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2 Identical Amplifiers / 1 Source

 

Bronze Member
Username: Learners_permit

Post Number: 25
Registered: Jan-12
Wondering if anyone could provide an answer to my ultra limited knowledge regarding the above subject.
Is it possible to connect 2 identical amplifiers to a single source?
I am thinking of connecting 2 identical amplifiers to my Oppo 93 Blu ray player. My setup would be like this:

1. Source RCA Front Left & Right Output to Amplifier A Input Left & Right
2. Source RCA Rear Left & Right Output to Amplifier B Input Left & Right
3. LFE is connected directly from source output via RCA to Powered Subwoofer
4. No Centre connection

Is this a weird setup? The reason for this setup is because the 2nd amplifier was given free by the seller and I do not know what to do with it.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17801
Registered: May-04
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You can split any output. You should not combine inputs.

In other words, you should not take the left and right signals from your source and plug both lines into one input on the amp without a device in between which would maintain the separation of the signals, a mono switch on a pre amp would work. A mono transformer would typically be needed to combine two amplifier outputs into one speaker. Two amplifiers should not be connected to one driver in a loudspeaker or to one section of a loudspeaker.


What you seem to want though is to run your source player as a stereo component running into the two discrete (left/right) inputs of each amp. That sort of connection will work as far as electrical compatibility is concerned - with some warnings attached. However, using another amp just because you have an extra amp doesn't typically make sense. First, the two amps are unlikely to track the signal equally and an imbalance in output will result. Unless you have some way to match the input sensitivity of the two amps, this probably isn't a good idea. None of this even addresses any potential sound quality differences between the two amps and that you are normally better off just using one amp for the entire speaker unless you are fairly sophisticated about how audio operates.

Next, what are you going to do once you have the two amps running and you only have one speaker for that channel? You don't make clear what your plans are for the amps' output but it sounds as if you might be thinking of running both amps to one speaker per side. In most cases this isn't a good idea. You cannot have two amps connected to the same drivers and not expect damage to occur. If your speakers are capable of "bi-amp" connections, you might get away with this if there are no common ground connections in the speaker. I'd recommend you contact your speaker manufacturer before making any such connections since buzz words such as "bi-amp" are rather loosely tossed round today. At the least, there's a good chance you will have a ground loop which causes a loud hum in the system. At its worst, you could do permanent damage to the system.

Still, you are potentially looking at a mismatch between the two amps and less than stellar results with your proposed connection. If you were experienced enough to know the potential pitfalls and make certain to avoid them, then what you suggest could possibly work. For someone with "ultra limited knowledge" of how a system operates on a purely electrical level, I'd say this isn't the best plan you'll come up with today.



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Bronze Member
Username: Learners_permit

Post Number: 26
Registered: Jan-12
"You can split any output. You should not combine inputs."

Yes, I am aware of that. The input is not combined.

" In other words, you should not take the left and right signals from your source and plug both lines into one input on the amp without a device in between which would maintain the separation of the signals, a mono switch on a pre amp would work. A mono transformer would typically be needed to combine two amplifier outputs into one speaker. Two amplifiers should not be connected to one driver in a loudspeaker or to one section of a loudspeaker."

All inputs & outputs are NOT combined. The Oppo Blu ray player has 7.1/5.1 channels capability. I am connecting a pair of RCA Interconnect to the Front Left & Front Right Output to the Input of Amplifier 'A'.
Similarly, another pair of RCA Interconnect is connected to the Output marked Rear Left & Rear Right to the Input of Amplifier 'B'.
I have 2 pairs of speakers - one pair for the Front Left & Right for Amplifier 'A' and one pair for Rear Left & Right for Amplifier 'B'.

The rest of what you have written is a bit too much for me to understand or how to operate. Therefore I do not intend to go near there.

I connect a RCA to the player marked 'Sub' to the Powered Subwoofer.
The Blu ray player has a RCA for Centre is not connected.
By the way, the amplifiers are Carot One (Ernestolo) Class-T.

Hope it makes sense. Thank you.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17802
Registered: May-04
.

As written, two amplifiers sending left/right signals to two pairs of speakers (front and rear), you should be fine.

Sorry, I neglected to see the mention these amps are "identical". There should be no concerns with level matching beyond what would normally occur for balancing the system levels front to back.

There is a slight chance you might have a ground loop hum as a result of the two amps. However, if they are connected to the same AC circuit - most especially if they are connected to the same outlet or the same outlet by way of an extension box/AC conditioner/surge protector, you shouldn't have any problems.


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