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How to connect 4 speakers with 4 ohm each to 1 receiver

 

New member
Username: Dandy099

Post Number: 1
Registered: May-16
Hi everyone. I need to connect four 4 ohm speakers (they are Altec Lansing Ada885, 60 Watts or 15 watts per driver) to a JVC 884RBK receiver. I would like to listen music from it in stereo mode (2 speakers on each side). It does seem to support 4 ohm speakers for stereo and surround. But I'm not exactly sure which way to connect them best? I don't have a subwoofer. Only 4 speakers. Is it too dangerous to connect in parallel?

Another problem is the specs on the amplifier seem to output a lot more power compared to the speakers that I have. Is it even safe to connect them ? I don't plan to listen anything loud.

At Stereo operation
Front channels ............................................................. 100 watts per channel, min. RMS,
driven into 4 ohms at 1 kHz, with
no more than 0.7 % total harmonic
distortion. (IEC268-3/DIN)
50 watts per channel, min. RMS,
driven into 8 ohms at 1 kHz, with
no more than 0.7 % total harmonic
distortion. (IEC268-3/DIN)
At Surround operation
Front channels ............................................................. 70 watts per channel, min. RMS,
driven into 4 ohms at 1 kHz, with
no more than 0.8 % total harmonic
distortion.
Center channel ............................................................. 70 watts, min. RMS, driven into
4 ohms at 1 kHz, with no more than
0.8 % total harmonic distortion.
Rear channels .............................................................. 70 watts per channel, min. RMS,
driven into 4 ohms at 1 kHz, with
no more than 0.8 % total harmonic
distortion.

I am quite an amateur at this stuff therefore a helpful advice is highly appreciated. Thanks.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3353
Registered: Oct-07
Since the speakers are IDENTICAL, you could wire 'em in SERIES.

Are you going to 'stack' them? We did that many years ago for big parties.

Wire from the PLUS of the receiver to the PLUS of the first speaker. From the MINUS of this speaker to the PLUS of the second. From the MINUS of the second speaker back to the MINUS of the receiver.

This'll give you a nominal 8 ohms per side and easily in the 'comfort zone' of the receiver. A PARELLEL connection will result in what will appear to the amp as 1/2 the impedance of either OR, in this case, 2 ohms.

Now, since this is a HT receiver? It is POSSIBLE that somewhere buried in all the setups and options is a provision for BIAMP. This is where you have 2 amplfiers going to ONE speaker. The speaker has 4 binding posts and JUMPERS. For normal operation, you connect ONE set of speaker leads to ONE set of the posts and the JUMPERS (copper of other metal bars) carry the signal to the OTHER set. What the biamp folks do is REMOVE THE JUMPERS and connect ONE amp to EACH pair of binding posts.
In YOUR CASE, just connect to each pair of speakers. Each speaker will have its OWN amp which I think will satisfy the need to NOT DROP BELOW 4 ohms.

Failing that, try the series connection I detailed above.

Questions?
 

New member
Username: Dandy099

Post Number: 2
Registered: May-16
Thank you so much for the info. Yes, it is probably called 'stacking'. The speakers were part of a 4.1 set, so they could be either used separately or as 2.1 in a stacked way. I will do what you suggested. The receiver is not yet in my possession, it is coming this week in the mail. So, I will report how it worked out later in the week. Series connection sound a bit easier than the BIAMP. I am not certain if it has such option, the manual online says it's an Audio/Video control receiver. In either case, I will check if it's got the function you've described.
 

New member
Username: Dandy099

Post Number: 3
Registered: May-16
Hi again. I forgot to ask , what to do with tweeters when setting up in series? They are connected to the first full range speakers. There's also a small capacitor on each of them.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3354
Registered: Oct-07
A capacitor is used to restrict low frequencies from getting to the speaker. A single capacitor in series is a first order filter. Do NOT remove it.

Now that I look this at some pics of this setup? I have misgivings about the whole thing.
If ME? I'd send off for a pair of the DAYTON B652 speakers which are ON SALE and certainly less than 50$ the pair. And will easily exceed the performance of those 'altecs' The name had me fooled. Back in the day, Altec was a good name.
 

New member
Username: Dandy099

Post Number: 4
Registered: May-16
The set up is a little messy right now. I'm having to open the speakers up just to figure out the whole thing. And I can try to explain a bit more. So, there is 1 full range driver + tweeter in each speaker. They were designed together this way. Then there are extra exactly the same full range-driver speakers (without tweeters) that are 'separate' and can be stacked on top of the first ones. So, the only confusing thing right now is which order to connect them in? Starting with the speaker that comes together with tweeter or starting with the separated one?
 

New member
Username: Dandy099

Post Number: 5
Registered: May-16
http://pasteboard.co/QEWftx9.jpg
http://pasteboard.co/QG48AH3.jpg
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3356
Registered: Oct-07
My opinion holds. You'd do better with a pair of the DAYTON B652 speakers for under 50$. Add a few $$ for delivery
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