Like

Home brewed beer.

 

Gold Member
Username: Southernrebel

Monroe, Louisiana Team Audible...

Post Number: 8244
Registered: Mar-04
Yep, that's what I have been up to lately.

This is my first batch of home brewed beer. Started it about a week ago and today I'm bottling. Just pulled to lid on my brew and I'm priming it for bottling now

Couple pics of my ~6gal batch of Pale Ale. Should be ready for a taste test mid-week.

Upload
Mixing up the brew on day 1.
Upload
Fermenter.
Upload
The way it stands today....just mixed in the priming sugars

Fermenting stopped yesterday, so I'm bottling today.

Going to let it settle for 30mins, then bottling begins.
I didn't have bottles, so mason jars will have to do this time around....pints and quarts.

More pics later.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23461
Registered: Jun-06
Nice. I looked into home brewing but backed down after I realized the cost. You THINK it saves you $$ but in reality it can be more expensive depending on your tastes.



However, it does give you the ability to control the amount of alcohol your final product yields. Which can be......................fun.
 

Gold Member
Username: Southernrebel

Monroe, Louisiana Team Audible...

Post Number: 8246
Registered: Mar-04
Well, I originally bought the fermenter to make some wine, but I couldn't get ahold of enough wild grapes (possum grapes) around the house....so I started off w/ a beer from extract.

Initial cost for the kit was ~$45.

Here it is bottled up.

Upload
Upload

Ended up a little darker than I thought is would.

I'm going to get some apples and try a cider next. Should be interesting.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23593
Registered: Jun-06
Dude.......I just bought that same start up kit! I chose the American Light ale flavor. I boil and start fermenting tomorrow. My kit cost $110 and the ale kit another $40. THEN I bought a 22 quart stainless steel pot that set me back another $70.


I'm stoked. Tell me how your batch works for you. I realize the $$ savings isn't there like I said before but your control on taste and alcohol content is priceless, which is why I decided to ultimately go forth with this. More sugar=boyaaaaaaaaa. Lol.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23634
Registered: Jun-06
I transferred my beer tonight into my 5 gallon glass carboy for the remainder of the fermentation process. I'm looking at Sunday/Monday for bottling. I added extra malt for more alcohol content.


This shit can be addictive. I can already smell the beer lol.



Upload
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23635
Registered: Jun-06
And Canaan, where did you get your kit for $45? My kit was $110. Then I had to buy the American Light ale ingredient kit which was $40. THEN my 22 quart stainless steel pot was $70.



Either way I'm anxious to taste it in a couple weeks lol.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Insearchofbass

2 hifonics 2607s, 2dcSounds12xls SPL\idmax12SQ

Post Number: 15544
Registered: Jun-04
why didnt you ask him before you bought the stuff paul
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23644
Registered: Jun-06
I need a home brewed beer at this point.......................................
 

Platinum Member
Username: Insearchofbass

2 hifonics 2607s, 2dcSounds12xls SPL\idmax12SQ

Post Number: 15555
Registered: Jun-04
I dont drink beer much but ill be with you in spirit.
 

Gold Member
Username: Southernrebel

Monroe, Louisiana Team Audible...

Post Number: 8308
Registered: Mar-04
My kit....fermenter, hydrometer, siphon, brew book...etc was ~$45 from a local wine cellar. The 'concentrate' kit was $25, all i had to do is boil w/ sugar and add yest for my first batch.

I did secondary fermentation in mason jars...and I WARN YOU NOW....DO NOT USE MASON JARS!!!!
I lost a few bottles due to the lids popping off. Get beer bottles and cap them. If you can find enough Grolsh bottles w/ the flip-top, clean and use them w/ a new o-ring.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Bestmankind

Post Number: 23723
Registered: Oct-05
the lids were popping off due to the carbonation?
 

Gold Member
Username: Southernrebel

Monroe, Louisiana Team Audible...

Post Number: 8309
Registered: Mar-04
Yep, the pressure popped em.
Mason jars are built for suction not pressure.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23646
Registered: Jun-06
Well tomorrow or Saturday I'll be off to the farmer's mart. There's a guy there that sells home brewing and wine supplies. I'm hoping he has 22oz or larger bottles. The caps are cheap as heck so no worries there. I'm curious though cause even though it's only been 4 days since brewing my beer hasn't cleared any. It still has a cider look to it. I'm assuming it will clear in the next 3-4 days. We'll see.
 

Gold Member
Username: Wolf_hound

Phoenix, AZ

Post Number: 1299
Registered: Sep-05
Wonder how is gonna turn out... How was your beer canaan?
 

Gold Member
Username: Southernrebel

Monroe, Louisiana Team Audible...

Post Number: 8310
Registered: Mar-04
As you can see in my pics, mine didn't clear up. It was a pail ale though, so it was supposed to be dark...give it at least a week to 10days for primary fermentation. Wait until you on longer see any bubbles coming from the vent and then give it another day.

Let it go thru secondary fermentation for at least a week also. Don't prime the bottles one by one. Siphon off the batch and prime the whole thing, then bottle from the primed batch.

My beer turned out ALOT like a Murphy's Red. Not as solid a head, but had I allowed it to go thru secondary longer it would have worked out better. Nice pail ale though.

You will have sediment in your bottles, just decant to a glass and leave the sediment in the bottle. Enjoy.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 1683
Registered: Oct-07
Canaan.
Do NOT use wood for anything. You simply Can NOT sanitize it.
May be OK for most of boil, but at some point, when it cools, the wood will work against you.

Please, also, get a capper and go for a dumpster dive for some Kirin warclubs.....22oz and FREE at the local Japanese restaurant.

And while you're at it, get a glass 5 gallon bottle, like Sparkletts used to have. It can be sanitized and will last forever. When, not, IF you scratch the plastic, you'll end up with 'microbe traps' which are difficult to sanitize.

Best of luck. Read Papazian's book.
 

Gold Member
Username: Magfan

USA

Post Number: 1684
Registered: Oct-07
Paul, you don't need a 22 quart cooker, unless you are making larger than 5 gallon batches. I boil about 2 gallons and than add water to the 5 gallon mark.
The only problem I have is hops uptake, which is lower in higher gravity boils.
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23651
Registered: Jun-06
Well the larger pot helps with overflow of the boil. There was only a $10 difference between the 16 quart and 22 at the store so it was a no brainer for me. My beer is currently in my 5 gallon glass carboy and will be so until Sunday/Monday when I bottle. Then 2 weeks before refrigeration. As of today it still has a cider color/consistency to it. Bubbling has dropped significantly but still occurring. I still need to get another siphon system and will look into it when I get the bottles.


There's a good deal of patience needed for this hobby. You're looking at almost a month's worth of waiting, but to me should be worth it.
 

Gold Member
Username: Mrskullz1

New York

Post Number: 1857
Registered: Feb-07
so is the beer you make usually better than what you get from the stores?

Or are you making it just for fun?
 

Diamond Member
Username: Wingmanalive

Www.stainles... .ecrater.com

Post Number: 23654
Registered: Jun-06
Better is in the eye of the beholder. You don't brew to save $$ but for other reasons.

1). Control on taste. With literally 100's of ingredients your final brew is like a painting, unique and almost different every time. Because of the vast amounts large breweries produce it's easier to mimick the same outcome on each batch in regards to flavor, body and freshness. When you brew in increments of 5 gallons at a shot there's less room for error.

2). Control on ABV. While many beers boast an alcohol content of 5%+/-, you can brew your beer to levels far higher to suite your liking.

3). Shear enjoyment Skullz. Once you find that perfect marriage of hops, malt, sugar, yeast and other agents it becomes a proud hobby. Kinda like Mom's apple pie compared to that store bought stuff in boxes on shelves. I can only imagine that store bought beer will always taste different now. Sub par if you will lol.
« Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Facebook

Shop Related Deals

Directory

Main Forums

Today's Posts

Forum Help

Follow Us