Like

Sunfire True Subwoofer Signature 10" repair

 

New member
Username: Pirates712

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-12
Hi all,
Just found this site. I got a pair of the aforementions subs for free several years ago and made an attempt at fixing one of them. I fixed the problem it had of blowing fuses but it still doesn't produce any sound. The other one I have caused the GFI in the garage to trip. I had given up on the idea of repairing them and was about to sell them for parts on ebay until I found this site; it seems like you guys know what you're talking about!

I'm not sure how repairable my subs are, but if you think it's possible let me know and I'll get some pictures up with more detailed information. I'm going into my third year of a computer engineering program next fall and love working on electronics. If I could get either of these working it would be fantastic!

Thanks in advance

p.s. - I'm a member of several different board for various things, and I know they all have their unwritten rules and ettiquette. If I break any of the unwritten rules here please let me know .
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2781
Registered: Oct-07
I'd start by getting a schetch-o-matic.

As for a GFI fault? I'd start at the PS end.....
Sounds like you're familiar enough with a DVM to fix these......
 

New member
Username: Pirates712

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jun-12
schetch-o-matic... you mean schematic? Play on words I'm sure. My basic google searches have come up dry, not sure where else to look. I've read though that Sunfire never actually released schematics for these. Do you know where I might find them?
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2782
Registered: Oct-07
I wish I could help with THAT.

I've heard of sharing types who were very familiar with Sunfire stuff. If I were motivated......I'd write Bob Carver direction...or the company if he's sold his interest.

Maybe THIS link?

http://thecarversite.com/manuals.htm
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14693
Registered: Dec-03
Bob Carver doesn't sell schematics for his Sunfire products. You're SOL on that account. He will replace the plate amp for you for $270 flat rate plus shipping. Just send the amp, not the whole sub.

If you want to fix the amp yourself, start with an ESR meter and test every capacitor on the board. You'll probably find most of them failed. I did with my Mk II true sub. After re-capping the plate amp, everything was back in shape.
 

New member
Username: Pirates712

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jun-12
Ok cool... can the caps be tested in-place or do they have to be desoldered? Also, any recomendations on a decent ESR meter?

Thanks!
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14695
Registered: Dec-03
you can test them on the board with a decent ESR meter. Make sure you get an actual ESR meter and not a "capacitor tester" which is a cheap device that doesn't actually test the ESR of a cap.

As for a suggestion on model, just look on amazon and find one with a price you can live with. They start at around $200+
 

New member
Username: Pirates712

Post Number: 4
Registered: Jun-12
http://www.amazon.com/Anatek-Corporation-blueesrassy-Blue-Fully-assembled/dp/B005NI4WE4

This probably isn't the highest quality available but what do you think of this one?
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14702
Registered: Dec-03
For what it's worth, you can do a quick test of electrolytics, just to see if they are "good," by using a VOM with an analog scale/meter gauge.

set the VOM to Ohms (resistance) to 1M (high range)
touch a shurt of jumper wire to the capacitor's pins to short and discharge it.
Next, touch the probes to the cap pins, and watch the meter.
The needle should swing from "open" to "zero," then swing immediately back to "open." If this happens, showing the voltage of the cap as it charges, the cap is good.
If the needle swings from open to zero, and stays at zero, this indicates a "shorted" capacitor, meaning it's bad.

That's a cheap and dirty way to check caps, but it won't be as good as using an actual ESR meter, which can tell you if the cap is leaky or problematic.

I use the VOM method to test crossovers in speakers, and it's worked well with a lot of the old KEF speakers I've restored that are 20+ years old.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2784
Registered: Oct-07
We called that the 'kick' test.
At least back when a Simpson 260 voltohmist was 'standard' for a tech.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14705
Registered: Dec-03
Nothing wrong with a Simpson 260. I use a Micronta that's a replica of a 260 (the RS 22-208A), and the tech I send my gear to when I don't want to fix it myself still swears by his 260.

Great meters.
 

New member
Username: Pirates712

Post Number: 5
Registered: Jun-12
Thanks for the help guys, I really appreciate it.

If I decide this project is too much work and/or would cost too much, what do you think I could sell either the whole subs or just the woofers for?
« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Add Your Message Here

Bold text Italics Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image Add a YouTube Video
Need to Register?
Forgot Password?
Enable HTML code in message
   

Facebook

Shop Related Deals

Directory

Main Forums

Today's Posts

Forum Help

Follow Us