way to go. You can get an A-D converter with USB. Then it is just a question of making .aiff files and burning them onto CD. Remastering is another question. Many of the pros use a program called Sonic Solutions. I keep meaning to try this. It is time. and money!
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 85
Registered: 12-2003
NC:

Everything is relative and the HK 7200 has far fewer analog inputs than most receivers, expecially in that price range. Anon wants to add a turntable, yet the HK receiver does not even have an auxillary input for him to use. That is why I said it lacks inputs.

Compared to my Denon 3803 which has ten (10) analog audio inputs, the HK is rather lacking. My Denon has inputs for phono, CD, tape, DVD, VDP, TV, DBS, V/Aux, VCR1, and VCR2, plus seven (7) digital inputs, 2 coax and 5 optical. I am not saying my Denon is better than the HK because it has more inputs, merely that is does have more, and most receivers in the $1K price range have more than the HK.

I am one of those audio types that thinks it should be a crime when a receiver does not offer a phono input. I once thought everything was going to go digital, but now my 16 year old daughter is asking for a turntable of her own as a lot of club bands on the West Coast are offering their work on vinyl instead of CD and she has been buying them. Who would've thought . . . Furthermore, my reference to Elitefan was that I remembered he needed even more inputs than my Denon has, so he opted for a Pioneer Elite. Receivers are not one size fits all. Lack of inputs is not so much a criticism or judgement on the product as it is an observation. After all, it is a pretty objective thing whether a receiver has enough inputs for a consumer's needs. It either does or it doesn't.

If you don't need this many analog inputs, that is great, but some of us need more than the HK offers. Clearly, your system is more oriented toward digital sources, and that is fine, too. Nevertheless, I stand by my statement that the 7200 is lacking in analog inputs and it is truly unfortunate as the 7200 is one of the few really fine sounding receivers out there. But for the lack on analog inputs, I probably would have bought one instead of what I have.

 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 126
Registered: 12-2003
I read in January (I think) HiFi news about a good, new budget turntable with a phono pre-amp built in, so you can connect it to any input. I can look it up if anyone is interested. But I agree with Hawk. Amps and receivers should have phono inputs. I am lucky and have a nice NAD 100 stereo pre-amp. It even has switch for MM/MC. That coupled with the range of pre-amp in/out connections on my receiver gives me all the connectivity I need. I feel special affection for the pre-amp button labelled "phono". It means serious listening!
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 127
Registered: 12-2003
BTW I have done some tests with my son's iPod and think you need an MM phono input for that, too. The signal from the phones socket is very small, probably to conserve battery power. I guess iPod has very efficient earphones.

If I am right, then this is another reason for having a low-voltage amp/receiver input. If I designed a receiver I would give it at least two: phono and MP3 player/iPod. They may differ, ideally, in impedance, but I think the voltages would be about the same. And thirdly an MC input (even lower voltage), unless you can switch between MM and MC.

In praise of iPod, but not MP3
 

Anonymous
 
John A

I will search HIFi magazine to find the turntable that you mentioned. But I need help to identify the A-D converter with USB.
Thanks
 

New member
Username: Ncavman

Post Number: 24
Registered: 12-2003
Hawk -
Thanks for the explanation. The 7200 is not lacking though. Your statement is based on a phono input that very few people still use. That makes turntable users the minority and not the rule. Nothing wrong at all with turntable users... just a very small % of them are buying good HT multi-channel AVRs. I would venture to guess that LP users are buy more 2-channel equipment than AVR's as I am not aware of any 7.1 vinyl. That said, Mr. Anon can plug his turntable/pre into any of the analog inputs on the 7200, leaving 6 more available, forget that it says AUX or CD or DVD. I bet it will sound terrific. They can pick any one. You are right that one size doesn't fit all in this market.

I do not have an extensive LP collection because CD's came into the picture when I was very young and sounded so much better to us, that is what we collected. With 7 analog inputs plus eight-channel direct, and 6 digital inputs on the 7200, I am good to go for a long time with my requirements.

You also pointed out how good this AVR sounds, I would agree 100%. It does not fit in my newer BellO rack nor does it match my room and electronics... guess what, I will find another rack instead of another AVR and get over the matched look. It is great to rediscover older stereo material and get the feeling of hearing it for the very first time, or enjoy material that is SACD or DVD-A.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 129
Registered: 12-2003
Anonymous,

I have found it. Page 19 of Jan 2004 HiFi News. The turntable gets an "editors choice" award for 2003.

It is called a Pro-Ject Debut II Phono SB turntable.

Costs GBP 170 which is about USD 250, I think. It also has a "free" Ortofon MM cartridge. Seems like exceptional value. I cannot find the manufacter in Google but there are lots of dealers and reviews.

A/D converters - here is one. It is firewire, not USB, since it does video, too.

http://dv411.com/advc100.html
 

New member
Username: Basfrommobay

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2003
John A

Thanks a lot for all the information. I cannot find a US retailer of the Pro-Ject turntable. I ordered
an Audio Technica PL120. It also has a built-in pre-amp.

I found the Canopus ADVC100 converter for prices ranging from US$248-299. I will wait until they are less expensive (that is almost guaranteed in electronics)
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 133
Registered: 12-2003
You are welcome, Ian. Good luck.
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 106
Registered: 12-2003
NC:

I certainly don't disagree that phono users are few and far between. My greater criticism is that there are so few analog inputs period.

I think I am like most people as I went looking for a receiver that would do it all. I sometimes want to listen to 2 channels sources and sometimes to surround sound sources. As I am old enough to have a superb vinyl collection (many in wonderful shape as I stopped using my turntable while I had young children and they have been carefully stored until I recently got them out again. But phono isn't the only orphan. I have friends with all kinds of strange formats which have been foisted upon us by the major manufacturers (i.e., Sony) from time to time such as MiniDisk and DAT, which some people do have and want to play in the future. Many of us have never been fully satisfied with the CD format (all of the music is there, but it does sound sterile compared to a good vinyl recording, hence the push to develop SACD and DVD-A). In my case I have more than one tape machine (it could be worse, I almost bought a reel to reel when I was in college), a turntable, a DVD, two CD players (one is SACD) plus the TV--and I have a number of recordings for all of them. I am out of room with a 7200!

BTW, not to quibble, but I only count 6 analog inputs: Vid1, Vid2, Vid3, DVD, CD, and Tape. Have I missed one?

I am glad you are loyal to this AVR because it is certainly among the very best sounding receivers out there and good sound is the most important chareteristic a receiver must have. I, too, would change my rack to keep the receiver because I do no like the poor quality of sound that comes out of most receivers. More people should get the 7200, but alas, I will not be one of them for the reasons stated.

Cheers!
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 107
Registered: 12-2003
JohnA:

The ProJect Turntable is imported into the USA from the Czech Republic by Sumiko and can often be found under that brand name, I believe. It is sold by Jerry Raskin at the following site:

http://shopping.netsuite.com/s.nl/c.ACCT106601/sc.2/category.352/.f;jsessionid=9efd08484cf54ad386e3e108a335ca55

I hope this helps! Warmest wishes.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 139
Registered: 12-2003
Hawk,

I agree with your point to NC. It was Anon/Ian Hall who was interested in the turntable; I was trying to help. If the Pro-Ject is made in Czech Rep then that is a good explanation of quality for the price, in my opinion. A turntable is half mechanical engineering and half art. Interesting to know how long they have been making them.

Personally I have a 25 yr old Rega. It is the one item I have never felt any inclination to upgrade. NAD's current model is much the same. I will try the graphics function, again. Not sure it should be encouraged!

Rega Planar 3
 

New member
Username: Ncavman

Post Number: 30
Registered: 12-2003
Hi Hawk - Thanks for the reply. You have reminded me of some other equipment I haven't used in a while. I have an early 90's Panasonic DAT and a 25+ year old reel that I think I will hook back up.

Oh, for the analog inputs, I counted 7: tape, CD, DVD, Vid 1, Vid 2, Vid 3 and don't forget Vid 4. Some 7200's had a tiny door covering it on the bottom edge of the front panel which could have made it easy to overlook. I have some small brass 90 degree RCA connectors that come up from the bottom of the unit so I can use this input easily should I ever need to. Looks nice. Then there's also the 8-channel direct analog inputs.
 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 110
Registered: 12-2003
NC:

You are right, I forgot the front panel inputs! Thanks.

 

New member
Username: Hawk

Post Number: 111
Registered: 12-2003
JohnA:

I have a 15 year old Thorens with a Linn Basik arm. Very good and functional, but not art. But in looking at some of these Pro-Ject turntables, I am intrigued. Some of them are defintely good art as well as good engineering. I am still regretting not buying an Oracle Alexandria turntable, which was one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen (not just audio equipment, either). A buddy of mine bought one in a pawn shop two years ago for $50! They were $1000 new 20 years ago.
 

New member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 141
Registered: 12-2003
Hawk,

You have a great turntable/arm combo. Look after it! Even after all this time the mistakes I made with turntables make me grind my teeth. Which is partly why I am so attached to the Rega (bought in Oxford btw). Excuse the photo of an old friend! I've looked at the current NAD turntable, and it is clearly the Rega Planar 2/3 underneath, more or less unchanged, same glass platter, everything.

The Pro-Ject looks good, gets great reviews, and is cheap. It has an aluminium platter. HiFi News had a whole section on turntables recently. New LP vinyl pressings are increasing, too, there is clearly market demand.

Yes, I am sure amazing bargains can be had. Some people are crazy enough to think turntables are obsolete.

All the best.
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