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Bose Companion 3 Series 2

 

New member
Username: Sparkyyykid

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-16
Hey new to the forums here hopefully i've posted in the correct thread. Anyways my bose C3S2 gave out today after a bit of googling i figured it was the control pod(this wasn't the case), however after cutting my cord and by passing it by jumping pins on the DIN 9 connector ive managed to get audio out of all 2.1 speakers however the sound only plays when I go from ON -> OFF with the switch in the back for about 2 seconds then turns off obvsly because i've turned it off... No sound when i turn it on only when i turn it off. Its like the amp inside wont hold it or something but when I turn it off it plays for a second or two. Any help?? thanks
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 18237
Registered: May-04
.

Do you have a schematic for this unit? What test equipment do you have available?
 

New member
Username: Sparkyyykid

Post Number: 2
Registered: Jun-16
No unfortunately I do not have a schematic for the SUB/AMP combo unit. Test equipment wise just a Fluke t5-1000 and a basic understanding of electronics, just looking if anyone has any ideas as to why the sound only plays when the device is turned off for a second...
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 18238
Registered: May-04
.


Your question is the same question we receive from numerous posters to this forum.

The answer basically always comes down to the same issues.

No schematic, no tools, no knowledge beyond a basic understanding of electronics, there's no way to guess at what needs to be repaired. And I've long ago stopped guessing about such things.

Bose does not issue service information to anyone other than an authorized Bose service center.

A basic understanding of electronics should suggest you cannot perform repairs unless you know what you are measuring and why.

What the question always implies is; I don't think it's all that important to be trained as a technician nor do I think you need any special tools to do so.

Maybe that's not what you mean. Possibly, you mean I can do this myself if only someone would tell me exactly what to do.

Either way, both attitudes are, IMO, wrong.



Quite often, when a component part or a circuit fails it is due to some unseen failure upstream ahead of that area. If you are only trying fix the obviously failed component, you will continue to blow up replacement parts. That's one reason service shops don't hire just anyone who walks in off the street with only a basic understanding of electronics. Consider for one minute you response to being billed for all the parts the unqualified tech blew up with only an explanation that the tech has no more than a basic understanding of electronics. You take your equipment to a qualified technician because you expect a qualified service technician will be doing the work.

Since a good deal of the functionality of a modern receiver is based on chip technology, it is often a matter of replacing chips with, say, 120 or more pins. You can't do that sort of removal and replacement work unless you do that sort of work all the time and you have the equipment to work in such restrictive conditions.

At best, many of the values you would be measuring as you troubleshoot will be in the milliVolt level. Your meter alone is insufficient to do that work. You cannot measure a cap with your meter. You cannot place your component under load with that equipment alone.

Etc, etc, etc.

Either you see the error of asking for this sort of information or you continue to feel you can make this work if only someone holds you hand.

The age of being told to check the fuses is over. Modern electronics require a trained technician with sufficient tools - including a schematic and servicing data - to do the job. Bose is very controlling with its data.

I would suggest you simply take the unit to an authorized Bose service center. A basic understanding of electronics and a DVOM isn't going to get this job done on your kitchen table.

You can certainly try another forum. Possibly, there is a Bose technician waiting to answer such questions. I seriously doubt it. More than likely, what you will get is a lot of grief over buying Bose in the first place.

I personally don't care what you own. Pioneer is not easier to repair than is Bose. Audio Research doesn't send out service data to the average owner either. That's simply how modern consumer audio works when it doesn't work.


My answer will always be the same, you can't fix this yourself unless you are fully prepared to do the job. And, if you have to ask what's wrong, you do not have the tools or the knowledge to fix what's wrong.




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New member
Username: Sparkyyykid

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jun-16
Fair enough I understand. Thought I'd give it a try and see if anyone came across the same problem as me and if they found a solution to fix it.
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