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DVD-Audio problem

 

New member
Username: Alansilberlight

New York, New York USA

Post Number: 1
Registered: Oct-12
I am quite a bit perplexed and am turning to others for a possible solution or explanation to my problem.

I have a 2008 Toyota Land Cruiser that has a DVD-Audio player. I have made my own DVD-Audio discs for three years. I have used Minnetonka Bronze and DVD-Audio Solo from Cirlinca. I have had a problem playing many of these discs. They play for a while and then they skip—momentary silence, they continue to play, more instances of momentary silence and then they refuse to play. Ejecting and re-inserting the disc does not help.
I have tried to think of every possibility. Let me bring out the following:
These discs play absolutely perfectly in my Yamaha home DVD-Audio players. They never skip.
The car player plays CDs and DVD-Video discs perfectly. I have never had this problem.
The car player plays commercial DVD-Audio discs perfectly. Never a problem.
In case this means anything, all of the discs that I have made have paper labels. However, again, the problem exists only with DVD-Audio discs that I have made and have attempted to play in the car player. I intend to make a DVD-Audio disc, not put on a label and play it in the car to see what happens.
If anyone has an idea about why I have this problem, I would be very grateful.
Thank you very much.

Alan Silberlight
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17450
Registered: May-04
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Does the car player claim to work with DVD-RW discs? If not, that's your problem.
 

New member
Username: Alansilberlight

New York, New York USA

Post Number: 2
Registered: Oct-12
I would like to thank you for responding to me. I do appreciate it. I checked the manuals for both the car player and the home player. The manual for the car player states that DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW and DVD+RW discs "may not be playable." The manual for the home players (Yamaha DVD-S1800) states that such discs may be used. Also, the manual for the home player warns against the use of labels.

I intend to create a DVD-Audio disc without a label. We'll see what happens in the car player. I'll post the results after listening to the disc.

Interestingly enough, I have been able to use DVD+R discs in the car player in the DVD-Video format.

I guess that the only DVD-Audio discs that I will be able to play in the car are the commercially made ones; I have a vast collection of three!
It is unfortunate that most pop music is not available in the DVD-Audio format.

Again, I thank you for responding to me.

Alan Silberlight
 

Platinum Member
Username: Jan_b_vigne

Dallas, TX

Post Number: 17456
Registered: May-04
.

The now "ancient" DVD-Audio format was displaced by consumer opinion several years ago in favor of SACD. Unfortunately, consumers turned their backs on multi-channel, hi-rez music sources for the most part. SACD recently left the market without so much as a whimper after dwindling down to only a few labels using the technology. For the most part, the formats did themself in with their insistence on watermarking and anti-piracy technology which did not serve the public interest as much as it did that of the recording industry. No one was looking for the music industry or the artists to loose on the production of digital copies but, in the end, the industry overall, and the consumer specifically, lost out with tecnology and hardware that has gone the way of the dodo bird. Many of us had rather expensive players for these formats which, like LaserDiscs, are now completely useless as high end music sources.

Pop music was a major disappointment in the multi-channel. hi-rez formats since their appeal went more to classical and jazz music listeners and most of the pop/rock/blues/etc recordings on either format were somewhat limited to re-issues of older - many times analog soruced - recordings. Then again, pop music on a multi-channel format made a mishmash of the music and not many people thought the mastering techniques employed by the music industry made for enjoyable music reproduction in the home. Very few listeners on the music side of the system set up multi-channel systems and those who played the discs through their HT receivers quickly found the weaknesses of HT receivers outweighed the benefits of multi-channel playback. In the end, everyone lost out other than the few manufacturers who sold a production run or two of gear.

I suspect your player warns about the use of labels because they tend to catch on the loading mechanisms of many players. This results in discs being stuck inside machines which can lead to costly repair bills when they are extracted by a technician or damaged discs when the consumer attempts to save a few bucks on a do it themself try. I too would say don't use stuck on labels on any disc unless you are prepared to deal with the problems they might cause.



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