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Starting with digital or film?

 

New member
Username: Jake_faber

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jan-07
Im really interested in photography and want to learn how to use a 35mm slr camera. My question is whether i should start with a fim camera or a dslr? I know a film camera would be cheaper, but in the long run there is the cost of film and developing the film. I was just interested in your opinions and which cameras would be appropriate for an amature. Thanks
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 12589
Registered: Dec-03
Definitely digital. You will still need to apply the same principles, but you don't have to worry about wasting film.

You can concentrate on the basics and composition without having to worry about wasting film and you can correct on the spot without having to wait until you get the results.

You are thinking about a digital slr aren't you?
 

New member
Username: Jake_faber

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jan-07
yeah i am. i like the d40 my friend has a rebel xt and he loves it but i want something different and i know they are both really nice cameras. Are there any major differences between the d40 and d50. the d40 is much cheaper, which i like.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 12590
Registered: Dec-03
You can't go wrong with the D40.
 

New member
Username: Jake_faber

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jan-07
Thanks i think im going to buy the d40, do you have any recomendations for lenses, i know lenses usually depend on what your shooting, but are there any you would recomend or think would be useful for a beginner.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 12591
Registered: Dec-03
I believe the D40 kit came with an 18-55 lens. That is also an excellent lens. Nice and sharp.
 

New member
Username: Jake_faber

Post Number: 4
Registered: Jan-07
thanks for the information i really appreciate it.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 12595
Registered: Dec-03
Welcome to the wonderful world of photography:-)
 

Bronze Member
Username: Santa_fe

Post Number: 61
Registered: Jul-07
hey how much do thoes camera's run??
 

Silver Member
Username: Jtown

ATX, Texas

Post Number: 713
Registered: Mar-07
hey Berny!
can you give me a suggestion as to what is comparable or higher quality for about the same price as the Sony DSCH 3 Cybershot 8.1?
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 14089
Registered: Dec-03
Canon Powershot SX-100
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 1449
Registered: Oct-07
I gotta Really disagree with berny.
FILM is the way to start. Get a simply 35mm with a 'normal' lens.
Learn composition and not to rush. Learn to monitor film usage.
When I do a wedding, a bride wants good pictures, not just 300 bad pictures.
Learn darkroom. Learn how to develop and print from 35mm b/w negative film.

By the time you've shot a bunch of film, and yes simply wasted a bunch of it, you'll get the hang of it and to choose good shots and not just keep mindlessly clicking away.

That is if you really want to LEARN photography. Upload
 

Platinum Member
Username: Plymouth

Canada

Post Number: 15032
Registered: Jan-08
Digital 100/%, the film is from the past now!
 

New member
Username: Dollface5566

Post Number: 9
Registered: Sep-10
Are there anyone who use Film?This is a digital era!
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2090
Registered: Oct-07
After Buying a FILM camera.....an old AE-1 or maybe the same vintage Nikon or even a Pentax, LEARN composition.
Store the ZOOM for later, too. Get a couple 'prime' lenses. For film? A 50mm is all you need to start....add a 28mm and a short telephoto later.....a 135mm is fine.
Take a class at the local JC. You won't learn anything from a memory card full of bad shots.

Now, Film IS history. Even the large format cameras have huge plate sensors. And are priced at the BMW level for a complete kit.

But, for someone starting out, nothing beats an inexpensive film camera for LEARNING. And for that matter, try B&W film, too.
Buy a good DSLR after you figure out IF you are going to stick with it and after you know more. I'll bet that 25% of all DSLRs out there are no more than door stops.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 24637
Registered: Jun-06
The digital world is taking over. Remember those Kodak booths for film drop offs? At least I do. There is just so much more available in storage and picture enhancement/photoshop abilities in the digital world that it leaves those toting around film a day in the past. Don't like a pic? Delete. Need a new batt? Swap. Email photos? No problem. Print at home? Just as easy. In fact it won't be too far into the future when wedding photographers will be taking donations of pics taken from guests using their Iphones, which are increasingly becoming very high rez cams. Technology is moving faster and faster.
 

New member
Username: Jim1987

Post Number: 1
Registered: May-11
I think you always should start with a digital camera.Its always safe and best way.Clicking with a digital camera is always very essay rather than analog film camera.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2333
Registered: Oct-07
Yes, digital is EASY and you can always use the DELETE button.

Now, tell me how to know if what you have is any good? Which ones do I delete?

I went to a friends wedding as a guest. I took about a dozen photos.
Turns out the bride likes one of my pictures better than any of the 'pros' stuff. Pro shot hundreds of OK pictures. I took the good one.

GO to a class at the local JC.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Plymouth

Canada

Post Number: 16222
Registered: Jan-08
Leo

The support has nothing to do with the picture result, the digital has the best definition and is friendlier to use!

All is in back of the camera!
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 2543
Registered: Oct-07
Film is better to learn on....
You learn discipline and slow down to learn composition instead of a camera 'system'.
Photography is not digits.

Go to a class at the local JC.

See my post and photo above:
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 15963
Registered: Dec-03
I really doubt you can convince anyone on the Film vs Digital nowadays. Discipline is important in the hobby, digital or not.
 

New member
Username: Fredia

America

Post Number: 3
Registered: Feb-12
You can ask your friends who understand it for help.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Project6

Post Number: 16202
Registered: Dec-03
Very astute, Frieda!
 

Bronze Member
Username: Ornello

Post Number: 26
Registered: Dec-12
Definitely start with film.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Columbia, South Carolina America

Post Number: 14873
Registered: Dec-03
I learned with film long before there was digital photography, however I'd recommend Digital. Otherwise you invest a ton of money in a good camera, lenses, accessories, and film, developing, chemicals and a dark kroom if you decide to learn to do your own developing, etc, and after all of that, it's still hard to even find decent 35mm film anymore. Why not just put all that money into a modern, current format, like a DSLR? Then you can learn to work with white balance and all of that instead of film, and you won't have to re-learn a bunch of stuff to shift from film to digital later.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3071
Registered: Oct-07
The idea is NOT to invest a lot in a film camera. You buy the 'training wheels' version with a single lens.
The goal is to learn Composition. All the rest? For digitial it is generally called 'workflow' and is its own particular PIA.
The darkroom skills you learn.....IF you actually learn them are directly transferrible to digital. UnSharp Mask, for example, is a darkroom technique which is now a Photoshop 'filter'. Color temperature is EASILY adjusted in digitial using the 'filters' drop down. I will, for example, use either the warming or cooling filters for subtle corrections. Stuff taken indoors which is too yellow can easily be made right using a cooling filter.

Learning a good photo from a bad photo is best done, IMO in a simple system meaning FILM. Once you can mentally overcome the urge to simply shoot hundreds of bad photos and concentrate on better photos, go ahead and get your DSLR. But THESE days? I'd even be a fan of one of the new Mirrorless interchageable lens cameras. I recently swapped out my EOS 1d and 5 'L' lenses for a mirrorless. Much less hassle and better low light performance. And some crazy neat built in features which save me LOTS of photoshop time.

Learners who are serious about learning need simple more than sophisticated. Neighbor guy just bought / sold and old Canon AE-1 outfit. The Camera was junky and the glass mediocre, but better stuff is out there. I still use my 120 camera and bring a SINGLE roll of 12 exposures when I use it. Great Results because I know when / what I want and don't need to cull thru hundreds of bad shots to get the one I want.
 

New member
Username: Rebby

Post Number: 1
Registered: Feb-16
I would play with some of the historical cameras to get a feel for the evolution of photography. Some of it can be really cool like pinhole cameras. Developing film is like half the fun!
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 3550
Registered: Oct-07
As times change, answers change, too.

These days? I doubt you can find many good, 'shooters' using film. So the problem becomes what to start with IF you want to get into photography.

Many very excellent Point and Shoot available. Some of these really make nice images when used properly. I'd STILL recommend keeping it simple to start.

No need to learn another computer system, which is what the modern camera really boils down to. I just bought a new Nikon Mirrorless Full Frame. This is a wonder of photography. And a very steep learning curve to get it to work 'MY' way. For example? I think checking 'depth of field' is useful. Blur of background can bring out the foreground subject setting it off from the rest. My first 35mm camera had a simple lever for this function. Now? I had to dig thru the menu and ASSIGN that function to a button. Focus detail? In the old days, my Twin Lens camera had, believe it or not, a Magnifying Glass which flipped into the viewfinder. (itself a simple hood) and you could detail focus like that. Now? Yet more digging thru helps and menus but now a simple button push magnifies the focus point image and I can focus to incredible detail.

The point is that MOST learners won't use these kinds of features or even be aware of the possibility. Start SIMPLE. Maybe even a used EOS Rebel. You can buy a better or more useful lens, and KEEP that if/when you upgrade to a new camera body. And for Pete's Sake don't spend a LOT of $$$. A used camera which gets you going and can be resold for value is much preferred to a NEW model which you end up using as a door-stop. Than selling for a fraction of the purchase price.

I Like the idea from rebby to 'play with a historical camera'. Too bad they are either now 'classics' and very expensive or beat half to death. Not to mention that film is getting more and more scarce with few processing it any longer.
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