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Another area to split a HD signal?

 

New member
Username: Woodeke

Merritt island, Fl Usa

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jul-06
Hello!
I have a HD set and a HD cable box. Standard cable out of the wall to the box.

Can I split the red/blue/green HD cables that come out of my cable box, which normally go directly to my HD tv, to add a smaller hd monitor/set (15 in.) in my kitchen? I don't really need sound, because my Apartment is small, and I can hear the bigger set throughout my place. (so I don't mind having the same channel on both at all times either).

I just dont want to go out and buy a smaller HD set and find out the HD signal that comes out of the cable box can't be interfered with. I assume its "just a signal" but what do I know?

Thanks I appreciate it!
W
 

New member
Username: Woodeke

Merritt island, Fl Usa

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jul-06
I also (just noticed) that the three cables are labeled as such: the RED one (Pr) , The BLUE one (Pb) and the GREEN one (Video Y/ V).

Does this complicate my plan?

Thanks Again!
W
 

Gold Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 1026
Registered: Feb-04
Gene, you raise an interesting question, one that I don't recall seeing before. I'll tell you up front that I really don't know the answer. This much I can say, those "red/blue/green" wires--known as "component" cable--are carrying a very high frequency signal. In contrast to ordinary analog audio at 20-20,000 Hz, HD video demands up to 35 MHz signal transmission on those cables. So adequate signal strength and lack of outside electrical interference are concerns.

Splitting the component output will compromise signal strength, particularly with a long run to the kitchen. That long run also makes outside interference a real possibility. Furthermore, the use of cheap "Y" adaptors designed for audio will add to the possibility of problems.

As I said, I really don't know if this will work, but if I were you I would seriously consider having the cable company install a second HD box in the kitchen. Admittedly, this will add to the clutter there, not to mention adding another $100 or so per year to your cable bill. But the advantages of doing this are obvious.
 

New member
Username: Woodeke

Isle of Merritt, Fl Usa

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jul-06
Thanks for the info! You really got me thinking.

From what I've gathered, signal strength is everything when it comes to HD, so a "splitter" only degrades the initial signal. I need at least 25 feet for my other monitor and the LoS is probably not going to help either TV.


Here's what I'm gona' do. 1st I may try a cheap splitter on my own, buying a true component split cable (if it can be bought at Radio Shack).

If I cant find one or that doesn't work, I'm bidding on a component video amplifier on Ebay. They are really not considered "splitters", but typ. have 3 to 5 ways (ports) once the initial signal is connected. This way I will have zero signal loss no matter how many tv's I hook up. I could even add another in the bedroom if I want.

This is probably made for bars/pubs that want to have one cable box, and support more than one monitor/HDtv (the one I'm bidding on Ebay supports up to 8 - kinda over-kill for me but it works). At least Loss of Signal wont be an issue, and it's current bid is 40.00 (normally $300.00 new).

Thanks for the info! It really helped.

P.S. I was really shy about posting my question on the site, because I did some serious searching and couldnt find anything. Thanks again for the info! Hopes this helps someone in the future with the same needs! (I'm suprised it hasn't come up before!) I'll let you know if the cheap Split cable works, although I'm not counting on it.

Thanks,
E
 

Gold Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 1029
Registered: Feb-04
Another possible solution might be the use of an upgraded cable box--one with an HDMI output. You could use that output for one of the TVs and the component out for the other. This, of course, assumes that one of the TVs in use has an HDMI (or DVI) input. I have no idea how many 15" HDTVs have digital video inputs, but most likely your main TV has one.

Please record your experience here. It will be useful information.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Scherrman

Post Number: 18
Registered: Mar-06
Gene, I know exactly what you need. All you need is a component/HDTV distribution amplifier. I am an electronics manager for a small business and i use these to send HD signals for up to 9 tv's. Also sends audio. Probably cost around $100-$150.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_s

Columbus, Ohio US

Post Number: 1030
Registered: Feb-04
There you go Gene---thanks corey

http://www.savinglots.com/lotprod.asp?item=CEIAV400COMP
 

Bronze Member
Username: Indianbill007

Bhilai, Chattisgarh India

Post Number: 13
Registered: Dec-06
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