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Another problem, please help

 

New member
Username: Almc224

Post Number: 2
Registered: Feb-12
Recently I got my hands on a Crest Audio 900V . This is a monster AMP. It's used for live concerts. It does from 250 to 1,000 Watts per channel depending on the speakers ohms. So the AMP will pump out 250 Watts per channel, Thank God to my Bose. My Bose 901s are 8 Ohms, and can handle up to 450 Watts Per Channel.

The AMP is in excellent conditions, if not new, the Bose have been running on 100 Watts. In other words, I'm only tickling them. This is my problem: How do I install them. I use to be a guru at this but I've been away from the High Output Home Audio scene since my old days as a DJ.

How do I hookup my system? Haveing to install two equalizer. One from Bose and the other a Gemini EQ-3000. I have:

1. Crest Audio 900V AMP
2. Bose 901 VI with Active Equalizer
3. Gemini PreAmp PA-7000
4. Gemini EQ-3000
5. with 2 CD (one Sony the other JVC)
6. one DD Gemini Phono (yes, for the black plastic records with the little holes in them. I'm still old school in some stuff)

I know that this is the last equipment I'll buy in my life. So I want to get this right the first time. I'll cry like a baby if I burn something. Help me out guys.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17189
Registered: May-04
.

The Bose eq should be placed between the pre amp and the power amp since it is a necessary component for the 901's and will never be switched out of line.

The second eq should be placed in a tape monitor loop on the pre amp. This will allow you to switch the eq out of the circuit for comparisons.





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Gold Member
Username: Superjazzyjames

Post Number: 2001
Registered: Oct-10
 

New member
Username: Almc224

Post Number: 3
Registered: Feb-12
After some trial and error (without blowing anything up) I managed to install the Bose 901s and the 250RMS AMP. Sounds nice. But, unfortunately, I have an excellent ear for fidelity. Now, it is a question of re-mastering my 5,000+ cds to DVD, maybe up to Blu-rey quality sound. ;)
 

New member
Username: Almc224

Post Number: 4
Registered: Feb-12
BTW, thanks guys. Now where is that Bill Evans, Return to Forever, Jean Luc Ponty, Bach,.....
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17424
Registered: May-04
.

You can't "re-master" your CD's to a higher level of bit density. The source CD - your copy - is at Redook standard 16 bit resolution and 44.1 kHz sampling rate. That's all the data you have to work with. Anything you do to the copy - upsampling for example - will not change the amount of data you have to work with. That is the limitiation of virtually all music digitally recorded to CD over the last thirty years. Archivists warned of this when CD entered the picture in 1982, large amounts of data have been left in the studio and can never be retrieved from the 16/44.1 copy.

Upsampling works to place the available data farther above the dithered noise floor - which in turn moves the aliasing frequencies further away from the data stream and audibility by the listener - and to provide a higher sampling frequency which "looks at" the data a greater number of times before error correction occurs. There are some advantages to this system of upsampling but few people agree on the sampling frequency to which the signal should be upsampled. Remember, virtually all commercial CD's begin as 16 bit/48kHz data streams which are then downsampled to Redbook CD's 16bit/44.1kHz rate. Arguably, some data has already been lost or "confused" in the downsampling to a non-logrhithmic frequency. The same loss of information is possible when upsampling occurs to other non-logrithmic frequencies. Clocking errors made during the upsampling process can confuse data which would ultimately lead to less quality in the transfer process not more. Therefore, upsampling a Redbook CD rate to any other rate which is not a multiple of 44.1kHz is a dicey operation made more so by the generally poor quality of affordable consumer grade systems.

Since CD based DAC's can handle upsampled data, there is no great advantage to upsample to a DVD rate. At the present time I am unaware of any consumer level software which could transfer CD data to a BluRay data stream and the results would be of questionable value even if it were possible.

I would suggest you buy a high quality outboard DAC and go with that rather than mess with your chances of success using any other process.



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Gold Member
Username: Superjazzyjames

Post Number: 2016
Registered: Oct-10
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