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No Phono inputs in most new receivers... how to...

 

New member
Username: Dommerdog

Post Number: 3
Registered: Sep-04
I'm interested in a new receiver for Home Theater. My current setup is a B&K ST140 Power Amp/Pre-amp.

The receiver that interests me is the Marantz SR5400, but it's got no Phono. I don't use the phono much, but I do have some 350 LP's I want to keep, plus I love the warm sound of LP's.

How can I get a phono input into a non-phono receiver?

I was thinking of perhaps using my current pre-amp's phono input and using the "tape out" to my receiver, would this work?

Any other suggestions?
 

New member
Username: Dommerdog

Post Number: 4
Registered: Sep-04
Oh! oh! I think I got it, connect my pre-amp's output to the aux (or other) connection in the receiver... right?

What will happen with the pre-amp's volume control?
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2114
Registered: Dec-03
Dom Dog,

You've got it. Try it and see. I use a system like that for playing LPs. You have two volume controls, but that's not so difficult to deal with. In fact you can turn the pre-amp volume control to the setting where the input to the receiver is at about the same level as that of other sources (CD etc.), which is something a lot is people seem to want and expect from LPs.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest


The proper way to do the connection is to run from the tape out on the pre amp to the tape in or aux on the reciever. This puts the output in front of the volume control and gives just one point where voltage output can be changed.


 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest

By using the pre outs you are also affecting the loading of the input as you change the volume control position. The volume control repesents a variable resistor and has different reistance, and therefore output impedance, as you raise and lower the volume. By using the tape out you have a fixed value for output impedance that is matched to the input impedance of your reciever. The tape out is just more technically correct.



 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2118
Registered: Dec-03
J. Vigne strikes again.

I should have been able to work that out for myself. "Why didn't I think of that?"

I'll try it, later today. Thanks, Jan!

Or, of course, you could use the power amp stage only of the receiver, and the volume control on the pre-amp....?
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2121
Registered: Dec-03
I have tried connecting the pre-amp from the tape 1 out, and it does not give sufficient volume. But thanks, again, J. It was worth trying, and I can see it is the preferred connection, other things being equal.

Dom Dog, I think J. Vigne's recommendation should be the first thing to try. If that does not give a large enough signal, you can try the pre-amp out to power amp, to aux or any spare receiver input, but take care. Low volume settings at first etc.

BTW I wonder what is the problem with the B&K ST140. It should do the job rather better than a Marantz SR5400, I should have thought. Maybe it is just a question of available speakers? You can always re-connect your main speakers to the B&K for "serious listening"...
 

New member
Username: Dommerdog

Post Number: 5
Registered: Sep-04
Yes, I am keeping my BK for my fronts and will use the Marantz as pre-amp for stereo mode, unelss I like the marantz enough and sell the BK
 

New member
Username: Dommerdog

Post Number: 6
Registered: Sep-04
... The reason the the Marantz is home theater
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2135
Registered: Dec-03
Dom, I am not with you. You don't get home theater from LP....
 

Bronze Member
Username: Frank_abela

Berkshire UK

Post Number: 73
Registered: Sep-04
Dom Dog, you can do the above with the preamp, or you could get a dedicated phono stage. The most basic phono stage I've heard which I think offers good value is from Pro-ject and costs around £45 ($70) here in the UK.

Almost all phono stages have lower gain than ordinary line level sources (such as CD players and tuners). This is because the phono stage has to amplify much lower signals. Increasing the gain usually includes increasing the noise. The only phono stage I know of which has a high enough gain to make it almost as loud as a line level source is the Tom Evans Groove, but that's a £2000 ($3000) phono stage (and it's lovely...).

Typically, phono stage outputs are 1/2 to 2/3rds of the line level sources.

Regards,
Frank.
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