Like

OT-> Biggest reason not to run ground to cap?

 

Gold Member
Username: Safe_cracker

Chicago, IL US

Post Number: 2349
Registered: Jan-06
I have seen this when installing caps you are told not to run the amp(s) ground straight to the cap. I don't get it because If you can run an amp straight to a battery or multiple batteries then why not a cap that has a built in dist block and carries much less capacity than the powering batteries? I have seen installs where the gound goes to the body but only one inch away is the attachment point for the amps ground, it is the same available metal! I can see if indeed you are using the body ground to filter the inputting voltage but the voltage coming from the cap is clean, that is the natural characteristics of a cap...Can someone who actually knows shed some light please.. Polo.
 

New member
Username: Nickb4247

Post Number: 10
Registered: Dec-06
Running the amps ground through the cap might lower the current capacity of said amps ground. Electricity, like water, takes the path of least obstruction. If you ground to your frame, that electrical energy will not run back up the caps' ground, but through the frame to the battery/alt. If you ground your amp to your cap, it must run through the cap. That is just more metal between your amp and its final ground(alt/bat). Grounding components very close to each other makes the charging system see the components as "one" large compenent(each component sees the same resistance in its grounding). Thus, less distortion(alt wine, engine noise, ect.). A common ground is important, and although running your ground through your cap gives a common ground, it doesn't seem to have any advantages. Especialy with high farad caps, it would seem you would be putting more strain on that single "shared" ground by running the amp through the cap, this could be solved by using larger gauge wire. Just my two cents on what seems logical.
 

Gold Member
Username: Safe_cracker

Chicago, IL US

Post Number: 2351
Registered: Jan-06
That can't be it because the cap I am using has a distro block built into it meaning that the amplifier connection points are connected directly to the distro inturn is connected to the dual 1/0 ga body ground. Unless the 2500 rms I am running is going to over power the 2 runs of 1/0ga going to my 3F Stinger super cap (I don't see it happening) there has to be another reason. Think about it, the gound comes from the body up the dual runs to the cap ground which is a distrobution block, meaning all one piece of metal, the same for the possitive, this in turn is the same as if you just run straight from the battery and the body ground. There is no way for the cap to lower anything but only to supplement because it is passive and not active meaning going through. Ok let me reword it again I can see the dumbfounded look on veryones face, lol. With this cap the amps see the battery voltage no matter what, the capacity of the wiring is not compromised by the cap at all. All the electrical energy does not pass through the cap but the cap supplements the voltage under spikes. Because the power does not pass entirely throught the cap it cannot be a limiting factor here... NEXT..... Polo...
 

Bronze Member
Username: Nickb4247

Post Number: 18
Registered: Dec-06
I can't argue with you that there don't seem to be any disadvantages, particularly with your setup(the distro block). But, inturn, what are the advantages. And I dont think 250 amps will fry two 0 gauge runs. The only draw back I could possibly think of without research would be the fact that you had to cut the wire to run it through the cap. B/C its 0 gauge you won't notice sh*t. But in other setups, it might effect the solidity of the ground. In a well devised system, NO. But in a system that is alreasy using wire that cannot handle the systems current draw, it might make things worse. But a cap would not be advisable in that situation until the wire is upgraded anyways. I agree with you, I see nothing wrong with it, in fact I planned on doing the same thing when/if I ever get a cap.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Nickb4247

Post Number: 19
Registered: Dec-06
Grounding your amp through your capacitor is an extra step you can take towards avoiding ground loops. Commons grounds are always good. But its important to concentrate on making the ground as short as possible. Running it through a cap adds lenth to the ground(not much tho). But it might make the difference in a db drag, where every tenth of a db counts.
 

Gold Member
Username: Safe_cracker

Chicago, IL US

Post Number: 2352
Registered: Jan-06
Ya, makes sence and I went ahead and did it, works great. The Stinger 3F supercap works great and looks great, thanks for the input.. Polo.. :-)
« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Facebook

Shop Related Deals

Directory

Main Forums

Today's Posts

Forum Help

Follow Us