Archive through April 03, 2007

 

mills014
Unregistered guest
I plan to split my cable 3 times: 1 cable to a CRT TV, 1 cable to an HD digital cable box and then to the HDTV, and the other directly to the HDTV for the sake of getting PIP. I saw the following 3-way Monster splitter (link to monster cable's description of the splitter:

3-way Monster cable Low-loss splitter

(Monster Cable TGHZ-3RF 3-Way Low-Loss RF Splitter for TV and Satellite, 2 GHz)


It's 5 MgHz-2GHz bandwidth. I don't really know what these #'s mean though. Can you explain in laymen's terms? Assume I know nothing. What makes a splitter good (i.e. what should I look for when I buy a splitter for multiple TVs)? I don't want to lose signal.

On a related note, my current 2-way spltter from Comcast is 5MgHZ-1000MgHz. I bought a GE 3-way splitter at Circuit City that is 5Mghz-900 Mghz. I'm assuming this is worse so I will return it and probably get the Monster splitter listed above. Can I expect to see a benefit from teh additional $10 it costs?

Lastly, if I buy a 4-way splitter and only use 3 outputs, does the signal still get divided by 4 or will it get divided by 3? A 4-way splitter would provided added flexibility in case I wnated to add another TV down the road, but wouldn't be used right now. I don't want to do it if it weakens the signal though.
 

formerly xvxvxvx
Unregistered guest
Using a splitter is like eating french fries at a bowling alley. You may purchase a full order but by the time the fries are gone you ate about half and your bowling buddies split up the rest.

The first tap off a splitter reduces the signal by 3.5 db or a little more than half. The 2nd tap is less half of the first, that is now less than 1/5 of the original signal. The third tap loses 10.5 db or about 1/12th of the original signal.

There is no free lunch so you need a pretty strong signal to use a three way splitter. The 5Mghz to 900Mhz splitter is fine for splitting RF from a cable signal. Your only problem is signal strength which can be cured by a preamp placed as close to where your cable enters the house as possible.


For about the price of that Monster 4 way splitter you can purchase a 4 output two way amplifier which is what I recommend.

PS: All the db levels above are precise, the percentages of loss on each leg are estimated but the message should be clear even without exact accuracy.

xvxvxvx
 

mills014
Unregistered guest
Thanks. So how do I determine if my signal strength is sufficient or not. I've split it 2 ways forever without any problem. With this additional information, would you still expect a 3-way splitter to have poor picture quality? How do I know if it's the signal or the cables or what?
 

Bronze Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 21
Registered: Mar-05
call your cable company and have them check it
 

Linda Allan
Unregistered guest
Hi, I just found this thread in looking for the same answer as the above. I just bought an HDTV and I now have two regular tv's in the kids' rooms. I had only a regular splitter before and now I need a three way. My question is, I did not really understand the answer about how signal is reduced. Using made up numbers, does it go like this- start at 50db, then each leg has only 1/3 db minus the 5.7 db (from Monster site)so each tv gets almost 11db? If not right, could you use numbers in an example? My kids and I thank you for any help. My husband is stationed oversees and I'm not sure if he would know anyways. Thank you
 

Ryuhei
Unregistered guest
I believe your confusion is about the signal strength being cut in half by a splitter. Like above poster mentioned, the first split reduces the signal by 3.5 db or a little more than half. A reduction of 3 db means the signal is cut in half so 3.5 is a little more than half. If you split off this another 3.5 db is lost which again is more than half of the remaining signal. This would mean your signal at this point is less than 1/4th the original signal. It might be easier to think of a 2 way splitter in terms of a water hose. Put a splitter on a hose and you cut the strength in half. Another splitter would cut this half in half. At some point an amp is needed or there just won't be enough strenght left. In closing, to help you out the easiest way, buy a 3-way splitter where one leg only loses 3.5 db and the other two lose 7db. Hook your HDTV to the 3.5 leg and the childrens to the 7 legs. If the picture is acceptable you are done. If not, I'm afraid some sort of amplification will be necessary. Let us know how it goes.
 

Unregistered guest
The information you have provided is nearly understanable to the more moronic reader (of which I number at least 3!!.) However, you did not answer one of the original questions:
"Lastly, if I buy a 4-way splitter and only use 3 outputs, does the signal still get divided by 4 or will it get divided by 3? A 4-way splitter would provided added flexibility in case I wnated to add another TV down the road, but wouldn't be used right now. I don't want to do it if it weakens the signal though"
my problem is that I have a cable coming in and there is a 2 way splitter but one output is not used. Would it help to remove the splitter and somehow splice the cable
Thanks for your help
 

Ryuhei
Unregistered guest
"my problem is that I have a cable coming in and there is a 2 way splitter but one output is not used. Would it help to remove the splitter and somehow splice the cable"
Even if one of the outputs is not used, the signal is still cut in half (actually a little bit more than half). Easy solution is an inexpensive coax union available at Rat Shack. In your case though, a single splitter usually does not affect the quality of the picture. In the case of the person using a 4-way, it is definately better to use a 3-way if a 4th split is not needed.
 

Unregistered guest
In our complex, they have used thin coaxial cables for wiring RF signal.
Comparing with 75 ohm cables, their diameter is almost half.
How can I now it's characteristic without measuring?
How can I match these cables with 75 ohm cables?
The reason why i ask this question is that we can change some cables and not all.
We need to match impedance between two cable in joint.
 

Unregistered guest
I need to split 1 incoming cable signal 7 times. I have 4 regular tv's, 1 HDTV, 1 cable modem and 1 to my tv card on the computer. I saw an 8-way amplified ,splitter at this site http://www.hometech.com/video/amp.html#CV-CVT28PIA, cost about $120.00. Do you think this will do the trick?
 

Anonymous
 
Channel Vision amps are known to be of good quality. Only thing I would do different is your cable modem hook up. Use a tap from the main line directly to modem. Then, after the tap, split your signal 6 ways with a splitter. Usually modems have trouble with their return signal if they go through multi port splitters.
 

New member
Username: Slewpy

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-05
I really like the 3x8 powered splitter by OnQ. As the previous poster said I split the incoming coax with a two way first - One lead to the modem and the second to the cable input on the 3x8. Then the remaining 8 leads on the splitter go off to the televisions. This will leave you with 2 open ports on the splitter if you wish to add some modulation to your system(ie a central dvd to view on a specific channel on all of your tvs.) Many more uses as well.
 

Anonymous
 
As a point of reference, I have a three-way splitter (free from cableco) as soon as the cable enters my house.
I have one run of that split going to the front of my house, and split into two. I have one run of that split going to my HTPC being split into two separate tuners in my PC. Both additional splitters are $3 drugstore splitters.
All coax is Home Depot bulk, terminated myself by cheap screw-on F connectors.

Signal strength is consistantly 95-100% on all digital and HD channels.

Don't spend the money on fancy amplifiers. First check to see if the $3 drugstore splitter will do the trick.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 567
Registered: Mar-05
anonymous~ although you may have found that the cheap $3 drugstore splitter and the bulk Home Depot coax with cheap screw on connectors is working, I'm pretty sure if there is any type of signal leakage program by your cable providers they will detect the "cheap" components by any signal leakage. Don't take this as a trash on what you did, it is not my intention, I'm just making sure that people know both sides of the story. I never complain about customers that take it upon themselves to do their own wiring. I only point out why they shouldn't have done it "this way", or could have done it better "that way". There is a reason cable companies use crimp or compression connectors in their systems and not the screw on cheap ones.
 

Anonymous
 
cableguy,
I'm a little confused by what you wrote.

How will the cableco detect a 'signal leakage' in my house?
Why would I care anyway?

I'm not going to argue that what I have is of higher quality than compression fittings, but I was not about to spend $100 on the tools to create them.

I was simply offering a low-cost option, especially considering that I can't see a difference between the two anyway.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 571
Registered: Mar-05
Anonymous, all cable providers in the U.S. are required to monitor signal leakage due to FCC requirments. Why would you care? because if your house has a significant leak, they cable company has the right to shut your cable signal off until they can get in your home and correct the problem. Don't get me wrong, I'm not slamming on you, like I said, in fact more power to you. I'm just making sure you understand that improperly done connections can cause problems in the system. If your cable company is agressive in tracking cable signal leakages like the one I work for, you may get a nice note from them saying they need to get in to find out why there is a leak at your house. If they can't get in, they shut you off until they can get in. The way they detect the leaks is by putting an audio warble at a frequency on the cable that can be detected by a leakage detector, it's not detectable unless you have a leakage detector that is set up on the frequency they are broadcasting. As for the $ amount, a good set of crimpers run about $20-30...but I'm not going to argue semantics at this point either...like I said, I think it's neat when people do things themselves, no problems with that at all, just making you aware that problems can be created when not done properly. No ill will.

regards,
 

John Denkman
Unregistered guest
Need your expertise on splitting with a tap cableguy,
My son replaced the splitters in my house which improved the signals except for my last tv. I also have a cable modem at the first split. He says my modem has too much signal and the last tv has too little which can easily be fixed with a #9 tap to my modem. I went to all the stores to find this tap but all they had were regular splitters. The guy at Radio Shack said they were easy to find on the internet. Could you post a link to a #9 tap to buy since I am clueless as to which one works with a modem? Thank you for any assistance.
 

New member
Username: Mrcmt26

Staten island, Ny

Post Number: 6
Registered: Dec-05
cable guy the problem i was having with the toshiba was that she was complaining about missing channels. some times she would get all of the channels she subscribed to the she would only get anolog channels. ny1 and then skip to tbs which are our anolog channels,then everything would come back. I also did that pioneer with the seperate unit for the cable card,but it is not working still. I did the install last week. I'm going back tommorrow for a service call. When i get the model # i'll give you a post.
 

New member
Username: Mrcmt26

Staten island, Ny

Post Number: 7
Registered: Dec-05
John, you could use a dc-8 or 9 coupler depending on the signal on the foward and return going to the modem. i suggest you make a service call with your local cable company to come and check your house.
 

New member
Username: Mrcmt26

Staten island, Ny

Post Number: 8
Registered: Dec-05
Cable guy, I know your a legend on this website so dont think i'm stepping on your toes or any thing. This is just a great website for consumers and technicians to get some information. Also looks like you could use some help with some of overload of questions you get.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 573
Registered: Mar-05
bill~ thanks :-), the problem you are describing with Toshiba is best handled by Toshiba. There is a software update available, but from what I hear about it, there are a few more bugs to work out. Have them ask for a guy named Paul when they call customer service, he's pretty reliable with his knowledge of cc's.

John~ go to eBay, search for a Regal DC-9 directional coupler for coax cable...there is somebody on the site selling them for $5.49 and free shipping.

bill ~part II~ I don't think I'm a legend on this website, please don't elevate me to that lofty status as I don't like getting shot down lol. I help when I can, and learn when I can't, so I can help the next time. There are some good people on this site that have helped me along the path... btw fx, if you're out there...Happy New Year bud
It's nice to see another cable tech, as it's always good to share knowledge with other cable workers...one thing our industry lacks is good knowledge of this high end equipment. take care and see ya round the postings.
 

New member
Username: Mrcmt26

Staten island, Ny

Post Number: 9
Registered: Dec-05
we called toshiba and they said the new software for the tv is available on the 16th of this month. the tv has 1.1.2 and the new one he said was 1.1.28. but its been 3 days and the customer did not call back yet. thanks
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 575
Registered: Mar-05
sweet! keep me posted I've got a few people here that need to get updated as well.
 

Anonymous
 
Hi does anyone have an idea about splitting a satellite signal to 3 tv's total. I went into Radio Shack and they sold me a splitter with four outs and one in from satellite. I have connected all tvs, the first has great reception, the second and third nothing. I was wondering if I need a booster of some kind. Any ideas. Thanks
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 595
Registered: Mar-05
You might consider taking this thread over to the satellite section of the site.
 

ukannie anonymous!
Unregistered guest
Cableguy, thanks for replying. How exactly do I do that. I am a single female. But quite knowledgable and usually able to do things without the assistance of anybody else. Thanks
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 598
Registered: Mar-05
ukannie~ if you're asking how do you go over to the satellite thread and post this question just click this link and ask your question in there the same way you did in here.

http://www.ecoustics.com/electronics/forum/home-video/35.html

 

John Denkman
Unregistered guest
Many thanks for your help cableguy. The 9 tap arrived from ebay and now everything works great. Thank you
 

jdtv
Unregistered guest
What is the result of an overamplified Signal? I currently have a 3-way splitter and a signal amplifer. I am interested in powering an HDTV, 2 LoDTV and a Cable Modem... Any suggestions on sequencing?
 

JohnA2006
Unregistered guest
Cableguy, ive been reading your posts and find that you may be the guy to help with some of my problems
1. I have 7 tv's in my home, when i purchased the house it was new construction and came with a verizon ready hub box. Lately the meter by the adjustment keeps changing from the setting that i adjust it to
2. I have digital cable with a HD dvr box in the family room and a HD box on another set, the rest of the house has basic cable. My Picture on the family room tv keeps distorting or tiling. Its a HD crt tube tv, it was perfect then needed a circuit board. Ever since then things are going on. The tv guy says its the cable signal that was changed to digital, The cable guy says its not the cable. I keep thinking its the verizon box.
3. recently my cable internet keep going down. the modem is hooked after the verizon box, so im going to change that and split it from the main cable, 1 to the modem and 1 to the verizon box. http://www.verizoncsi.com/pdfs/d_series_users_guide.pdf#search='verizon%20ready%20hub'

How do you feel about those verizon box's and would it be better to invest in the channel vision splitter and what splitter should i use to split the main coming in to modem and to verizon box. Keep in mind im not to savvy on splitters, like a 9 tap, not sure what that means. Thank you
 

sallyjones
Unregistered guest
if i have one cable box that is under a subscrition at another house (A). can that box be use at another house (B), which would be connected to a single split line which already has one cable box that is serviced with every channel (premium channels, on demand). Is this illegal and can the cable company detect that this box is taking signal from House (B) which it is not subscribed to.
 

New member
Username: Tech7470

Staten island, Ny

Post Number: 10
Registered: Jan-06
if it is a digital box most likely the cable company can see the box. If the box is in the same area like around the corner or next door you should not have a problem depending on the system. If you are in new york i can give you a better answer. you should be more specific. like what kind of box it is and how far are you going with the box.
 

Unregistered guest
Hi. I just signed up for cable TV, VOIP phone, and broadband internet thru the same cable provider. I'm switching over from DISH TV and dial up internet, so I can get broadband internet. My home, built in 1962, is not wired for cable. I need advice on how to wire it before the cable guy comes on March 17.

I have 3 home computers hooked up by wireless g. So I'll hook up my first floor office computer to the cable modem, and let the other computers use the cable modem to access the internet thru my wireless g network.

I have a main TV room on the first floor where I'll hook up my cable DVR provided by the cable company. I have TVs with built in tuners in a second room on the first floor, 1 in the basement, and 4 in the second floor bedrooms (7 TVs total).

Finally, I'm subsribing to VOIP telephone service thru this same cable provider. My phone jacks are already wired with standard telephone wire.

I'd appreciate your advice on what cable wire to use, splitters, amps, wall plate covers, etc., so that I can wire the home with my brothers' help before March 17. From what I've read on your site, it seems like I should go with RG6 solid copper wire throughout the home. I'd appreciate a layout that I can follow.

I plan on using standard length wires with factory installed ends (25', 50' etc.), and not do any crimping myself. If I only need 20' of a 25' cable, so that 5' sits coiled up in the attic, will that degrade my signal? Would it be better to cut to exact needed lengths and crimp on ends?

The basement ceiling and attic above the second floor bedrooms are open, and that's where I plan on making my connections and splits. I'm drywalling the basement ceiling this spring to finish my basement, so my basement cabling will no longer be accessable. That's why I need to do all my cable work now, even if I don't use all 7 TV outlets.

I'd appreciate any advice you can give. Thanks. Michael
 

New member
Username: Lmdamuth

Post Number: 1
Registered: Mar-06
I have been having intermittent problems with my cable for years. The cable techs have been here a dozen times. Each guy has a different suggestion as to what the problem is. I have:
rewired the house completely with RG6 Quad Shield Cable
replaced all of the splitters
all connections are Thomas and Betts Snap-n-seal.
I have a cable company supplied amplifier at the point that the cable enters the house. From that there is a 2 way splitter at 3.5 dB each then to a second 3 way splitter, one @ 3.5 db goint to my cable modem and two 7 dB going to televisions. All of the tv's work, but the cable modem craps out every day at around noon then comes back on at around 7:00 pm.

Any suggestions?
 

New member
Username: Rf_tech

Post Number: 1
Registered: Mar-06
To: Mike D
I have more Questions about your set up.
Ask the cable techs that come out to your house
when the last maintenance sweep was done for your cable node.
If everything has been changed at your house(The drop from the tap to your house
ground block, and all your outlets) Then the Maintenance Dept. of the cable company should be able to trouble shoot where the problem is located. If you are having the problem talk to your neighbors to the left and the right up to five houses down on each side because they should be having the same issue. Sound like the feeder cable going down the street.
Ask To have the presence of the are supervisor
at the next service call
 

New member
Username: Lmdamuth

Post Number: 2
Registered: Mar-06
Thanks for the suggestion. The cable company is coming out today (SUNDAY BELIEVE IT OR NOT). I have requested that a supervisor accompany the tech. I don't know if that will happen, but I requested it.

I failed to mention a couple of things:
1. The cable company has tested all of my internal wiring for signal leak. They have not shared any results, other than to say that everything looks good inside.
2. They replaced the feed line coming from the pole to the house last December.
3. The last time the cable company came out, they recommended that I replace my cable modem with a new Motorola SB5120, which I did.

I think that is all, but I'll let you know if I think of anything else.

Your recommendation about the maintenance sweep makes a lot of sense. I'll ask the tech to do that when he comes in today. (My suspicion is that the problem is at the node.)

Thanks again for your feedback.
 

New member
Username: Lmdamuth

Post Number: 3
Registered: Mar-06
The lead tech came out from the cable company. He checked each connection including wiring to vcr's etc. I had overlooked a couple of things that he found and corrected including some manufacturer supplied rg59u leads that had the old style antenna leads attached. He also found some other minor signal leaks at one of the splitters. Also, one of the connections to a analog cable box was getting some noise, so he installed a noise filter. This seems to have cleared up some interference issues on ch's 6, 10 and 12.

I guess we will have to wait and see if the modem issue reoccurs.

Any suggestions for a next step if this doesn't solve the problem?

Thanks again for your help.

ps, I mentioned the maintenance sweep. He said that is a big deal to get done, and is a last resort.
 

New member
Username: Rf_tech

Post Number: 5
Registered: Mar-06
To Mike D.
My next suggestion is for a Maintenance tech to take a look at the problem in the street, from tap to tap.
How much time have you lost in trying to get this problem fixed. Time is still Money;right?

What is the agreement for service with your provider? Somewhere they spelled out what service they will provide for your money each month.
 

New member
Username: Sjshandyman

Reisterstown, Maryland USA

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-06
OK, I am new here, and a little confused. We just had the cable company here to add another box. I have a single line entering my house that I had split to six individual lines each at -11dB. The cable guy disconnected from the 6 way to a 3 way (each out-put says 7dB). One of those goes to another splitter that has each out-put marked as -5dB. My question is, am I supposed to have a better signal with his set up, or should I re-wire back to my original 6-way -11dB splitter? (Is -11dB stronger out-put than -7 or -5dB?)
Thanks for reading! Steve Smith
 

Silver Member
Username: Formerly_fx

Dallas, Tx

Post Number: 124
Registered: Mar-06
It is not relevant. What is relevant is if you are currently satisfied with the picture quality from all the legs. Are you? If so leave well enough alone.

If you must know for every 3db the signal is reduced by 50% so you can compute the difference yourself. You nust also consider that a signal splitter is not 100% efficient so if you have a two way splitter each leg will be -3.5db instead of -3db each due to the inefficiency of the conversion.

xvxvxvx
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 774
Registered: Mar-05
"(Is -11dB stronger out-put than -7 or -5dB?)
"

-7+-5= -12. 1 dB of signal loss is exactly what xvxvxvx said "not relevant". If 1 dB is making things worse, there's other issues and the splitters aren't a factor. Is the picture better or worse then before? If it's no different...don't worry about it. If I had a customer who had 6 outlets connected, and only 2 of them had STB's, I would split the signal the exact same way, using the first 3 way to feed the 2 STB's, and the remaining leg to feed the downstream splitter for all the other TV's that don't have a STB. It's not often I do it that way, but options are nice when a customer doen't want to pay for an amplifier, there are other ways to get better quality if the tech knows how to use the space between his/her ears
 

New member
Username: Sjshandyman

Reisterstown, Maryland USA

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jun-06
Sorry about not posting quicker, had glitch with server...Cableguy - The picture appears ok on lower channels, but worse-pixelated or not even there on digital box- on upper channels. I think I will attempt to re-connect to 6-way splitter to test the picture quality. If that does not work, I will have to call Comcast or even look at amplifiers.
 

New member
Username: Underdog2001

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
sorry i am new to the site, but i am wanting to split my cable 3 times, once for my modem and two tvs suggestions on what to get, and what if i wanted to add another tv
 

New member
Username: Mkla

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
There was a post a while back about symptoms of an overamplified signal but looks like it never got a reponse. I'm just wondering if there are "dangers" of overamplifying. I have an 8-way amplified splitter that was installed in our new home, but when I use it, the TV signals are aweful (it looks like a cheap amplifier - generic appearing - they've replaced it once and no diff). So I'm currently just using a 3-way splitter (-3.5 to HDTV, -7 to cable modem and other TV) and bypassing the amp. This provides better signal than using the supplied amp but still not a great picture. Also, I'd like to add more TVs in the future. So I'd like to purchase an amp, but they seem to vary in dB - some up to 30 dB. Is there a risk of overamplifying the signal and damaging the tvs (HDTV or regular def)? Also, any rec's on a good amp. Thanks
 

New member
Username: Davidf

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
Help. I just bought a house with a lot of splitters. My cable tv looks fine but the cable modem won't stay online (I've tried a new modem -same problem). I suspect there are too many splits to the modem (1-2way, 1-3way,1-2way). Would a amplifier work - has anyone had success with amplifiers and cable modem?
 

New member
Username: Mkla

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-06
David - make sure the line to your modem comes off the first split. I think that will fix your problem.
 

New member
Username: Davidf

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-06
Thanks - I'll give that a try. However, doesn't each split affect the signal quality of all previous splits?
It was my understanding that each split affects the overall quality of all lines - true?
 

New member
Username: Mkla

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jul-06
Not exactly. Signal will only degrade downstream (or beyond) the split, not upstream (in the same way that an amplifier will only amplify signal downtream from the the amplifier, not upstream). Because your modem is probably the most sensitive piece of equipment you have (with respect to signal degredation), that should be the first off the split. Next should be an HDTV or Digital Cable box or DVR, if applicable. The last splits then go to your standard cable sets since they are the least sensitive. If your cable picture is fine (even after all of those splits) you probably don't need to waste money on an amp.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Wanabtech

Post Number: 42
Registered: Apr-06
Splitters do affect your return. Hence the very reason to have the modem off of the first split.
 

New member
Username: Mkla

Post Number: 4
Registered: Jul-06
Thanks for clarifying. I was actually just thinking in terms of the direction of the signal in relation to the splitter (upstream / downstream) - so signal coming to the modem will be affected as it goes through subsequent splits (downstream of the splits) and signal from the modem back to the cable company will be degraded by subsequent splits -- again "downstream" from the splits, but this time travelling in the opposite direction. Sorry if I didn't clarify that earlier. I believe David's question (If I understood it correctly) was whether splits beyond the point where modem splits will affect that particular split, and it will not -- if a signal doesn't travel through a splitter (whether it's going to or from the cable source), it shouldn't be affected. But you are correct, it's likely the degraded signal going from the modem that's likely causing his internet to drop.
 

New member
Username: Davidf

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jul-06
Thanks all. I guess I know what I'll be doing this weekend. I was hoping to avoid crawling around in the attic running another line. The price you have to pay for broadband.
Thanks again - I'll give an update when it's done.
 

New member
Username: Mmichaud4

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
OK...here we go. I have digital cable in my house along with High speed cable. All from the same company. Recently I have noticed a degradation in my Digital Cable. More specifically funny looking pics, certain stations that will not load, and On demand service that will not fully load. The tech support said they would have to send a tech out at a cost. I have one line coming into my house going into a 1 to 6 splitter the Digital Cable is hooked into one of those connections. I have no problems with the High speed internet and it is coming off of another splitter which is in line after the original split. Before I have the tech guy come out should I buy a 1 to four amplifier and run my Digital cable off of one, the Cable modem off of the other and then run the rest of the house (regular cable) of of the 1 to six splitter which is connected from the 1 to 4 amp? Whew!!!
 

Silver Member
Username: Formerly_fx

Dallas, Tx

Post Number: 144
Registered: Mar-06
You should first run a direst cable to the display that is having troubles and see if it is working. If all your displays are working improperly and you haven't made any recent changes I would be surprised.


xvxvxvx
 

New member
Username: Atma

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
First, I wouldn't recommend buying a hardware store amp. If you're going to get an amplifier, get a decent, 15DB Drop Amplifier. You will need several jumpers to hook this up properly.

How it should be hooked up, roughly, is this
Modem
----<
Amplifier ----- CATV Outlets.

Don't amp your modem. It's bad.
 

New member
Username: Shlalaw

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
-i have about the same setup. here's what i did to measurably improve my hdtv signal. the outside line is hooked up to a $4.50 directional coupler. the modem is run from the tap line on the coupler, and the out line on the coupler goes to a splitter, and then out to the tv sets, inclunding an hdtv set. the cable company had hooked it up bassackwards.
 

New member
Username: Moeschmoe

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
This discussion has been very helpful to me as well--I have a question though. Can you receive digital cable on every TV by inserting the amplified splitter on the line that comes out of the digital receiver before it goes into any TV?

Something tells me that this method of connecting violates terms of services. That's just my gut because the cable company I'm looking at says that if you want digital cable on more than one TV then you have to pay so much per month per receiver per TV.

Thoughts???
 

New member
Username: Atma

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jul-06
You could, but it would be relatively pointless. You would have to watch the same thing on every TV.
 

New member
Username: Jgenotte

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-06
I am having problems with my digital cable. Last weekend I moved my entertainment center from one room to another and am only having problems in the new room.

The cable coming in is split 3 ways with the 3.5db out going to the new room. A cable then runs about 100 ft around the house to a wall jack in the new room. Another 50ft cable from the jack to a 2-way splitter. After the 2-way splitter I have a 6ft cable to a +10db amp and another 6ft cable to the cable box.

I am getting intermintent functionality on most channels but none at all on others. I realize that the total cable length is rediclous but I dont have much of a choice.

Should +10db be enough? Would another +10db in serries help? Any other suggestions?

Thanks much,
-james
 

New member
Username: Karenfromusa

Salt Lake City, UT

Post Number: 1
Registered: Aug-06
Hello,

I have a question along this discussion line. I have digital cable and High Speed Internet. I would like to split the cable where my computer is, so that I can watch a small 6" TV on the desk while I am working.

The problem is, the speed of my connection is critical to my job. I cannot afford any loss of speed. If I use an amplified splitter, will this make my Internet connection as fast as if it was directly connected? Also, where does a person buy an amplified splitter, and how much will a good one cost? Or, should I just skip it entirely, if there will still be some loss of speed no matter what splitter I use?

Thanks,
Karen
 

New member
Username: Ooofence

Post Number: 1
Registered: Aug-06
Question for cable guy: I was just told by Comcast that if I install an amplified splitter it has the potential to "blow out" my cable modem. Is this true? If it is true, what can I use to amplify the signal in my house? Thank you for your help
 

Silver Member
Username: Formerly_fx

Dallas, Tx

Post Number: 158
Registered: Mar-06
I am not cableguy but why not install the amplifier after the cable modem?

xvxvxvx
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 825
Registered: Mar-05
xvxvxvx~ you're not me, but you're right on the money. Good to see ya posting again :-)
Chris~ amplify after the split for your modem and life will be good.
 

New member
Username: Whiskeyd0g

Post Number: 1
Registered: Aug-06
Next week a tech from TW will be coming out to install a cable card for me, I will be getting HD television for the first time. But I would like to split my signal so that I can utilize PIP. Does anyone who has been in the same situation have any suggestions?? What are my options for PQ while still retaining two separate signals, plus my cable modem? What splitter would you suggest ?
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 826
Registered: Mar-05
One of the only options you're going to have is to split the signal and take one leg of the split to an aux. device like a vcr. Most of the cable card tv's don't allow both tuners to be connected to allow PIP to work when using a cable card. Take jvc and sharp for example, in order for the cable card to work both the analog and digital tuner need to be connected just for the cable card. This would leave you no other options for RF connections to your TV. This isn't true with all brands of tv's which is why I said "most" tv's won't allow this via RF. You can ask the installer if he can provide you with one, and if he can't you want to get at least a 1MgHz splitter. If you have another tuneable device like a vcr RF into that device then composite cables out to the TV, that way you can watch all analog channels via the vcr on a video input while having the cable card/tuner on the TV as the secondary picture. The PQ shouldn't be that significant of a loss by adding a 2-way splitter behind your TV, if it is you have other problems.
 

New member
Username: Say_what

Post Number: 8
Registered: Mar-06
I am sure it was a typo, but the splitter should be at least 1GHz.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 827
Registered: Mar-05
typo or not paying attention, thanks for correcting...say what?
 

New member
Username: Say_what

Post Number: 9
Registered: Mar-06
No problem, Cableguy. Usually can't improve on your answers, just thought it might save some confusion.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Deep in the ... U.S.

Post Number: 829
Registered: Mar-05
lol I was working on a modem problem and I had MgHz on the brain...is it Friday yet????
 

New member
Username: Riggsjplugg

Post Number: 1
Registered: Sep-06
I have something to add to this. A question actually.

Do I need a special splitter to split Comcast's Digital Cable signal?

Line starts in house. Line connector on first splitters input is Red. Line going out to upstairs is red. Line going out to basement Digital Cable Box is blue on both ends. The cable used that feeds to the box in the basement is mine, but the Comcast engineer installed a blue connector (coax) on each end after he snipped of the originals. What do these colors mean?

I used to have a 2nd splitter after the first splitter. While the main splitter had a red connector for input still and a red connector on output going upstairs, the other side was sent to the 2nd cheap splitter with a regular $2.99 coax cable from radio shack or somewhere. Which was just fine for my AIW video card and basic cable straight to TV without a box. When I had that 2nd splitter hooked up, and added a digital cable box to the TV my digital cable box would not function. Comcast could not even send it a signal to reset it. They saw the box on, but could not reset it until I used just the single comcast splitter(WHICH WAS MY IDEA BTW), with all the comcast cables. Upon doing so the box immediatly clicked and reset. Works fine

I need a 2nd line in basement again. Should I get a decent three way splitter? I need some kind of advice. Not sure what the hell is going on but I am persuming that I have a crappy splitter and cable.

Out of ideas and don't want to blow cash on guessing. I want a signal amplifier too.

please help
 

New member
Username: Sparky3

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-06
I have a HDTV and a regular TV and also a modem to hook up through my cable. I would like to split my signal where it comes into the house with a 3 way splitter and run one line to the modem and then run the other two to the TVs. I also would like to use an amplifier as the one tv is a long run. I have had problems with the HDTV, sound drops and pixelation. My questions are as follows:

Am I correct in not running the modem signal through the amplifier.

You say not to buy a cheap store bought amplifier, but which one would you recommend?

Which type splitter do you recommend?
Can I buy an amplified 3 way splitter that you can connect to the modem, or bypasses the modem?
I appreciate any help you can give me. Thanks
 

New member
Username: Shlalaw

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-06
-find a directional coupler (regal is common). once connected to the outside line, the modem is run from the tap line (on the coupler). the out line (on the coupler) runs to a splitter which then splits to run to the tv sets, inclunding the hdtv. this hookup has worked great for me.
 

New member
Username: Jnye6625

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-06
I am a college student and live in a duplex. I have one room mate in my apartment, and there are 3 living in the other. The cable company detected a leak and disconnected the cable to the other apartment (we are the apartment paying the bill). Is there a way that I can move the cable to the inside of the house as opposed to running it outside and do something so they can not detect how many TV's we have? Here is a list of what we need to hook up: 2 digital receivers, 4 tv's, and 1 cable modem. Any suggestions?
 

Silver Member
Username: Formerly_fx

Dallas, Tx

Post Number: 191
Registered: Mar-06
"Any suggestions?"

Ever consider paying for the services? Thieves all think alike though, take any avenue to steal from others.

xvxvxvx
 

New member
Username: You_duke

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-06
Cable guy. Is it ok to put a 8 way splitter on my cable line were it enters house. I have a modem , 2 hdtvs, and 4 more tvs. seems like signal is a little weak after adding the 8 way splitter. before I was using a 4 way, before adding more tvs. should I put an amp in front of my 8 way splitter or get a amp powered splitter.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 875
Registered: Mar-05
Stephen~ unless my math is wrong, 2hdtv+4more tvs=6, if you split off using a direct coupler for your DC, use the tap leg to feed the modem and the through leg to feed into a 2-way amplifier, then feed the amp directly into a 6 way splitter you should be good to go. It is important that you use a 2-way amplifier and not a 1-way, and you shouldn't amp your modem. That's how we roll where I work.
 

New member
Username: Mr_zed

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-06
As to signal strengths and splitters, I have a question about my new Vizio HDTV. Sometimes, when I turn it on, I get audio but no video. Then, I shut it off, turn it back on and -- voila -- both picture and audio. There's a splitter -- with coaxials to the TV and to the DVD/VCR set.
Do you think this could be a signal strength problem or a Vizio glitch? Vizio techs said the former. I suspect the former. It's from Costco so I can readily return it.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 886
Registered: Mar-05
Simply turning off a TV and turning back on would have no effect on signal strength. You either have a good picture or you have a bad picture, but you wouldn't have no picture unless the splitter or signal was so bad it isn't enough to provide a picture. I'd have the TV checked out.
 

New member
Username: Edwin11423

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-06
i found this thread via google search and hope that you guys still read this from time to time! here goes:

i recently made the upgrade to hd and thus i now care about my cable connection. prior to going to hd, it was just a bunch of wires outside on the side of my house. i took a look at the splitter that the cable company has set up. it is a 3-way splitter.

1 output is listed as -8db and the other 2 outputs say -5b. now here's the question. as for which output i should be connecting my hd cable to, should i choose the -8db output or one of the -5db outputs?
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 888
Registered: Mar-05
The -5 is less the -8, which represents the amount of signal loss for those ports. Using the -5 would net you +3 over the -8, so if you're that worried about the signal strength take the -5.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Wanabtech

Post Number: 51
Registered: Apr-06
Be careful that you're not disturbing the line feeding the modem service. (providing you have modem service through your cable provider)
 

New member
Username: Thinkinghard

Post Number: 1
Registered: Dec-06
Hello all. I have a question. My cable company recently moved two channels that I'm fond of to a digital tier. I don't mind paying the extra $$ per month to go to digital, but the idea of paying to rent a converter for each tv really burns me. The question is - if I split the line and run one to a digital box on one tv and the other directly into another tv... will I be able to get basic channels on the second set? Will this upset the cable company? Any info greatly appreciated.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 889
Registered: Mar-05
If it's done properly, you shouldn't have any complaints. It's not illegal to run your own wiring, it's only illegal to still services. Running basic to an additional outlet is not considered theft of service (as long as you're splitting off your cable wire and not somebody else's lol)
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 890
Registered: Mar-05
*steal not still, man it's too early
 

New member
Username: Thinkinghard

Post Number: 2
Registered: Dec-06
Thanks for the info. Five bucks less to have to give them... my kids aren't old enough to care about sports or VH1 Classic yet anyway. :-)
 

New member
Username: Sama929

Mt. Prospect, IL

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jan-07
I have digital cable - WOW set it up, line in to a Genesys-II 2-way splitter (says 3.5dB for each out connector), one line to the cable modem for Internet and Phone. The other line to the dvr/cable box. All works fine. We have a dvr/digital cable box combo, a plain digital box and a plain analog box. Right now, we're not really using the second TV so I want to hook up BOTH the dvr/digital cable box combo and the plain digital box hooked to my tivo off the line, into different inputs on the TV.
I tried it with a 2-way splitter I grabbed at Walgreens (yeah, yeah) that has 3.7dB for both outs. It didn't work.
From what I've read here I'm going to take a wild guess - is that because I'd need the first splitter to be 3.5dB to the modem and like 7dB out to the cable boxes? (Or some other amount)

Any advice? Other than the digital channels, the rest of the features are working fine. (That had happened when WOW first installed the cable and put an inappropriate splitter on and it blocked (or didn't pass) the digital channels too.)

Thanks much, and happy new year!
Samantha
 

New member
Username: Seand85

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jan-07
I just installed my LCD tv and on the HD channels there is the occassional problem of pausing (nearly unnoticeable, but noticeable...). I live in a dorm building, and I was wondering if amplifying the signal out of the wall before splitting it into the two inputs on the tv would fix this? Any suggestions?
 

New member
Username: Blk

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jan-07
Two previous posts raised questions regarding the potential effects of overamplification. I am wondering about this as well as several other related issues.

I have 4 TV's on cable, 2 with digital STB's. We have experienced intermittent problems with pixelation, complete loss of picture, freezing picture & audio dropouts on both TV's with STB's (only on digital channels). Our cable co has sent techs out 4 times in the last 2 months to try and resolve this. Initially, cheap splitters and cable component connectors (that I bought myself) were cited and they replaced them all at no charge. Overall picture quality improved -- more vivid image -- but the intermittent glitches remained.

My set-up uses a 4way splitter fed by a jumper from the ground block. At each TV with an STB, the outlet feeds a 2way splitter, to feed the STB and the DVD recorder/VCR, so we can watch one channel while recording another. So in addition to line losses we lose -7db at the 4way and another -3.5db at the 2way.

Finally, one tech said my signal was on the cusp, considering my set-up and installed a Motorola 15db amplifier. He padded it down with a 6db attenuator to ensure the signal was not too hot. Told me if that if it didn't solve the problem, I should not run my cable through the power bar as there is a further 2.3 db loss there (according to the APC website). The glitches remained, on both TV's at the same time, and even after bypassing the power bars.

The next tech bypassed the amp, then checked the outlet signal and the signal at the ground block and said it was OK, 12db at the ground block, 5db at the one outlet he tested. He said an overamplified signal can cause the same problems on digital channels as a weak signal. We subsequently tried it, after he left, running it without the amp for a while, but still got glitches. On a hunch, I thought if he was correct that an overamplified signal could cause these problems, that maybe we do need an amp but perhaps we are amplifying too much. He left me some 3 dB and 6 dB pads and I tried every possible combination, padding down the amp in 3db steps. Still the glitches remain.

Finally I took off all the attenuators and let the amp run full blast. Still getting the glitches, but now am noticing a lot of green pixels when the pixelation occurs. At the moment, we are still getting some pixelation and audio dropouts, but so far have not noticed freezing or complete picture loss. The only other thing I can try to further boost the signal is bypassing the power bars again, which will theoretically eliminate a -2.3 dB loss. However, it would seem that with 12db at the block, if that is what it always is, and with a 15db amp, even allowing for losses, I should have a fairly strong signal at each STB.

I am, as a result, wondering if the intermittent problem is due to a signal strength that substantially varies, momentarily or for short periods of time. Our cable system is underground and there is a pedestal at the street. We experience temperature changes throughout the day and seasonal variations (we live in a northern winter climate)and I have read that this can lead to small variations in signal strength, but it wouldn't seem to account for one tech installing an amp, because I am "just on the cusp", and the next one bypassing the amp and saying my signal is good. Perhaps, one or both are mistaken or perhaps the signal strength varies intermittently by such a great degree that it causes our problem.

The cable co will respond to another call by probably booking another visit (no charge for this service), but we don't seem to be getting anywhere, so I am trying to research this problem myself.

1) Does anyone have any ideas as to what I might try next.

2)As far as overamplification is concerned, can it damage equipment and what does an overamplified signal look like? I saw one reference on a British website to high strength signals looking smeared but this may have been in reference to analog channels.

3) What signal strength do I need at the STB. I have seen references to various numbers on the internet, some suggesting anything from -10db to +10db with a preference for 0db, another which cited FCC requirements of +10.5 to +15.5db.

Would very much appreciate any input on these issues. Thank you.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 933
Registered: Mar-05
Bruce~ First let's address the issue at hand. The intermittent problems you are having more then likely are something wrong with the QAM signal, and needs to be checked with an analyzer. So...

1)Have them check your signal with a QAM analyzer

2)The only damage it will cause is your opinion of the picture :-)

3)Most STB's have a range of +15 to -15, although it is generally considered better between +10/-10. I would not want to see anything higher then +10 personally.

The bigger problem is the techs coming out to look at your problem are not identifying the root cause. Instead they are guessing and trying things that normally would correct problems with analog signal, but this doesn't apply to digital. It's not the signal level, it's the quality of the signal. I've seen -16 with no problems, I've seen +10 with problems. If there is some form of ingress breaking up the QAM signal, it doesn't matter how much or how little signal strength you have, it's not going to work properly. They should be looking for the QAM power level, SNR, BER, and MER. }
 

New member
Username: Window_guy

Post Number: 1
Registered: Feb-07
From reading this thread and from other sources, it seems my problems might best be resolved by a stronger signal. There are basically two problems I'd like to resolve.

One we've lived with for years and that the cable company has never been able to resolve is that in my bedroom, we can't view channels 67 through 69, due to scrolling, offset images, grainy or jumping video, along with intermittently loud or "fuzzy" sound. Viewing through the VCR provides clear reception on these channels and the same TV works great on all other outlets in the house. Weird!

The other problem is that on our DLP (with cable card) in the living room, we sporadically have problems with tiling or pixelating (not sure of the proper term, but I've seen both...), as well as not being able to receive channels 2 through 6 or 7 or 8. These last two come and go... and all these channels come in fine on this TV through the DVD player, I'm assuming due to the analog vs. digital difference. The tiling and freezing of the picture, along with losing the audio when it freezes is perhaps the most annoying and it happens intermittently on all channels. Sometimes it's worse than others and of course, whenever the cable guy has been out, the picture seems fine, with all channels coming in on this TV. The cable card has been replaced but it made no difference...

My house is the first one from the box, with the box actually being located in my yard. From the incoming cable, my cable company initially added a Regal GRS3DGH 3-Way Splitter when the house was first built. To that I added an RCA DT4SP 4-Way Splitter. All ports have cables connected and are being used except one in a bedroom. I anticipate adding another 3 cables at least at some point in the future. I've mix and matched connections between all the ports and various TV's and the modem and it doesn't seem to make any difference. (Even the modem worked fine regardless of which port was used!) The only difference has been attained when connecting the DLP TV directly to the incoming cable. Perfect reception on all channels then and only then. Connecting to the 3.5dB outlet on the Regal splitter with nothing else connected produces the same results as connecting everything in any configuration though.

I don't have any confidence that the cable company can or will provide a stronger signal, based on previous discussions with their office and the cable guy. Who, by the way is fantastic! He's been so helpful and encouraged me to replace some of the cables and connectors with higher quality components, which I did as suggested.

That leaves amplification on my side. Is this legal, or within most cable companies rules, and is it something I can do without great expense on my part, only to find it doesn't resolve my problems? Should I press the cable company to do this, if it proves necessary?

All the cabling is RG6, although it's not quad-shield. (The bedroom was originally RG59, but I changed it per the cable guys suggestion...) Everything came with crimped connectors already installed and I brought proper lengths to ensure I didn't have to cut or splice or use any extra connectors on any runs.

Long post, but I'm hoping I won't take up too much of anyone's time with questions and answers going back and forth. Thanks in advance for any help!
 

Silver Member
Username: Formerly_fx

Dallas, Tx

Post Number: 228
Registered: Mar-06
Either your Regal splitter is faulty or the cable running from the demark entering your house to the splitter is faulty.

xvxvxvx
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 939
Registered: Mar-05
Something you could have the cable guy do is ask him to run you a direct wire right from the tap straight to your tv. If you're still having problems with break up, or the channels not coming in, the problem is in the main line feeding your neighborhood. If the problem goes away, process of elimination would say to then run the line directly to the groundblock. If the problem goes away the line from the tap to your house was bad, if the problem is still there either the splitter of the wiring is at fault. It's not so complicated. Review:
1. Run wire from tap to tv, if problem gone move on to step 2. If problem still there problem is with the main line and they need to find where the problem is outside.
2.Run wire from tap to groundblock, if problem still there move to step 3, if problem gone you had a bad wire from tap to house.
3.Replace the splitter, if problem still there move to step 4. If problem gone splitter was causing the problem
4. Replace the wiring from the splitter to the tv. Problem should be gone, if not start isolating the problem by removing other lines from the connection to see if something is backfeeding through the house wiring that is causing the problem.
Amplifying the signal may help if your signal strength is too low, but amplifying a bad signal will only give you a stronger signal with the same problems.
Good luck
 

New member
Username: Window_guy

Post Number: 2
Registered: Feb-07
Thanks Scooby and Cableguy. That was fast! I don't think it's the splitter as our cable guy replaced it once. (Sorry I didn't mention that... I mentioned so much else! <g>) Putting the RCA splitter first and using only a single connection to it doesn't improve things either.

I think I'll call the cable company and talk to them about the suggestions you made Cableguy. I appreciate your time and the benefit of your knowledge. I'll let you know how things turn out.
 

New member
Username: Shlalaw

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jul-06
-have you tried a directional coupler? it greatly improved my hd signal strength, without any problems to my analog tv's or cable modem.
 

New member
Username: Window_guy

Post Number: 3
Registered: Feb-07
Well, it's done and better now! Our cable guy came out and went about his business, first checking connections and cabling and then signal strength. Upon viewing the signal strength on the computer, at the big screen and then where the service entered the basement , he said "we'll probably just have to run a new drop". Wow! Just like that? After the guy last year indicated how difficult that would be to get "approved"? This guy laughed and said their's no approval needed, the other guy probably just didn't want to do it. Anyway, he dug through the snow to find the cable coming into the house and then again to find the cable box out in the yard and he ran new cable along the fence. They'll come out and bury it within a month of the ground thawing. (Winter backlog...)

Interestingly, he found a splice just underground where it came up to enter our house and another one just underground where it came up to enter the cable box and then a third actually inside the cable box! No wonder we've always had spotty service, even before we got digital. We've noticed snowy screens during exceptionally wet weather before, but they never found the cause. Duh!!!

No more tiling or freezing on the digital! Internet speed's back up to 3mb from 300 - 500kb! And I doubt we'll have the snowy pictures as the ground thaws or when it rains particularly heavy or for several days.

AND he even helped me layout my future expansions and explained their pricing for mounting the splitters and an amplifier to be installed after the first splitter that supplies the cable modem and digital big screen. He was very complimentary of the current setup and particularly how I had everything mounted and labeled. I'll gladly pay them to do it after dealing with this guy though!

Thanks all for the advice. It seems Cableguy that yours was spot on!
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 961
Registered: Mar-05
Window_guy~ (pardon me for quoting you) "Thanks all for the advice. It seems Cableguy that yours was spot on!"

Scary thought huh? Item #2 was the culprit

Seriously though...it was nice to see somebody came out that actually gave a damn about your problem and more importantly went right about his business doing his job. That's a great follow up story, thanks for letting us know how things turned out!
 

New member
Username: Mdrausch

Post Number: 1
Registered: Mar-07
Ok, quick question.

I am finishing my basement, adding 2 more cable plates (bringing me to a total of 7 for the house).

My question is will I see a real difference between a 5Mhz to 2Ghz range splitter and a 5Mhz to 1Ghz range splitter?

The reason I ask is that I can find an 8 way 1Ghz splitter, but only up to 4 way 2 Ghz splitters.

If there is a real quality difference I will get the 2 ghz splitters.

Also if the 2ghz splitters are recommended, do you recommend going

source TO 2 way TO cable modem and amp
amp TO 2 Way TO 4 Way and 3 Way
4 way to TV's
3 Way to TV's

OR

source TO 2 way TO cable modem and amp
amp TO 4 way TO 4 Way and TV's
Final 4 Way to remaining TV's


If 1 GHZ would be enough I was thinking:

source TO 2 way TO cable modem and amp
AMP TO 8 way TO TV's

Any advice would be very VERY appreciated.
 

Silver Member
Username: Cableguy

Somewhere on... U.S.

Post Number: 967
Registered: Mar-05
Main feed going thru ground block into DC splitter. Tap leg feeding modem, thru leg feeding amp. Amp feeding splitter to TV's. The number of splits after the amp can be combined any number of ways, but it's best to keep it simple.
 

New member
Username: Mdrausch

Post Number: 2
Registered: Mar-07
Thanks much for the feedback.

What do you think as far as a 1Ghz splitter vs the 2 ghz splitter... think I will really notice any difference?
 

New member
Username: Mdrausch

Post Number: 3
Registered: Mar-07
Also, does anybody have an opinion on which would work better

A Motorola 484095-001-00 Amp + a Monster SS8RF 8 way splitter

Or just simplifying and going with a Cable Vision CVT28PIA II (8 way amplified splitter)

Or will they basically be a wash.

Sorry to pepper so many questions. I think I am about done though =)

Thanks again
 

New member
Username: Drdarren

Post Number: 1
Registered: Apr-07
here is my problem and i apologize if it sounds similar to others but i havent found exactly what i am looking for on these post. i have 6 tv's in the house, two have hd. from the cable coming into the house, i have a split. one splits to a two way for the hd sets and the other splits to a 5 way for the other sets.( i know i have only 4 other tv's but that is what the cable company put on) i am not too concerned about the 5 way split as it is for small tvs in the kids rooms and extra rooms. there is an amplifier between the first splitter and the splitter for the two hd sets. i also have a 2 way splitter on each cable going to the hd sets since they are splitting to hd cable boxes and tivo. my hd picture is great but my analog/digital pics are not great. what else can i do to improve the signal? thanks in advance for the help.
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