Coaxial Digital Connection Vs Digital Fiber Optical Connection?

 

I have been wondering since I bought AV receiver a month ago that

1. What is the real difference between Coaxial Digital Connection and Digital Fiber Optical Connection?

2. Which is latest and better? How?
Any real good information is appreciated!
Thanks!
 

Anonymous
Coaxial and Optical are the same over short runs. Over very long runs, Optical is better at preserving the signal, since it has a lower amount of signal degradation.
 

hi all ..
i am a student from saudi arabia can u help me to give me report data sheet about( optical fiber connection and splicing) between 4- 8 pages.
please help me quiclly.
 

RayBan
one of the DIFFERENCES is an optical cable needs to have the signal converted to light pulses and the coaxial cable will pass along the digital signal without any conversion.
 

Derek
When correctly connected, Coax and Optical should be exactly the same. Bandwidth isn't and issue, error correction (when connected correctly) isn't and issue. Distance, say over 50 feet might lean toward optical but who does that? Optical cables can be miles long compared to copper's hundreds of feet for the same amount of signal loss. Optical cable can be fragile and cannot be taken around corners too tightly or pinched. For all intents and purposes though, it doesn't make a difference which one you use.

Now, having said that, there are a couple of situation where one MIGHT be better than the other. They both fall under "defective equipment" though.

1. The CD data, though optical, is converted to a electrical signal. To create an optical signal, this elctrical signal - essentially the coax signal, has to be convered to optical by a laser-diode. You could theorize that am optical signal could not be superior to a coax signal because it is derived from the coax signal. I would not worry about it though.

2. Optical connections do not carry grounds. In a pooly designed system an optical connection COULD produce less hum because there are fewer ground paths. The music to the decoder would not be any better but a crappy amp could add hum to an otherwise pristine music signal just before it got to the speakers. This hum would be faily obvious though.

Again, if you have good equipment, use either one.
 

I am currently connecting my DVD player to my AV Yamaha amp by means of digital coax. However, my DVD has Dig Coax out, and the only input for digital coax on my AV amp is for CD. Although when playing DVD's I have to set the audio input to be CD, the amp will recognise a Dolby Digital signal but it will NOT recognise a DTS signal. I'm assuming thats because the CD digital in does not pass through a DTS decoder.

Any thoughts?
 

Derek
Does you Yamaha do DTS decoding. You would be supprised at how many receivers don't.
 

Anonymous
Nick,
1) Check the settings on your DVD player regarding DTS output.
2) Make certain the input settings for the CD input is set to "Auto". On my Yamaha 730, this is done by pushing the CD input.

Hope this helps
 

Brett W
NIK: I just asked Yamaha about RX-V740 CD coax port (only one available, 2 on higher-up mnodels!!), and they say it can be used for any digital audio source and will decode DD/DTS. I can also re-assign this port to a different input (e.g. so CBL or D-TV use this port).
 

Tony Jacklin
Unregistered guest
Brett: I have the same problem as nik but with a yamaha rxv440. How do you switch the port to a different input, eg DVD? Any other tips about how to ensure that the DVD DTS or DOlby Digital signal is getting properly decoded over the CD Coaxial input?
 

Anonymous
 
I would guess it's the same on the RX-V440, but on my RX-V740 you can change the input on the "DVD" input to use input "1D" I believe which is the digital coaxial. I have set it like this and it works like a charm.. so I can select DVD and have it pickup the signal from the port labeled "CD" on the back of the receiver.(digital coax) and again, should probably be a similar setup on the RX-V440. just read the manual (hopefully you still have)
 

Anonymous
 
Why is the bandwidth of a fiber optical cable higher then of a coaxial cable>?
 

Unregistered guest
Hi
I'm going to buy a Bose Lifestyle 12 Series II to a friend, I want to know if I connect a DVD through the digital coaxil the system will decode 5.1 sound and play it in a proper way like if I had a DVD with home theater included.
 

Unregistered guest
My home theatre system had "satalite"- "DVD" digital optical out. If I run two optical out to a sony digital optical switcher and then connect out put to digital optical receiver and another to Sony infared wireless Dolby DTS surround sound headphones, will my optical connection be superior to connecting to analog headphone jack connections?? Will it be true DTS Dolby Surround sound
 

Unregistered guest
because these connections are digital, they cannot produce hum. there should be no difference in quality between these mediums, unless your sending over large distances. in this case, use optical: it is immune to radio interference (which probably makes little difference any way) and has less signal degridaton.
 

Unregistered guest
I will be purchasing Denon 2910 DVD and 3805 receiver. What are the differences / advantages between the 5.1 channel out and digital out connections on the DVD player?
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 278
Registered: Jun-04
The S/PDIF (coaxial or digital) interconnect max bitrate is too low to handle SACD and DVD-A. Therefore a 5.1 analogue interconnect is often seen on player and receivers.

More recent digital interconnects, such as HDMI, handles easily SACD and DVD-A bitstream. At least in theory, I'm not sure it has been implemented yet.

Cheers
AL

 

E. Ramsey
Unregistered guest
Actually Mr. Lane bit rate has nothing to do with the cable type. Bit rate or amount is determined by the processor, the integrated circuit that is responsible for the digital signal output. A coaxial or optical is used for 24 bit 96khz or 192khz audio, so it in effect would be quite capable of handling the output of a dvd audio processor output which is up to 24 bit 192khz. The reason these formats (dvd audio, sacd) use an analog output is a matter of piracy. Record companies do not want consumers to be able to digitally copy dvd audio or sacd in its pure digital form. Also the outputs are analog so that the signal will have the linear smoothness of analog. E. Ramsey AAS industrial electronics
 

Unregistered guest
One of the cons of optical is that it must get converted right? But doesn't coax get converted before it is sent to the speakers by the receiver (from digital to speaker wire signal)? If it is not converted, then why not use coax cables from the receiver to each speaker?
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 299
Registered: Jun-04
Yes, there is a digital to analogue conversion. Speakers (as we know them...) need an amplified analogue signal. The benefit of digital interconnect is to transfer bitstream all the way to receiver and convert it there, just before pre-amplification stage.

Cheers
AL
 

E.Ramsey
Unregistered guest
Gibranoptical, a coaxial digital signal,like a optical digital signal, must be converted to analog for the pre-amplification stage before being sent to the amplifier then to the speakers. E. Ramsey AAS industrial electronics
 

Anonymous
 
Hi,

Does anyone knows whats the diffrent between a digital coaxial cable to a regular/video RCA coaxial 75Ohm cable?
Thanks

OOD.
 

E. Ramsey
Unregistered guest
Yes. A coaxial digital cable has a solid conductor, whereas a standard rca connector"red-white" has a stranded connector. E. Ramsey AAS industrial electronics
 

E. Ramsey
Unregistered guest
OOPS! Sorry anonymous,I meant a stranded "conductor" not connector. E. Ramsey AAS industrial electronics.
 

J. Vigne
Unregistered guest
http://www.meridian-audio.com/g_bro_gseries.htm

Not many Americans know Meridian well. They have been at the front of digital audio product development for the last twenty years. Their MLP (Meridian Lossless Packing) is the mandated standard for DVD Audio. To my knowledge they are the only audio company that can provide a true digital path from the source to the point where the signal leaves the X-over in the loudspeakers to finally be sent to the individual drivers as an analog signal.

From the Meridian web site: "G Series components are the ideal companions for the extensive range of Meridian DSP Loudspeakers, resulting in a digital stereo or surround theatre system in which the signal path is digital from beginning to end, conversion to analogue occurring only as the final step."

http://www.meridian-audio.com/g_bro_gseries.htm


 

skool girl
Unregistered guest
hey there,
i doing work for skool and need to no wat the difference between digital and analogue technology is?Applling o a computer.
 

New member
Username: Eramsey

South carolina United States

Post Number: 4
Registered: Feb-05
Yep, J.Vigne, I have heard of Meridian-(a Boyd Stuart Co.) as they make one of the finest digital surround pre/pros that money can buy. E. Ramsey AAS industrial electronics
 

da_killer
Unregistered guest
on my stereo i have somethink called a "digital optical out" for connecting it to an MD deck.-if i wanted to connect this to the normal input port of a computer what would i need to do it?
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 342
Registered: Jun-04
You would need a sound card with "digital optical in". Check that both units work with same format (i.e. Toslink).

Cheers
AL
 

Unregistered guest
Hello,

I have a CD player and DVD player that have digital output capability (via Coax) along with a receiver that can input both. Since I noticed that the digital coaxial cables have he exact same connectors as regular old RCA cables, I decided to try using an old $2 cable instead of running out and spending $30 on a 3' coaxial cable. Everything appears to be working fine. Personally, I doubt there would be bandwidth issues over a 3' range.

However, I am uncertain as to any impedence mismatch problems that could occur (if any). Is there any reason why I shouldn't be using a regular old RCA cable? Is there any possibility of damaging my equipment by doing so?

Thanks.

Mark Alan
 

Schiz
Unregistered guest
There is definitely a risk of damage to the electronics. There is a reason the component cables are expensive. Not to mention the fact that they are heavily shielded.
 

J Stone
Unregistered guest
Here's s ques...
I have a Sony STR-DE697 7.1 receiver and just bought an LG DVB418 dvd player. I am connecting the dvd player to the amp via optical cable into the Video 2 slot. The problem is that the amp won't detect the multi-channel like it once did w/ my piece of crap Sharp dvd player. It will only accept Left ffron, right front, and sub....what the nuts?
 

J Stone
Unregistered guest
Here's s ques...
I have a Sony STR-DE697 7.1 receiver and just bought an LG DVB418 dvd player. I am connecting the dvd player to the amp via optical cable into the Video 2 slot. The problem is that the amp won't detect the multi-channel like it once did w/ my piece of crap Sharp dvd player. It will only accept Left ffron, right front, and sub....what the nuts?
 

New member
Username: Sambottros

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-05
Digital and analogue interconnects appear to be very similar. However, digital coaxial outputs require a cable with an impedance of 75 Ohms to perform at their best. The two most commonly found digital outputs on CD and DVD players are coaxial and optical. A coaxial signal is transmitted electrically, whilst an optical signal is transmitted via light pulses along a fibre optic cable, fitted with a Toslink connector. As a general rule, if you have the option, the digital coaxial connector produces a better sound than the optical.

The other connection option that is occasionally found on some equipment is called AES EBU. In this case the connection is made with 3 pin XLR connectors and the impedance is set at 110 Ohms.
The same rules that are used to choose an analogue interconnect apply to digital interconnects. Despite the fact that digital connectors are only transferring digital data, the construction and design of the digital cable affects the tonal, rhythmic and dynamic performance qualities every bit as much as analogue interconnects do.
 

Anonymous
 
Are there switches for digital coaxial cable. I am trying to use to cd players into one coaxial input. A switch would allow me to use bothe units with digital sound.
I hope this is not a dumb question
 

New member
Username: Brokenamp

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-05
I recently purchased an Amp and through stupidy managed to break the trap door which is used by the amp to keep the audio fiber secure. I am considering just switching to coax so I do not have the expense of repairing the fiber connection. I know even though it was dumb the trap door is really a poor design.
 

New member
Username: Mrjazzjr

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-05
I have searched for a 3.5mm mini plug adapter to use with a coaxial audio cable. I hope someone can direct me to a source.
 

Unregistered guest
I recently bought a pair of RADIA 520 speakers, two pair of Von Schweikert wall speakers and one Von S. center speaker. What processor and amplifier should I get to optimize these speakers for my home theater system?
 

morf
Unregistered guest
The coaxial output is likely to be better quality with higher end equipment because it is jitter free, unlike the optical output. The signal gets transported better. The significant changes in audio I have heard when differentiating coaxial and optical were generally a fuller sound, with more life, not as neutral and analytical as the optical one.

Hope that helps
 

Unregistered guest
Hi Guys, I have a Digital Optical cable running from my Sony DVD Player to the back of my Sony HiFi. This worked great for a while then suddenly stopped working. Am I right in thinking that these cables are very fragile and if bent too much can break inside and stop working? Or could it be either unit which has decided to suddenly stop playing? When the DVD Player is on, there is a red light coming out of the Digital Out socket. If I plug one end of the cable into this, am I meant to see the light at the other end of the cable or am I being Immensley stupid?!
 

Brett R.
Unregistered guest
Coaxial is ALWAYS better than Tos-Link (optical). Optical has a higher amount of jitter (timing error). Also, Optical has to be converted from digital to light, then back from light to digital on the other end. Too much conversion going on there. Optical usually tends to be more brighter, and harsher sounding. Coaxial has a smoother presentation, and has better frequency coherancy; due too having and electrical based interface, and less jitter.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Diverhank

Huntington Beach, CA

Post Number: 13
Registered: Sep-05
Brett, I thought the info from a cd and DVD originally is optical not digital so your data on the digital coax has already been converted already, it's not pure. Also, Jitter affects all digital data, not isolated to optical cables and jitter can be easily filtered out. I agree with some posters herein that the quality of the conversion circuitry of your device is much more important than the type of cable (coax/toslink).
 

Unregistered guest
Darran,
Be sure you have not accidently changed the input selection on your Sony reciever. It should be set to either AUTO or Fiber (some abbrev. name like "fbr cbl?).

Maybe one of your kids was playing with it, I know mine always tend to cause this type of mischievous problems.
 

Darran Beard
Unregistered guest
Thanks for the advise Jess but if that was the case I would be extremley worried as I was not aware I had kids!!!

Anyway there does not appear to be an option available like that. I do recall it initially made a continous deep noise when trying to play that eventually cut out and nothing heard from it since.
 

D Singh
Unregistered guest
Optical cables over longer runs will tend to create what we in the home theater area call "sparklies", that is little chirps in the sound representation. Because optical cables send information as light and some high-end optical cables utilize glass in the inside to reflect the signal, over a longer distance (over 50 ft) the internal reflection and data loss becomes larger and lost data can never be restored. As a result, little sparklies can be heard through the speakers. The digital coaxial utilizes a more robust type of signal transfer over the long distances (if you don't believe me all digital cable and satellite companies use RG-6 coaxial cables to send their data). For short runs, however (for the most part 6 ft or less), both cables will have similar results, with the optical able to carry a little more bandwidth which translates into a little more sound reproduction.
 

Unregistered guest
what are the main features of the OSI? and what determines the architecture of a network?
 

Anonymous
 
http://www.ecoustics.com/cgi-bin/bbs/show.pl?tpc=5&post=452085#POST452085
http://www.ecoustics.com/cgi-bin/bbs/show.pl?tpc=5&post=452085#POST452085

If Optical cables are only for short runs then why are all of the communication cables that travel across the bottom of the ocean optical??

They dont use plastic fiber however.
 

Silver Member
Username: Eramsey

South carolina United States

Post Number: 326
Registered: Feb-05
Anon: First of all what D Signh is referring to "sparklies" is actually known as "jitter". This is identifiable as a very short "chirp" or as an audible split second loss of signal. Another benefit of a coaxial digital cable is that is has a much higher bandwith up in the gigaHertz range rather than optical which is only the full audio bandwith 20Hz-20KHz for home audio . Optical cables offer much in the same way of performance that coaxial cables do for short lengths. With longer lengths however, coaxial runs are better because they are less subject to jitter. Also since the light pulses have to be converted to an electrical signal whereas the coaxial signal is already in electrical form,this adds an extra step to the to the process for an optical signal. This can result in more timing errors which are the root cause of jitter and signal loss. Comparing the less than 1V p-p signal of an optical cable after conversion to an electrical signal to the huge bundles of fine quality optical glass runs on the ocean floor and the requisite system to power such is like comparing a jon boat to the Titanic.
 

New member
Username: Shertzerj

Post Number: 1
Registered: Oct-05
Speaking of problems with optical inputs, has anybody ever been able to fix an optical input "door" that's been broken? On my decent Onkyo receiver, I had to remove the three optical cables from the unit the other day for the first time, and when I did, two of the doors broke. Right now they're being precariously held in place in the back of the unit with electrical tape. This is a terrible design, but is there a way to fix the doors or at least give the cables better support? Thank you.
 

Dr Daniel
Unregistered guest
Hi, I have a Sanyo DVD player with Digital optical out and a Hitachi 5-1 Surround speaker kit with DD amplifier with a Digital coaxial in. Have anyone used a convertor to convert optical to coaxial and what the pro and con? Thank.
 

Installer.
Unregistered guest
the conversion rate takes time.

on some earlier posts id just like to say this.

fibre optics travels at 1 metre per second the only thing faster isnt even used for audio purposes. how ever even though fibre can be laid out for miles you have to have a signal booster every kilometer or the signal degredation will make the signal unusable. at distances of 10 - 2000 feet the human ear cant hear the difference speed makes in any type of cable. the only thing you really need to worry about is the connection points and how many times you plan on moving it. also a rule of thumb is that fibre has a minimal bend radius of 8 inches, however if you have ever installed any you know that the reality is about a 2 - 3 inch minimal bend radius. also depending on the grade of the cble jacketing it isnt that fragile....i once witnessed a 175lb man jump up and down repeatedly on 1 after i had got it caught hard core in a crack on the real (perhaps at a bend radius of .0015 inches at about 50lbs of preasure) and it didnt break and tested clean. fibre is cool and all but unless you are using it for internet connection you are wasting your money.

a 62.5 micron cable can carry multiple light streams at different wavelengths each stream capable of carrying 10,000,000 phone conversations.
 

Bronze Member
Username: D_singh

Post Number: 35
Registered: Sep-05
Installer...

Fiber optics utilizes light. Light travels exponentially faster than 1 m/s. In fact, the speed of light is aroung 300000000, or 3 X 10^8 m/s.

If you're talking conversion of signal, then you may be right, BUT, electrons in conducting material also travel MUCH faster than 1 m/s. I think typical drift velocity of an electron flowing through copper wire is 1000000 m/s, or 1 X 10^6 m/s.
 

Installer.
Unregistered guest
well mr singh you need to go tell the guys that write the manuals how fast light travels. umm oh yea light doesnt travel at a constant speed 1st off secondly the figures you have thrown out suget you are using as a medium a nonfriction vacume style layout. also you must remember that the light will not be travelling in a strait line it will be reflecting off the walls. and back to my original point light doesnt travel at a constant rate of speed it has in fact been found that some particles of light travel as fast as 35 MPH. do your homework friend thats what google is for.
 

Unregistered guest
We recenlty got Digital Cable with the converter box that has a coaxial digital out on the back. My Sony reciever has one Optical Digital and one Coaxial Digital out. I've got a Sony DVD that has one of each also. My DVD manual shows me connecting both optical and coaxial outs to the back of the reciever not leaving me room for my cable converter box. My question is do I need both lines coming from the back of the DVD to the reciever or can I use just the optical and get the same sound quality? Or do I need both connections to properly decode? If I need both, then can I run a splitter on the recievers Coaxial Digital out and connect both the cable box coaxial digital out and the DVD player coaxial digital out? Thank you for you help. This is all too confusing for a novice!
 

Unregistered guest
Hi! I have creative audigy 2 Nx, and Speakers: Creative inspire 7.1 TD 7700 (with decoder) with optical connection. Could anybody please tell me why Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Ex doesn't work ?????
 

Delcret
Unregistered guest
Which would be better - a 3 foot or a 6 foot digital coax cable. (the connection distance is only going to be 3ft)
 

Silver Member
Username: Diverhank

Huntington Beach, CA

Post Number: 108
Registered: Sep-05
Delcret Quote:"Which would be better - a 3 foot or a 6 foot digital coax cable. (the connection distance is only going to be 3ft)"

Shorter is always better, both for the pocket book and for the signals.
 

not an installer
Unregistered guest
Installer: Light speed does vary, but for these types of conversations 3x10^8 m/s is close enough. It will slow down depending on the desity and composition of the air inside the cable, and the distance travelled by the light particles will be greater than the length of the cable because of the reflections. It will never be anything close to as slow as 35 miles per hour.

At that speed it'd be faster to drive a letter across the country than make a phone call.
 

loser22
Unregistered guest
All the comments here seem to point to coax being better or at least as good as optical for everyday home use, which makes me wonder why so many manufacturers are fitting their equipment with optical connections? I would expect it to be more expensive to produce than coax, so why do they bother with it?
 

Ricky M
Unregistered guest
I have a Denon DMC 380 CD player and now I need a good receiver/amp. I would like a receiver that: 1. Supports SACD so that I can take full advantage of the CD player's HDCD sound output. 2. Has at least one coaxial input so I can connect the CD player thru a coaxial digital cable instead of the standard red/white RCA cables. If I only use a coaxial cable how does the receiver know that sound is coming for the player? Do I need to connect the standard RCA cables as well? Yes, I'm a newbie :P
3. Has a built-in headphone amp.

Any suggestions on which receiver I should buy?
Ricky M
 

Troysea
Unregistered guest
I hope this wasnt answered elsewhere but, Our older DVD player just died. We are looking for a new one. Our reciever/DTS?Dolby processor has both opyical and digital coaxial inputs.

What input is better to use performance wise? We have seen dvd players with just the digital coaxial but very few with both.

We will us ethe dvd player for both movies ( in DTS and Dolby ) as well as CD's ( some with DTS )

Thanks!

troy

 

Gold Member
Username: Samijubal

Post Number: 2170
Registered: Jul-04
My player has both, I can't tell any difference between the two. Either way, it's just 0s and 1s.
 

New member
Username: Arie01

Post Number: 1
Registered: Mar-06
Hello, I'm new to this forum and I'm not so sure I wrote my question/problem at the right place. Oh well, here it is:

I have a home theatre amplifire with two digital inputs, one coax and one optical. I have three devices that I'd like to connect to this amplifire. I have a digital cable receiver and a DVD player that I can connect with either coax or optical cable and I have my computer that I can only connect with the coax.

Does any one know if there is a coax SPDIF splitter in the market? Is it possible to provide links?


Thank you,
 

New member
Username: Tillyvick14

Post Number: 1
Registered: Apr-06
Hello I have a Pioneer HTD-530 DV home theater system with one coaxial digital audio input. I just purchased a new TV with only an optical digital audio output. Can I hook the two together using a coaxial digital cable or will this not work at all? Thank you very much for any help you might be able to provide.
 

New member
Username: Computerguru

Post Number: 1
Registered: Apr-06
Dear michael,

You can purchess a fiberoptic to coax converter from radio shack, this will solve your problem and keep you digital.



 

New member
Username: Tillyvick14

Post Number: 2
Registered: Apr-06
Thanks very much Jordan!
 

New member
Username: Boyce

Post Number: 8
Registered: Apr-06
Arie

here is the splitter. http://www.rdlnet.com/product.php?page=46 ,but I belive you need a selector not splitter, http://www.rdlnet.com/product.php?page=47
 

New member
Username: Tillyvick14

Post Number: 3
Registered: Apr-06
I've purchased the fiberoptic to coax converter from radio shack and the appropriate cables and have everything hooked up. The dolby digital signal seems to fade in and out at times on my receiver however. Is there some other trick to using a converter like this? After tinkering around with the position of the converter and cables I got a pretty solid signal last night. I'm using a Samsung TV with built in HD Tuner and sending that dolby digital sound out to my receiver using the fiberoptic to digital coax converter.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Boyce

Post Number: 27
Registered: Apr-06
I guess is the converter, I use this one for our studio, it pretty good. http://www.zzounds.com/item--THKMIMC0
 

New member
Username: Gadgit7

Post Number: 1
Registered: May-06
OK stupid question time. I have :-
Marantz DV6400 SACD DVDA player
Denon AVR 2805
Panasonic vid player
Austar Box
68cm CRT TV.

I need the tv to work independently and/or with the DVD and/or video player.
Also need to be able to use the AV receiver when I want for movies and SACD playing.
Do I get a coaxial interconnect and keep the 5.1 outputs just for SACD or wil the coax do the same thing?
How the hell do I connect everything without getting interference fromDVD tovideo to TV.
Oh yeah there is Austar to use aswell.

Hope that makes sense, thx

Gary

PS. Power use is a concern as I am on solar with generator back up so cannot have the AV receiver running all the time :-(
 

New member
Username: Tillyvick14

Post Number: 4
Registered: Apr-06
Thanks Boyce I may have to get a different converter. It's very strange if I move the converter I have hooked up now around I can sometimes get a signal but only briefly. Could I have a bad Toslink output also? Hopefully this can be solved with a better converter.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Boyce

Post Number: 42
Registered: Apr-06
Gary what TV you have?
 

New member
Username: Gadgit7

Post Number: 2
Registered: May-06
HI Boyce,

TV is 68cm CRT tv made by TCL (China) great picture though. It has S Video x2 normal av inputs and facility for component in (3 colour cables). No coax or optic inputs. Thx

Gary
 

Bronze Member
Username: Boyce

Post Number: 55
Registered: Apr-06
Hook up the DVD component out(red,blue,green RCA) to TV component in, DVD audio out (red & white RCA) to TV AV input, DVD coax or optic to Denon.
I hope your VCR has 2 set AV output, if yes, one go to TV, one go to Denon. If no, pray god your tv has audio out, if it does, hook the VCR audio to TV, from tv audio out hook to the Denon TV in (red and white RCA), for Austar Box I don't know how is it work, so guess as a cable box,if you still has AV input left from the TV, hook the Austar box Svideo and audio cable to TV, and coax to Denon, or plan B, hook Austar video audio(yellow red white RCA) to VCR video audio in, hook Austar coax to Denon.
 

New member
Username: Gadgit7

Post Number: 3
Registered: May-06
Thx Boyce, i'll give that a go as soon as the new coax cables arrive. Austar is Australian satellite TV and your solution can be done as you say. Be nice to neaten up all the spaghetti bhind the players etc. Just unsure if I have to have 5.1 analogue out from DVD to Denon to make sacd work properly? Thx again, much appreciated :-)

Gary
 

New member
Username: Invisiblelim

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-06
I wish to ask, if output from PC's Sound Card, Digital Coaxial connection better or Fibre Optic Digital Better? I'm planning to buy a monster digital cable, but before that i wish to compare the difference first.
For your information:-
My Soundcard is Creative X-Fi Elite Pro, connect to Logitech Z5500 5.1 THX Speaker System. Thank you for any pros out there for answering my question.
 

New member
Username: Benlee6200

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-06
Hi all,

I've noticed that when I play some cds, there is sometimes a click sound between songs (on cds with short gaps between songs) and a pop after the cd has finished.

I have a optical digital connection and the clicks do not occur when I switch to regular RCA connections.

Is this what a few of you referred to as a 'jitter' from the optical cable?

If so, could this be remedied by buying a coaxial digital cable ??
 

New member
Username: Benlee6200

Post Number: 2
Registered: Dec-06
By the way, the cds are played on Yamaha DVD-S657 through a Denon AVR-2106 amplifier
 

New member
Username: Andrew_lb

Post Number: 1
Registered: Sep-07
[quote]I wish to ask, if output from PC's Sound Card, Digital Coaxial connection better or Fibre Optic Digital Better? I'm planning to buy a monster digital cable, but before that i wish to compare the difference first. [/quote]

I also own an X-Fi sound card and I use a digital coaxial cable to run the audio to my receiver. I personally wouldn't buy any products made by Monster because they're definitely overrated for how much they cost. All of my interconnects are made by a company called Outlaw Audio and are purchased online. Also, i recommend that you don't spend too much money on the cable considering audio output from any sound card no matter how high end is going to encounter interference from all the computers other components, especially the video card.
 

New member
Username: Flcaptain

Palm Harbor, FL United States

Post Number: 1
Registered: Sep-07
Just got a Toshiba MW30G71 TV/DVD/VCR combo unit and the only audio outputs are Digital- a fiber and a coax. I have a set of wireless headphones (analog) that I want to connect to the TV. Any inexpensive way of doing it?
Tks
 

New member
Username: Memike

Post Number: 1
Registered: Oct-08
have a yamaha rxv 795 it is 10 years old .it has 3 optical inputs and 1 digital coaxail conections so i have no problem can put a dvd ,cd and sat tv
 

New member
Username: Sonyastark

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-10
Hello Boys,
I am a confused blond female that is pretty sure given some of the questions and answeres that have been covered. that my knight in shining armor will be able to save me. I want to watch outdoor movies with my kids. I have purchased a Epson Moviemate 60 and since the built in sound is so sad.... i also purchased the Earthshaker Pa system to use as my speaker from Frontgate. Both work great...just not together and thus my question. Im about to fling both out the window. The Pa system has an AUX in, REC out. All four red/white. My projector has a coaxial cable out(orange), and then audio left and right. Also red/white. i have tried the most obvious....no sound..... then all else ...nothing...nada.
i usually can figure things out but im stumped AND everyone at Frontgate are completely clueless. Dear God, Will someone be my hero?
 

New member
Username: Drdanny

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-10
I'm assuming you've tried connecting red-red and white-white? Not familiar with the equipment you've got but are the red/white connectors on the moviemate for audio IN? (would assume this to be the case if there is only one set of red/white connectors) If so the only audio output on the projector is a digital coaxial. Also if you've got 2 reds and 2 whites on the Earthshaker it doesnt sound like there's a digital input so the ports you've mentioned can't be connected together that way unless you buy some kind of digital-analog converter.
There is a simpler method though if the moviemate has a headphone socket - in which case all you would need to connect the two together would be a jack->2phono Y-cable with one end plugged into the moviemate's headphone socket and the two phono plugs plugged into the AUX in on the PA
 

New member
Username: Leinad1

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-10
Jason, I have the exact setup you do, the Creative X-Fi Elite Pro, and Logitech Z5500 5.1 Surround sound speakers, and right now I have my cable box and blu-ray player running optical (tos-link) out into a 3-to-1 switch, obviously a 2-to-1 would've been sufficient. But then I have "optical in" to my desktop console on the Elite Pro and it sounds great, and unlike Andrew stated, I hear no interference what-so-ever, none noticable to me anyway. And if everything is hooked up correctly, you shouldn't have much, if any interference when using a discrete sound card compared to onboard sound, which has to be processed and ran through the motherboard before going out to the speakers, therefore picking up more interference. Before I had the switch box though, I had my cable box connected to Digital Coax, and my blu-ray connected to optical, which was a pain because when you have both plugged into the Elite Pro Console, the digital coax overrides the optical, so when ever I wanted to use my blu-ray player I had to unplug the digital coax cable. However, in the future I am going to change from optical to coax, not because of sound quality, but because of durability.
 

New member
Username: Sivamsrk

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-13
hello friends,

I recently brought LG 3D LED Full HD TV. but it has optical out only. I have one old Philips Home theater with coaxial inputs. how can i connect my TV to the home theater. please help me.
 

New member
Username: Fiberopticom

ShenZhen,GuangDond, GuangDong China

Post Number: 1
Registered: Sep-13
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