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6 ohm speaker on a 4 ohm rated amplifier

 

New member
Username: Subujoseph

Post Number: 1
Registered: Apr-12
Hi Everyone,

I have a Pioneer SX-X360 5.1 channel surround system. The amplifier says to only connect speakers with 4 Ohms impedance.
If I connect speakers with 6 Ohm impedance to the system, will it blow out the amplifier?

Thanks
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17238
Registered: May-04
.

No, you are always safer with a higher impedance load on the amp. Besides, speakers are seldom just one single impedance load, they tend to have additional components not shown in a single impedance spec which make for a more complex load on the amp. But it would be very unusual for a Pioneer to recommend 4 Ohm speakers. Typically a Pioneer is recommended just the opposite - do not connect 4 Ohm speakers. You might want to read the owner's manual again.


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Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14621
Registered: Dec-03
Some of their newer class D AV receivers are 4 ohm stable.
That said, 4 ohms is just the minimum nominal impedance for which the amplifier stage is rated to be stable.

6 ohm loads are fine, you'll just put out less power than you wound to a 4 ohm load.

in approximation, and if the amp has no output regulation to alter these results, power and load works like this:

1000 watt amplifier at 4 ohm load will put out 750 watts at 6 ohms, and 500 watts at 8 ohms, not accounting for efficiency, or the fact that typically most amplifiers will not produce quite double the power at half the load, again, depending on the topography of the amp.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17241
Registered: May-04
.

Four Ohm stable,OK, but why say only four Ohm speakers?

See now I wasn't going to mention the power thing. Now the op will think his system doesn't play loud enough or sound good enough 'cause his speakers are six Ohms. 'Sides, his speakers are only a nominal six Ohms and the amp only produces that sort of power into a load resistor on a test bench. The op is never going to know the difference.


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Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14623
Registered: Dec-03
for what it's worth, don't concern yourself (OP) with power ratings on an amp. truth be told, I have an amp in my bedroom )16x18 feet floor space) that's rated for around 230 watts per channel at 4 ohms. I'm driving the speakers (two 4 ohm KEF floor speakers, 92dB sensitivity, 115dB peak output) and using a small 10" sub for a 2.1 system, and when I turn the volume up to where the walls are shaking and you have to yell to be heard over the stereo, my amp's VU meters are showing me that I'm using less than 10 watts at peak transients, and an average of about 0.2 to 1.0 watts on average.

In other words, it doesn't really take a lot of power to get extremely loud.
 

New member
Username: Joujou

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-16
HI
MY AMP IS 2000 WATTS,AT 4 OHMS,THE SPEAKERS ARE 6 OHMS 100 WATS EACH
IT IS OKAY TO USE IT
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3394
Registered: Oct-07
First, it is Questionable if the amp REALLY has 2000 watts or not. The way an amp is RATED is part science and part marketing. You can call amp power anything from 'Music Power' to 'continuous' to 'Peak Power' to 'Instantanious Peak Power' to whatever the marketing guys can come up with.
That being said, with SS equipment, the power DROPS as impedance RISES. So your mythical 2000 watts @4ohms is less at 6ohms.
Speaker 'watts' is another mythical number. How is THAT rated or measured? 101 watts and the speaker explodes? 100 watts for 5 minutes and it melts down? WHOSE WATTS?
As long as you do NOT audibly drive the rig to distortion you SHOULD be OK. Long time periods of high levels CAN damage tweeters. Just LISTEN for distortion and don't overdo it.

I'll bet my 125 watt amp can destroy your speakers quicker than your 2000 watt amp.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 18297
Registered: May-04
.

Car audio makes a lot of ridiculous claims regarding wattage. 2000 watts @ 4 Ohms would be typical of car audio.

So, is this a car audio amplifier?
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3396
Registered: Oct-07
https://www.amazon.com/Crown-Digital-Power-Amplifier-Watts/dp/B000FL3QGY

Do a cut/paste if your curious. Amp is 2kw rated, @1% distortion / 1khz. At least they make some reasonable disclosures about power. That being said, this is a multi-voltage switcher PS which WON"T make spec at lower voltages. They ALL appear to be that way.

Car audio is FAMOUS for wacky claims. And to support such stereo, car ELECTRICAL systems are beefed up and include Big Alternators and multiple batteries.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 18302
Registered: May-04
.


"Do a cut/paste if your curious."


I guess you didn't catch on that I am not.



The op doesn't seem to want to return. Wonder, why?

Anyway, yes, you can use the 6 Ohm speakers with your amp. Don't expect 2000 watts. As the amplifier's specs tell you, wattage changes with the speaker load. The "wattage" of a speaker is not wattage. Speakers don't got no watts. The spec is BS and should be ignored.

You control the amp, right?

You are more likely to blow up your speakers than is the amp.

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