Like

Electronic Cigarettes- ECigs

 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17070
Registered: Jan-06
If U are a cigarette smoker and really want to quit, then the simplest, fastest and cheapest way is to start using liquid vapor ECigs (electronic cigarettes)...they are amazing and very cheap, as low as $8 a month for most people who smoke 1- 1.5 packs a day now..myself and at least 10 other people I know started using these (called vaping because it produces a vapor that appears to be smoke but isn't), and quit regular cigarettes (analogs) immediately or within 3 days...I am not talking about using "blue" or "Njoy" fake Ecigs that are white and look like a fake cigarette, those are garbage and a waste of money and won't stop your urge to smoke cigarettes...I'm referring to the liquid refillable type ECigs that do contain nicotine but are flavored from tobacco to fruits and other flavors...and they are very inexpensive to start..a good starter kit (USB charger, AC charger, battery, refillable liquid filler cartomizer tank, neck lanyard and 10ml tobacco liquid for 7-14 days) can be bought for $30...then afterwards, the only cost after the initial starter kit is $8 a month (30ml liquid bottle) for flavored nicotine liquid until you finally quit smoking regular cigarettes which for most is less than 1 month..U can buy any flavored liquid (juice) U want with any strength (Mg) of nicotine (32-24-18-12-6-0)until U wean yourself and quit...with Ecigs , no more need for regular cigarteetes with tobacco with 420 nasty chemicals going into your lungs and blood stream and costing U tons of money to ruin your own health and those around you...many ppl will continue to use ECigs with 0 nicotine just because they like the flavor or like to continue the hand - mouth action they're use to for years of smoking..but many will also just quit ecigs and regular cigarettes , all together..

These Ecigs are becoming very popular worldwide and many Ecigs shops are opening everywere...Online there are hundreds of good sites and forums to google and learn more about these...Ecigs are legal in most all public places, and have no tobacco or smoke, or chemicals other than nicotine...using this works much better than nicotine patches, gum, pills, and gets cheap and fast results..for people that are serious about quitting smoking , this is the way to go..
 

Bronze Member
Username: Athena_

Post Number: 86
Registered: Jan-13
I was talking once to a guy that was selling these in Ontario... he said it was the newest thing out.... has anyone ever tried this out?
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17085
Registered: Jan-06
If ya want to know anything about ECigs, read here ...over a million posts,and tons of info...this is not a passing craze...this is for real..and works..I see over 100 strangers here daily vaping and using ECigs..and least 50 stores within 15 miles..and don't know 1 person who ever started vaping who did NOT quit smoking analogs/reg cigarettes..

http://www.e-cigarette-forum.com/forum/

Ecigs are the real deal and work ..and legit everywhere in public..
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17086
Registered: Jan-06
BTW..people have been using ECigs and became popular in 2009...they are not that new...just have been become more popluar now cuz the price of reg cigarettes have tripled the past few years cuz of GOV taxes and health concerns
 

Gold Member
Username: Big_edge_head

Milwaukee, WI

Post Number: 4516
Registered: Mar-07
I tried a Blu cig but my biggest problem is I don't know when to stop puffing on it. I don't even get a buzz from it. Maybe I'm not doing it right.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17089
Registered: Jan-06
Blu ECigs are not very good and have no throat click and no taste flavor like a reg cigarette/analog..and they are expensive...

the Ego style Ecigs that have E-Liquids (1000's of flavors)with a battery and clearomizer/tank/cartomizer that ya fill with the ELiquid are the best types of Ecigs and much cheaper than Blu's and much more like a real cigarette..and ya get a great throat hit/click and a nice taste flavor, with a ton of vapor that appears like smoke...but its all harmless cuz there's no tobacco and no 420 cancer causing chemicals..
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17090
Registered: Jan-06
Smoking E-cigarettes Touted as Way To Quit Smoking
Wednesday, 12 Jun 2013 06:54 AM

By Alexandra Ward from www.newsmax.com


E-cigarettes are being praised for their ability to help people quit smoking, but the Food and Drug Administration, World Health Organization, and the tobacco industry remain skeptical.

Advocates argue that e-cigarettes, an electronic inhaler containing nicotine that allows a user to mimic the act of smoking while still getting their fix, are healthier, cheaper, and less intrusive to nonsmokers than traditional cigarettes.

More than 45 million Americans smoke cigarettes, and about half of smokers try to quit each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


"The day I started with electronic cigarettes, that was it," Buddy Hall, a Pennsylvania e-cigarette user, told the Observer-Reporter. "I would not consider [an actual] cigarette today. People [who use them] still have an addiction to nicotine, but they’re not putting themselves at risk for cancer and other stuff."

But the FDA reported earlier this year that e-cigarettes do not necessarily encourage a smoker to quit. The WHO also expressed doubt that the electronic alternative to cigarettes would increase the number of nonsmokers.

The tobacco industry isn’t very happy about its new competition either. The sale of tobacco products in March dropped 4.5 percent from 2013 projections, according to analysts from Morgan Stanley.

It seems, however, that e-cigarettes are here to stay and may soon go mainstream as big tobacco sniffs out how they can get in on a piece of the sales. Altria, parent company of Philip Morris and the maker of Marlboro, will reportedly launch its own e-cigarette later this summer.

Last week, Reynolds American Inc., owner of the nation's second-biggest tobacco company, announced that it is launching a revamped version of its Vuse brand electronic cigarette in Colorado in July, with plans to expand nationally. Lorillard Inc., the nation's third-biggest tobacco company, acquired e-cigarette maker Blu Ecigs in April 2012 and has expanded to more than 80,000 retail outlets.


The government is concerned and want to TAX ECigs and BIG Businesses want a piece of the action since they all know that ECigs do work and are so popular now..
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17091
Registered: Jan-06
Do Electronic Cigarettes Really Help Smokers Quit?
The results of the first trials on the efficacy of e-cigarettes are due this year, offering new hope for a stubborn addiction

By Alisa Opar

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=do-electronic-cigarettes-help-s mokers-quit

Smoking electronic cigarettes helps some kick the habit.

Everyone knows that cigarettes are bad for you. Yet 45 million Americans smoke, a habit that shaves a decade off life expectancy and causes cancer as well as heart and lung diseases. Nearly 70 percent of smokers want to quit, but despite the deadly consequences, the vast majority of them fail.

Going cold turkey works for fewer than 10 percent of smokers. Even with counseling and the use of aids approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, such as the nicotine patch and non-nicotine medicines, 75 percent of smokers light up again within a year. â€We need better treatments because the current ones just aren’t working all that well,†says Jed Rose, director of the Duke Center for Smoking Cessation.

To create treatments that are more up to snuff, researchers are tinkering with combinations of existing drugs, looking at the role genetics plays in who gets hooked and turning to social media as a counseling platform. What’s more, a new smoking cessation medicine could be approved this year: electronic cigarettes, which have existed for a decade but only recently become the focus of efficacy trials.

The grip of addiction

Smoking at once relaxes and stimulates the body. Seconds after inhalation nicotine reaches the brain and binds to receptor molecules on nerve cells, triggering the cells to release a flood of dopamine and other neurotransmitters that washes over pleasure centers. A few more puffs increase heart rate, raising alertness. The effect does not last long, however, spurring smokers to light up again. Over time the number of nicotinic receptors increasesâ€"and the need to smoke again to reduce withdrawal symptoms such as irritability. On top of that, smoking becomes linked with everyday behavior or moods: drinking coffee or a bout of boredom, for instance, might also trigger the desire to reach for a cigaretteâ€"all making it difficult to kick the habit.

Smoking treatments help users gradually wean themselves off cigarettes or put an end to their cravingsâ€"most commonly via delivery of nicotine in patches or chewing gum. In addition, two non-nicotine drugs are available: a sustained-release form of the antidepressant bupropion reduces cravings; varenicline blocks nicotine receptors in the brain, reducing the flood of dopamine.

New research is teasing out why the seven FDA-approved medications have seen only limited success. For instance, researchers recently showed that some people are genetically predisposed to have difficulty quitting: Particular variations in a cluster of nicotinic receptor genes (CHRNA5â€"CHRNA3â€"CHRNB4) contribute to nicotine dependence and a pattern of heavy smoking. Moreover, a study of more than 1,000 smokers reported in a 2012 The American Journal of Psychiatry paper found that people with the risk genes don’t quit easily on their own whereas those lacking the risk genes are more likely to kick the habit without medications.

New research also suggests that the sexes respond differently to the drugs. Rose and colleagues have found that giving a combination of bupropion and varenicline to people who have worn a nicotine patch for a week raised the quit rate of patch users to 50.9 percent up from 19.6 percentâ€"but only in men. â€We don’t know why the effect seemed entirely confined to male smokers,†Rose says. â€Bit by bit we’re starting to learn how to tailor treatment to sex, early response to nicotine patches, and genomic markers.â€

New treatment hope

A reason for the limited success of nicotine treatments may be that they do not address a crucial aspect of cigarette use: the cues that prompt smoking. Electronic cigarettes have as a result become a popular alternative to lighting up for those seeking to quit. E-cig users inhale doses of vaporized nicotine from battery-powered devices that look like cigarettes. Carcinogen levels in e-cig vapor are about one thousandth that of cigarette smoke, according to a 2010 study in the Journal of Public Health Policy.

Anecdotal evidence indicates that the devices, on the market for about a decade, help smokers quit. Yet there’s little hard science to back up the claim, and the gadgets are not regulated as medicines. (In 2010 a court overturned the FDA’s effort to treat e-cigs as â€drug delivery devices.â€) â€We just don’t know if they are as good as existing nicotine-replacement therapies,†says David Abrams, executive director of the nonprofit Schroeder Institute for Tobacco Research and Policy Studies and former director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research at the National Institutes of Health.

That’s about to change. Two e-cig trials will report results this year. The first is a study of 300 smokers in Italy. It is a follow-up to a similar study in which 22 of 40 hard-core smokers had after six months either quit or cut cigarette consumption by more than half. Nine gave up cigarettes entirely, although six continued using e-cigs. The findings of the larger study, which are under peer review, are â€in line with those reported in our small pilot study,†says lead researcher Riccardo Polosa of the University of Catania in Italy.*

Interestingly, he adds, a control group of smokers who used an e-cig without nicotine also showed a significant drop in tobacco cigarette consumptionâ€"although not as great as those using the nicotine e-cig. This decline, he says, â€suggests that the dependence on the cigarette is not only a matter of nicotine but also of other factors involved,†like the need to relieve stress or activities that trigger smokers to reach for a cigarette.



.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17092
Registered: Jan-06
Electronic cigarettes used by smokers who want to kick the habit show no connection to heart disease, according to a study that adds to evidence of health benefits of switching from tobacco to smokeless alternatives.

E-cigarettes, electronic tubes that simulate the effect of smoking by producing nicotine vapor, prompted no adverse effects on cardiac function in the study, researchers from the Athens- based Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center said in a report presented at the European Society of Cardiology annual meeting in Munich today.

Investigators examined the heart activity of 200 young daily smokers after one ordinary cigarette against 200 people who smoked an electronic cigarette for 7 minutes. Whereas tobacco smokers showed â€significant†disruptions of functions such as heartbeats or blood pressure, the effect of e-cigarettes on the heart was non existent, Konstantinos Farsalinos, one of the researchers, said in the presentation.

â€Currently available data suggest that electronic cigarettes are not harmful, and substituting tobacco with electronic cigarettes is more beneficial to health,†Farsalinos said.

Industrywide e- cigarette sales this year are likely to double from $500 million in 2013, according to UBS AG.

Psychological Effects

Electronic cigarettes, which mimic the look and feel of traditional versions without generating smoke and ash, are one of the few smoking alternatives that provide users with their chemical need for nicotine and reproduce the psychological effect of holding and smoking a cigarette, the researcher said.

Makers of the battery-powered devices include Lorillard Inc. (LO:US), a Greensboro, North Carolina-based producer of standard cigarettes, which acquired Blue Ecigs for $135 million in April 2012. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has yet to impose rules on the testing and production of e-cigarettes.

About 5 million people use e-cigarettes in the U.S., according to an estimate by the Tobacco Vapor Electronic Cigarette Association.

Although nicotine is present in the devices’ vapor, it is absorbed by the blood at a far slower rate than tobacco smoke, accounting for the lower levels of toxicity, Farsalinos said. No traces of nitrosamine were found in the e-cigarettes in the study, he said.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17093
Registered: Jan-06
Everyone knows that cigarettes are bad for you. Yet 45 million Americans smoke, a habit that shaves a decade off life expectancy and causes cancer as well as heart and lung diseases. Nearly 70 percent of smokers want to quit, but despite the deadly consequences, the vast majority of them fail.

Going cold turkey works for fewer than 10 percent of smokers. Even with counseling and the use of aids approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, such as the nicotine patch and non-nicotine medicines, 75 percent of smokers light up again within a year. â€We need better treatments because the current ones just aren’t working all that well,†says Jed Rose, director of the Duke Center for Smoking Cessation.

To create treatments that are more up to snuff, researchers are tinkering with combinations of existing drugs, looking at the role genetics plays in who gets hooked and turning to social media as a counseling platform. What’s more, a new smoking cessation medicine could be approved this year: electronic cigarettes, which have existed for a decade but only recently become the focus of efficacy trials.

The grip of addiction

Smoking at once relaxes and stimulates the body. Seconds after inhalation nicotine reaches the brain and binds to receptor molecules on nerve cells, triggering the cells to release a flood of dopamine and other neurotransmitters that washes over pleasure centers. A few more puffs increase heart rate, raising alertness. The effect does not last long, however, spurring smokers to light up again. Over time the number of nicotinic receptors increasesâ€"and the need to smoke again to reduce withdrawal symptoms such as irritability. On top of that, smoking becomes linked with everyday behavior or moods: drinking coffee or a bout of boredom, for instance, might also trigger the desire to reach for a cigaretteâ€"all making it difficult to kick the habit.

Smoking treatments help users gradually wean themselves off cigarettes or put an end to their cravingsâ€"most commonly via delivery of nicotine in patches or chewing gum. In addition, two non-nicotine drugs are available: a sustained-release form of the antidepressant bupropion reduces cravings; varenicline blocks nicotine receptors in the brain, reducing the flood of dopamine.

New research is teasing out why the seven FDA-approved medications have seen only limited success. For instance, researchers recently showed that some people are genetically predisposed to have difficulty quitting: Particular variations in a cluster of nicotinic receptor genes (CHRNA5â€"CHRNA3â€"CHRNB4) contribute to nicotine dependence and a pattern of heavy smoking. Moreover, a study of more than 1,000 smokers reported in a 2012 The American Journal of Psychiatry paper found that people with the risk genes don’t quit easily on their own whereas those lacking the risk genes are more likely to kick the habit without medications.

New research also suggests that the sexes respond differently to the drugs. Rose and colleagues have found that giving a combination of bupropion and varenicline to people who have worn a nicotine patch for a week raised the quit rate of patch users to 50.9 percent up from 19.6 percentâ€"but only in men. â€We don’t know why the effect seemed entirely confined to male smokers,†Rose says. â€Bit by bit we’re starting to learn how to tailor treatment to sex, early response to nicotine patches, and genomic markers.â€

New treatment hope

A reason for the limited success of nicotine treatments may be that they do not address a crucial aspect of cigarette use: the cues that prompt smoking. Electronic cigarettes have as a result become a popular alternative to lighting up for those seeking to quit. E-cig users inhale doses of vaporized nicotine from battery-powered devices that look like cigarettes. Carcinogen levels in e-cig vapor are about one thousandth that of cigarette smoke, according to a 2010 study in the Journal of Public Health Policy.

Anecdotal evidence indicates that the devices, on the market for about a decade, help smokers quit. Yet there’s much hard science to back up the claim, and the gadgets are not regulated as medicines. (In 2010 a court overturned the FDA’s effort to treat e-cigs as â€drug delivery devices.â€) h.

Two e-cig trials will report results this year. The first is a study of 300 smokers in Italy. It is a follow-up to a similar study in which 380 of 400 hard-core smokers had after six months either quit or cut cigarette consumption by more than half. The findings of the larger study, which are under peer review, are â€in line with those reported in our previous pilot studies,†says lead researcher Riccardo Polosa of the University of Catania in Italy.*

Interestingly, he adds, a control group of smokers who used an e-cig without nicotine also showed a significant drop in tobacco cigarette consumptionâ€"although not as great as those using the nicotine e-cig. This decline, he says, â€suggests that the dependence on the cigarette is not only a matter of nicotine but also of other factors involved,†like the need to relieve stress or activities that trigger smokers to reach for a cigarette.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17094
Registered: Jan-06
A new study has suggested that electronic cigarettes, the battery-powered devices that provide tobacco-less doses of nicotine in a vaporized solution, are much safer than real cigarettes.

Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher Michael Siegel said that the review is the first to comprehensively examine scientific evidence about the safety and effectiveness of electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigarettes.

"Few, if any, chemicals at levels detected in electronic cigarettes raise serious health concerns. Although the existing research does not warrant a conclusion that electronic cigarettes are safe in absolute terms and further clinical studies are needed to comprehensively assess the safety of electronic cigarettes, a preponderance of the available evidence shows them to be much safer than tobacco cigarettes and comparable in toxicity to conventional nicotine replacement products," said the authors.


For study, the researchers reviewed 16 laboratory studies that identified the components in electronic cigarette liquid and vapor. The authors found that carcinogen levels in electronic cigarettes are up to 1,000 times lower than in tobacco cigarettes.

"The FDA and major anti-smoking groups keep saying that we don't know anything about what is in electronic cigarettes. The truth is, we know a lot more about what is in electronic cigarettes than regular cigarettes," said Siegel.

The report also reviewed preliminary evidence that electronic cigarettes can be effective in suppressing the urge to smoke, largely because they simulate the act of smoking a real cigarette.

The authors also argued that E-cigarettes might also offer an advantage over traditional nicotine delivery devices because smoking-related stimuli alone have been found capable of suppressing tobacco abstinence symptoms for long periods of time.

The review will be published in the upcoming issue of Journal of Public Health Policy. (ANI)
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17095
Registered: Jan-06
Smoking used to be sexy. Look at Mad Men or Humphrey Bogart. But that was then. These days, Americans are buying fewer cigarettes. Just this week, U.S. tobacco companies released their first quarter earnings, and, unsurprisingly, cigarette sales were down from last year.

But that doesn't mean tobacco companies aren't still profitable. Smoke-free products like e-cigarettes are marketed as a less harmful alternative. And, for now at least, you can puff them indoors.

E-cigarettes are made to look like regular cigarettes, but they're far more complicated.

"It's an electronic device that uses a battery, and it heats an liquid nicotine solution that users then inhale like they would a traditional cigarette," explains reporter Michael Felberbaum, who wrote about the trend for the Associated Press.

Smoking Freely, For Now

You may have already seen e-cigarettes for sale at your local drugstore. So have all the major tobacco companies, and they want to compete.

"As of very recently, all of the top tobacco companies have announced plans or already have an electronic cigarette on the market," Felberbaum says.

Altria, the company that brought you the Marlboro Man â€" is the last American tobacco company to say they plan to release an e-cigarette later this year. They're behind tobacco company Lorillard Inc., who purchased the e-cigarette maker Blu last year.

Freedom to puff on an e-cigarette indoors might sound great to smokers sick of looking like aging hoodlums in doorways, but e-cigarette fans shouldn't necessarily get used to it. Local governments are already taking steps to limit e-smoking in places where traditional smoking is banned.

Regulation May Be On The Way

The FDA warns that more research needs to be done on the health risks of inhaling liquid nicotine.

"The FDA has said that it plans to assert regulatory authority over electronic cigarettes. And that could lead to them being regulated in the same way as cigarettes as far as marketing is concerned," Felberbaum says.

That hasn't stopped people calling them an effective way to quit smoking. Actress Katherine Heigl even puffed one on the Late Show with David Letterman in 2010. However, because of the way e-cigarettes are classified, manufacturers can't advertise the product that way.

"The companies are not allowed to market them as smoking cessation devices because that would put them in the category of other nicotine replacement products that are regulated by the FDA, such as nicotine gum or patches," Felberbaum says.

So for now, e-cigarette smokers can pretty much puff away, and they are.
Industry experts say U.S. sales could even reach 1 billion this year.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17115
Registered: Jan-06
Cigarette Ingredients ...4000 chemicals

Cigarette Ingredients

Chemicals in Tobacco Smoke
There are over 4,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke and at least 69 of those chemicals are known to cause cancer.

The list of 599 additives approved by the US Government for use in the manufacture of cigarettes is something every smoker should see. Submitted by the five major American cigarette companies to the Dept. of Health and Human Services in April of 1994, this list of ingredients had long been kept a secret.

Tobacco companies reporting this information were:
American Tobacco Company
Brown and Williamson
Liggett Group, Inc.
Philip Morris Inc.
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company


While these ingredients are approved as additives for foods, they were not tested by burning them, and it is the burning of many of these substances which changes their properties, often for the worse. Over 4000 chemical compounds are created by burning a cigarette �€" 69 of those chemicals are known to cause cancer. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen cyanides and ammonia are all present in cigarette smoke. Forty-three known carcinogens are in mainstream smoke, sidestream smoke or both. It's chilling to think about not only how smokers poison themselves, but what others are exposed to by breathing in the secondhand smoke. The next time you're missing your old buddy, the cigarette, take a good long look at this list and see them for what they are: a delivery system for toxic chemical and carcinogens.

here's a list of the more chemicals in a cigarette..

http://www.tricountycessation.org/tobaccofacts/Cigarette-Ingredients.html#list
 

Silver Member
Username: Athena_

Post Number: 212
Registered: Jan-13
Hi LK

This is DJ from the satellite TV forum (in case the name fools you LOL )I don't come to this site very often anymore, but I'm getting very interested in trying out the E Cigarettes and you are the only one I trust to give me this information regarding this matter.

If you still have my email address, perhaps you could send me some more information regarding this matter and where I might buy a starter kit ordering it off line just to try them out. If you want to send me a PM that's ok too.

I am a very heavy smoker and the smokes I buy off the reserves are getting pathetic. Not in price but quality. So I thought perhaps trying out the E cigs might help me stop smoking.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17116
Registered: Jan-06
Doreen...email me..U should have a few of mine...gmail..yahoo..etc...would be good to talk to ya and I can help you out with the eCig thing...U will never smoke another nasty costly tobacco cigarette in your life...and this will cost you less than $5 a month..I bought 2 pubs and sell eCigs there and have helped hundreds of people to stop smoking tobacco cigarettes..they are NOT allowed to smoke tobacco cigs in my pubs cause of the law, but can smoke eCigs and they love them and save a lot of money and their health is much better now as well as their pockets..I got into this about 6 years ago when I quit smoking and have learned a lot since then..
 

Platinum Member
Username: Lklives

Post Number: 17117
Registered: Jan-06
Doreen...email me..U should have a few of mine...gmail..yahoo..etc...would be good to talk to ya and I can help you out with the eCig thing...OR U CAN PM ME HERE NOW
« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Add Your Message Here

Bold text Italics Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image Add a YouTube Video
Need to Register?
Forgot Password?
Enable HTML code in message
   

Facebook

Main Forums Today's Posts

Forum Help

Follow Us