Google Fiber Expanding to Grandview, Mo.

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Google is on a roll with the expansion of its super-fast Google Fiber service. The Web giant on Tuesday announced that gigabit Internet is headed to another Kansas City suburb — Grandview, Mo.

The Grandview Board of Aldermen last night voted unanimously to bring Google Fiber to their community, Google’s Rachel Hack wrote in a blog post. Grandview will join the likes of Austin, Texas; Provo, Utah; and Shawnee, Kan., all of which are getting access to Google Fiber as well.

Google does not have a firm date for when it will start rolling out Google Fiber in Grandview, which is located directly south of Kansas City, Mo. and has about 24,475 residents. “It will still be awhile before we can build Fiber in Grandview — we need to plan and engineer our network there first,” Hack wrote.

Google will build the Grandview Google Fiber network based on demand, meaning pre-determined “fiberhoods” will get service once pre-registration goals are met, Mayor Steve Dennis said in a statement. He added that the network should help the local economy by creating new jobs and expanding businesses.

“We are delighted to partner with Google to bring this cutting edge fiber-optic system to the Grandview community,” Dennis said. “We’re thrilled to be able to provide this unique innovation opportunity for our citizens, school district, and home-based businesses.”

Google Fiber is already available in fiberhoods throughout Kansas City, and will also be coming to the nearby city of Olathe, Kansas.

The announcement comes shortly after the city councils in Shawnee, Kan. and Provo, Utah also voted to approve Google Fiber. In Provo, Google will be purchasing and upgrading the existing, city-built iProvo fiber network, which has struggled financially in recent years. The search giant hopes to have Google Fiber up and running in Provo by year’s end.

Google Fiber will also come to Austin, Texas in 2014.

Google says its Fiber service offers access to Internet speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second, which is 100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today.

For more on gigabit Internet availability throughout the U.S., see the slideshow above.

By Angela Moscaritolo, PCMag


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