Ripping DVD-A/DTS/SACD to Computer

 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 126
Registered: Apr-04
I started this question over in the DVD section of Home Theater but thought it might be more appropriate here since my main concern is audio.

I want to be able to take recordings that I only have in DVD-A/SACD format and "rip" them to my computer so I'll be able to download to iPod - thus, I don't care about whether multichannel is retained, etc.

Here's what I have found so far - for Mac computer:

1. Use OSEx to extract the audio track from the DVD-A to .ac3 file. I've gotten this to work on one DVD-A. On another DVD-A, the extraction worked but the resulting conversion of .ac3 to .aiff produced no sound. And, OSEx wouldn't even recoginze a DTS recording I put in.

2. Once the .ac3 file has been extracted, I use bd4go to convert it to .aiff.

I have not found a solution yet for non-hybrid SACD. Perhaps this requires hardware interface between Mac (PowerBook) and the audio equipment?

Kegger this seems like it would be in your area of expertise. Have you done anything like this?
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 358
Registered: Dec-03
unfortunitaly ghia i am currently working on this
myself and at the moment don't have any info for
you.

i have so many projects right now that this is a
low priority for me.

and i don't use mp3 or aiff so for me i was just
trying to make copies but i'm sure along the way
of figuring how to do what i want the other should
be easy.

i have bean able to copy them and get the music
to play but not the high rez material on the disk
i wanted.

sorry!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1338
Registered: Dec-03
Ghia, Kegger,

With respect, I think you will never be able to copy SACD DSD files without some very serious, and probably totally illegal, decryption software, and firmware.

As you may recall, it is my opinion is that this is the whole point of SACD/DSD: to make copying impossible, or so difficult that people are wasting their time trying. Any improvement in sound quality over CD is incidental. IMHO.
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 412
Registered: Dec-03
never say never john!

if you remember that is what they said about dvd's also!

and now it's all over the place for free.


trust me anything can be copied,nothing is safe!!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1346
Registered: Dec-03
Great, Kegger! I, too, like a challenge!

But really, aren't there better things to figure out...?

If Sony doesn't want me to copy SACDs, that's just fine by me - the feeling is mutual!

BTW I am still interested - let us know how you get on. Then I'll let you know how to hack into the Pentagon..... (big smiley - hope the survellience guys have sense of humour)
 

Silver Member
Username: Kegger

MICHIGAN

Post Number: 413
Registered: Dec-03
as i stated on my original post to ghia this is
a low priority for me.

i have many other things to complete first before
i spend any time on this issue.

probably by then someone else will figure it out
for me and i won't have to do anything!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1347
Registered: Dec-03
Kegger,

That is where I am, too.
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 138
Registered: Apr-04
My primary reason for wanting to "copy" them is so I can listen to the cd's on the iPod too. Obviously, with a regular CD, you have the ability to play the original CD through the home audio system as well as copy the songs for portability. With DVD-A and SACD, this isn't an "outright" option.

I haven't had time since my original attempts to work on it. What I have discovered is it is a pain in the a$$ to do and, what works with one recording doesn't work on another.

This will factor into my decision on what to purchase in the future. For instance, if a release is available on both DVD-A and Hybrid SACD, I'll purchase the Hybrid SACD because I know there will be a redbook track that can be easily ripped. I've seen a few instances where the same recording is on SACD-only as well as Hybrid SACD - you can save a few bucks on the SACD-only....but, for me, it would be worth it to pay a little extra to get the hybrid version. If a release is only DVD-A or SACD-only, then I've got to make a decision if it is worth it to buy it only for home audio use or if it is worth the "pain in the a$$" effort to try to rip it.

This (lack of portability) has been the first drawback I've experienced with the hi-rez world.....
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1391
Registered: Dec-03
I understand, Ghia. And welcome back.

But it will be hilarious if SACD "wins" the format war because people choose hybrid discs in order to copy the CD tracks onto iPod and MP3 players. What sweet irony. The new, "hi-res" format compressed to death; the uncopyable format taking over because people want to "rip" files off disc. What a strange world.

This is where I would like to paraphrase Jan, and maybe start a new "Old dogs" thread, as follows:-

By the way, am I the only person who thinks that music almost always sounds better when you are sitting still, in one place, and actually listening, instead of trying to do something else at the same time? How old I feel.

I wonder if you have seen Apple "Airport Express"? A wireless Airport base station, ethernet hub, etc. but with audio out (digital and analogue): just plug it into your receiver/amp audio input. This looks to me like another step on the road to networks transferring files, in place of discs and disc-players of any kind. Forward, the revolution.

http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 140
Registered: Apr-04
JohnA

Thanks, John!

You wrote: "By the way, am I the only person who thinks that music almost always sounds better when you are sitting still, in one place, and actually listening, instead of trying to do something else at the same time? How old I feel. "

Nothing to debate in that statement. But, "portability" doesn't necessarily translate to "multitasking". Case in point, even though I was away from my home audio system for 10 days, I still had access to 410 songs from my library thanks to the iPod. Each day ended with "listening" to the music from the iPod and my headphones. This was dedicated listening with nothing else going on. In fact, I didn't take the iPod with me to the beach or when fishing because the "music" of nature was fulfilling entertainment.

Granted the full sonic quality of the music was not the same with the iPod as with my home system, but, it beats the alternative of listening to radio static on crappy clock radios in the beach house. The beauty of this is I could have taken my entire library with me had I chosen to also take the PowerBook and firewire drive. Uh, my entire library...except for those DVD-A/SACD's that I haven't been to rip. Hence my original point of wanting portability for all music I have purchased.

Thanks for the Airport Express link. I had not seen that before. I wish this had been available at the time I was purchasing a Slim Device DAR. The Airport Express/AirTunes does pretty much the same but at half the price and twice the looks! :-)

 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 141
Registered: Apr-04
Clarification to previous post in regards to:

JohnA

You wrote: "By the way, am I the only person who thinks that music almost always sounds better when you are sitting still, in one place, and actually listening, instead of trying to do something else at the same time? How old I feel. "

My reply: "Nothing to debate in that statement".


Except for "how old I feel" - that may be debatable. I wouldn't want you to think that I agree that you are feeling old. ;-)
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 143
Registered: Apr-04
This technology might make this "ripping" quest a moot point...

"Fingerprint" Play Button
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1394
Registered: Dec-03
Ghia,

Thanks. Will follow the link later.

But, look, you will soon be able to keep your iTunes library on some internet server somewhere, and access and play the files from e.g. Point Reyes or the Barrier Reef. Maybe by satellite.

And, when we have ubiquitous, roaming Airport Wireless networks, like with cellphone networks.....

No wonder disc makers, and disc player makers, are sh*t scared.

Personally, I feel rejuvenated. What an interesting time to be around.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1400
Registered: Dec-03
Ghia,

Thank you for that link. If that is not satire, then things are worse than I thought. Please don't tell your employer about that one. Jeez, what a world. We need a Bill of Rights for the digital age. Those guys should be behind bars.

You just keep ripping away, Ghia. I am going to start, myself, after reading that.
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 144
Registered: Apr-04
I agree, JohnA. This is the "bad" part of technology. The sickening part - aside from the actual technology - is the attitude of the developers who seems to think this is a benefit. It is....only to RIAA and the major labels.

It might be time to reread "1984".
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1407
Registered: Dec-03
Great, Ghia. Thanks!
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 227
Registered: Feb-04
For those of you who keep dropping references to 1984 and Orwell (or Eric Blair), I just want to let you know that we're well beyond that now. Doublespeak is now the official language of politics (best illustrated in the U.S. by such new laws as the "Healthy Forest Initiative" [i.e., opening up federal land for logging] and the "Patriot Act," which gives the state the right to spy on you if you're a "suspected" terrorist) and Room 101 is located in Guantanamo Bay (with an Abu Ghraib annex). I just yawn now about such things as the fingerprint play button. What we need now is a sequel to 1984 that warns us how much worse it can really get, since we are, for the most part, already living in the dystopia portrayed in 1984.

As far as technology, it seems the public has a deep, psychological anxiety about it, which manifests itself in movies, e.g., the Matrix trilogy, the Terminator series, and the upcoming I, Robot. The old scary monsters of yore, which fed and played on our subconscious anxieties, are now being supplanted by machines. We're ingenious enough now to create our own nightmares.

Have a good day :-)
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1411
Registered: Dec-03
Thanks, 2c. Probably we have always created out own nightmares. Witches, The Green Man, Frankenstein's monster. That's what is in room 101 for each of us. I think science and technology are the antidote. We just have to make sure that knowledge is distributed, shared; not held, exclusively, by a privileged few. I think we have had this sort of discussion before, under "Twilight of the CD...?" I think. Science is knowledge and understanding; technology is how to do things. They are the solution, not the problem. The problem is people, what they do with power, and how they maintain it.

Thanks for recommending "Amadeus" a while ago, by the way. Excellent.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 228
Registered: Feb-04
John A.,

I don't remember recommending "Amadeus," but I'm glad you enjoyed it. It's funny you mention it because I went to the same high school as the actor who played Mozart, Tom Hulce. Perhaps you knew that clairvoyantly and associated the movie with me.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1415
Registered: Dec-03
2c,

It was JOHN S, then many others, including My Rantz, Gregrory, on
http://www.ecoustics.com/electronics/forum/home-audio/24347.html

Sorry, I think I regard you as one of the classical consultants!

I don't think clairvoyance travels through the internet. Perhaps it depends on the cables.....

My mother went to the same school as Cary Grant. Remembers him. Archie Leach.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 230
Registered: Feb-04
John A., yes, that's it! You can only get clairvoyant communication through expensive cables, with a bigger soundstage and deeper bass. I always wondered why cables could cost so much.

I'm ready for another rant on technology, but I will spare your eyes... and drink a beer.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1423
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents,

And we must always remember to have the arrows pointing in the right direction....

I think this is as good as thread as any for a good, cathartic rant about technology. Ghia started this thread, and has some reservations about the whole thing, as I recall from another. I will play the technophile role, if you like, but I suspect we agree on most things.

The older I get, the less convinced I am am that anything is really new. I read and hear the the industrial revolution (UK, actually Scotland, was pretty well first in) spawned a whole counter-reaction, from pre-Raphaelites, ruralists, William Morris, William Blake, Mary Shelley, Byron (jeez) and an abiding passion for Gothic architecture (Houses of Parliament; St Pancras Station all that). Utopia was going to be in the Lake District, or just possibly the West Country, near the Welsh border. Romantic Nationalism was a curse, in my view, and the precursor of all the appalling things that happened in the twentieth century. (This explains most of my general reservations about Wagner, Mahler et al - boy you should read that Naxos Greig DVD-A sleeve note, those guys have learned NOTHING). And there was a Nobel-Prize winning physicist (Lord Kelvin) explaining how he had proved that people could never travel by train, because they would all suffocate at speeds greater that 30 m.p.h.

Maybe the most you can say for UK is that it had had more time to get over the trauma than, say Germany.

But, as I've said this before, the baton has now passed to the US. You, 2c, are there, right on the edge of it, on the West Coast. "What America does today, the world does tomorrow; ....and California did yesterday". Any bulletins from the front line completely welcome! I just wish people would LEARN FROM THEIR MISTAKES.

All the best.

PS Anchor Steam Beer, I trust. I'd love to join you.
 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 231
Registered: Feb-04
John A.,

Actually it was a Sierra Nevada (highly recommended btw) and this is the kind of topic discussed over drinks with a lot of time on our hands. Yes, we can thank the Brits for starting the industrial revolution. Thomas Jefferson actually envisioned the U.S. as an agrarian nation. He wasn't a Romantic Nationalist; he was a product of the Enlightenment. One could believe in the virtues of an agrarian society without forsaking the pursuit of knowledge. Technology was sold to the public as a way of freeing our time for more leisure activities when in fact it has had the opposite effect. We're more productive than ever, but we're also working longer hours than ever. The average worker today works more hours than an agrarian worker four hundred years ago. Who or what are we serving with our increased productivity and labor? What excessive productivity leads to is excessive consumption. A counter-trend that has gotten some media attention here in the Bay Area involves simplifying one's life--downsizing our houses, accumulating fewer material goods, working fewer hours, and finding more time for personal pursuits. These aren't nostalgic hippies by the way. My girlfriend used to work in the dot com industry and worked crazy hours. Now she is teaching part-time and seems happier. I think sometimes we need to step back and take a look at whether technology really benefits our lives. There's no question that it has raised the standard of living worldwide. But in industrialized countries it seems that technology has reached a tipping point where much of it no longer benefits our lives. Just some food for thought.

Peace.
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1430
Registered: Dec-03
Two Cents,

Yes, I sign up to the 18th century Enlightenment any time; I would have voted for Jefferson. The United States was a product of the Enloightenment, and sort of missed out the 19th century, I think. Probably a good thing, and one of the reasons I like it. The US was busy with its own problems at that time. Apart from war and the urge to re-draw the map of Europe, the industrialist Freidrich Engels was busy in Manchester, underwriting the time and work of Karl Marx. Darwin and Wallace were the real revolutionaries imho. One of the most significant refusals in history was Darwin declining, politely, to be a dedicatee of Das Kapital.


I worked, for a while, across the Bay from you. One beautiful, old red-tiled building had the inscription "To rescue for human society the native values of rural life". Isn't that right on target?

I am in total agreement with what you write. Most of the egg-heads, when I was a teenager in the 60s, agreed the second big problem for the future (if there was one) was what people would do with all the leisure time that technology would free up for them. I keep wanting to have a word with them.

Nice beer. One day...!
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 145
Registered: Apr-04
2c,

You wrote: "Who or what are we serving with our increased productivity and labor?"

Indeed. Currently, I'm reading "The Heart is a Lonely Hunter" - written in 1940 - in which that same question was asked. I just read the passage today and I actually had to stop reading to check the original publish date - because the prose was so relevant to modern society.

I agree with every single point you made in your 12:07p post. The "simple living" movement is one that has actually been around for a couple of decades but it has gotten slightly more "mainstream" in the last few years. I've tried to adapt some of the principles into my own life (although it's hard to convince folks of that when they see the home audio system, the iPod and the Powerbook...lol). But, in the past year I've moved out of a trendy (i.e. expensive) neighborhood to a smaller town, sold coastal property and have purged many of my possessions by taking them to Goodwill and/or giving them to friends. The primary goal of this is to position myself financially to move out of the field of technology as a means of support and into a career that has more meaning and is more beneficial to society....just have to figure out what that is.

But, yes, I personally believe that technology has become more burdensome and scary than beneficial. And, yes, you are right, it is beyond Orwellian and is beyond any point of return. Loved your Doublespeak examples!

 

Silver Member
Username: Two_cents

Post Number: 235
Registered: Feb-04
Ghia,

I sincerely wish you the best in figuring things out. You're not alone. I've been thinking a lot of that Jackson Brown line, "I turn to my friends to see me through/I look in their eyes and I see they're running, too."
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 154
Registered: Apr-04
Thanks, 2c! Yes, I think that line is perceptive and relevant to what many of us feel.

One good thing about technology is the ability to communicate with so many people from all over the world. Sometimes you find people who have more in common with you through this method than you can offline. In the area where I live, it seems as if everyone is all about image - not just physical appearances (although plastic surgeons here do big business) but your perceived financial standing too. The vast majority of these folks are living well byond their means to "keep appearances". I decided to get off that little Stepford wagon.

I think Chrissie Hynde poked through this shallowness and superficialness with her line "You can buy a squeegy little silicone sack/But it won't feed the world/ like the ones that I pack naturally..." lol!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 1520
Registered: Dec-03
A seriously distracting image and idea, there, Ghia!

By curious concidence, I have just expounded on the relevance of Nestlé formula feeds to the "Twilight of the Compact Disc...". What BS. I cannot even go back and read it.

Anyway, silicone implants for entertainment, plus Nestlé, to "feed the world". This cleary the current trend.

"How old I feel"....
 

Silver Member
Username: Ghiacabriolet

NC

Post Number: 160
Registered: Apr-04
Coincidence indeed.....If you think reading the line is a "distracting image and idea" you should hear how she sings it! lol! It is from a song called "Money Talk" on the Pretenders "Last of the Independents" cd.

I don't know how it is in Europe but in the US, most everything seems to be shallow and superficial.....implants (there is a "trend" this year for this to be "graduation" presents to high school girls from their parents), botox - even toe surgery for cosmetic reasons. Jan mentioned on another thread about the kind of car you drive being considered important...it's that way in my area too.
 

Pedro
Unregistered guest
Hi, I can see obviously that this topic maybe got a bit off and the question never properly answered. Has anyone come up with a system for doing this namely on PC, not a MAC like the original poster?

Here specifically is my situation. Recently I have become interested in 5.1 DVD-Audio Music. My question is this. Any recommendations of what program to use to rip a DVD-Audio Disc? What format should I encode it to? Obviously I want to encode it to a very high quality format as the source is 24bit/96kHz DVD audio where the excellent sound quality is kind of the point. I really don't care about the size of the resulting files I just want them in their full glory on my harddrive. I hate having to swap discs in and out all the time if I can avoid it. Would ac3 be a good candidate for this? If so, obviously, how do I do get it from the disc to this format?

In case you are wondering a site I am looking at to buy DVD's from is:
http://www.dtsentertainment.com/index.php

The Queen, a Night at the Opera DVD-Audio discs sounds pretty cool =)
Listening to CD's deisgned for surround sound is definetly a cool experience.

On a side note if it makes any difference I am using Klispch Promedia 5.1's (not the GMX's, the older, better ones) and a Creative Sound Blaster Audigy 2 Platinum.
 

Onirix
Unregistered guest
I am searching and searching for a way to get a few of my SACDs onto my computer, through a Mac or a PC, I do not care. Still nothing around on the net yet in 2005, but I will keep looking and get back to you guys.

Just wanted to add to the conversation by saying what format I intend to rip it to. I am starting the migration of all my CDs into Apple Lossless Audio format using iTunes. Not quite SACD quality, but an exact copy of my CDs and no loss of quality. I wanted to mention this to you audiophiles who have not yet discovered the Airport Express and one lovely feature it has: Optical connectivity to my stereo!

Here is the logic of this move to Apple Lossless: Hard drive prices are dropping fast. In the future space will not be an issue. I got 800 albums to rip and it takes time, so I have started now, and now I am up to 400 ripped into Apple Lossless and it is sitting on my PC upstairs. Using iTunes and its sharing feature I play them from my Mac laptop downstairs, stream them to the stereo in superb quality through the optical cable. Wow. By the fall or next year I figure I will be able to get a 500 or more gig drive to fit all my albums. By the time I have more of them, drives will be in the 1000s of gigs and no more worries.

Now, just need to get these darn SACDs ripped. I bought them, but I am now too lazy to get up and put them in the stereo!
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2777
Registered: Dec-03
Onirix,

I am more convinced about my position posted above on June 09, which, re-stated, is that the primary purpose of SACD is audio data encryption, so that people will invest in "packaged" recordings - discs - from which audio files cannot be copied, shared, or streamed.

If and when someone works out how to rip SACD files, and the method becomes generally available, then Sony-Philips will move to a new, stronger form of encryption. Their problem will be that they have run out of claims for the medium. CD was "perfect" once. SACD is now allegedly better than CD. What will they think of to promise, next?

I agree that Airport Express is excellent, and so is Apple Lossless; just like MLP in DVD-A. There is no loss if quality from smaller files.

I actually like "packaged" music, that is, well-presented discs with informative notes etc. The recording companies are not content to offer packaging as added value to the customer. They seem to wish to make it obligatory.

DVD-A was originally "in the clear" and I have successfully copied and burnt DVD-As, but CCPM copy protection is now on many DVD-A discs, since recording companies regard it as an essential feature. Same for DTS. You can send 5.1 DTS to an AV receiver with iTunes and Airport Express.

If they would just be open about all this, instead of diverting attention with ludicrous claims for mythical improvements in sound quality, then we would be clear where we stand, and could make informed decisions about which format to buy.
 

Gold Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 1358
Registered: Aug-04
" ludicrous claims for mythical improvements in sound quality"

Ah John, you are becoming the king of misinformation. My suggestion again - is to try sacd before posting such negative and incorrect comments. I'm beginning to make comparisons about you and pommie journalists :-)

 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2779
Registered: Dec-03
My Rantz,

Thank you. Yes, I would be interested to try SACD, but have no first-hand experience of it, and I do not claim otherwise. I think you are correct to recommend "universal" players.

The pommie journalists in the March HiFi News seem to dimiss all forms of surround sound as pointless gimmicks, at least for music, rather like J. Vigne on "Teaching and old dogs new tricks". And they are also sceptical about claims for SACD two-channel over CD. Do you have any experience of this, or views?

It is still the case that certain sections of the recorded music industry attempt to control customers' listening and purchasing behaviour, in a covert way. Nothing new in this. As I posted on "Old Dogs":

From 1970s ad for Sony Quadraphonic Sound:

New Quadraphonic albums every month

To be honest, there aren't all that many Quadraphonic records around yet. Remember when stereo first started? It's the same kind of situation!

However, CBS and EMI are now releasing new Quadraphonic albums every month. And where they lead, others are sure to follow.

It's worth buying Quadraphonic records, even before you get the sound system. You can play them on you stereo. You'll get the full stereo effect without damaging the Quadraphonic qualities. And when you buy the system, you'll be well stocked up with the records to match.


Thirty years later, Sony owns the entire CBS catalogue, and is pushing SACD as hard as it can, to the extent of making no player that will even play DVD-A, and no audio discs exept CD and SACD. I do not think it is unreasonable to suggest their goal is not, in fact, customer choice, based on confidence in a better product, and willingness to invest in it.

It does seem like history repeating itself.

I am back with stereo for a while, being in transit. I have even begun to wonder about DVD-A, which, as you know, I have been warmly recommending, but I have not heard it for a month or so. I do recall improved detail and resolution, and suspect that properly set-up playback of good multichannel recordings is a big part of it. But there is little or no consumer take-up. Certainly SACD discs now outnumber DVD-A discs in big record stores, but there are still very few SACDs. I am even suspicious about why the NAD T533 does not have a DTS decoder; it would have cost very little to incoporate one. I think I need to take a break from all this!

Also in March HiFi News is an item on a new NAD audio network server. That is an interesting development. Onirix is correct in saying there is not much Apple iTunes plus AIrport Express will not do. Except play SACD, and DVD-A. I have searched in vain for more info on the NAD server. I cannot find anything on the NAD site on this.

Being mostly interested in listening to music, I am very much inclined to improve my stereo system, and wait and see before investing any more in multi-channel formats. I am sure many others feel this way. And this is largely why we have not had surround-sound audio for the last thirty years: there was never a standard format. I still think is a shame that Sony-Philips did not back DVD-A; it was technically a natural development of their own CD format. And I still think the copy-protection question is the most likely explanation.
 

Gold Member
Username: Myrantz

Post Number: 1364
Registered: Aug-04
John A

I think the difference between SACD (stereo) and CD is like chalk and cheese (ie sacd is wonderful by comparison) with the few exceptions of very badly engineered DSD recordings or perhaps when the CD mix comes from a DSD master or re-master - for example: on several new (recent ecordings) SACD's the CD mixes are excellent and come very close to the two channel SACD but listening critically will make up your mind as the resolution becomes apparent in those areas where the musicians begin to work for their money.

But, for me it is the surround that really opens everything up - for those that can't get that I have sympathy and I am not being facetious here. I really do believe it's the source makes the difference as do the speakers and what's in between it all.

I read a review (I have said these mean little to me but...) about the DVD 2900 and I'll give you the link - it may help to explain my statement which includes my feelings about DVD-A as well.

Read the "Audio" section of the review in particular.

http://www.hifichoice.co.uk/review_print.asp?ID=2749

The hi-res formats are winners as far as I am concerned and yes, it will take time to catch on, but catch on it will as long as enough people move to HT or give it a fair go.

I am in a very musical place at present and I/we enjoy it all enough not to be wanting.


 

New member
Username: Ipsofacto

New Delhi, Delhi India

Post Number: 3
Registered: Jan-05
Can someone tell me how pure SACDs can be made of compositions like the Szell- Mozart symphonies recorded a dozen or more years ago? I agree with many members that this just a way of (temporarily) blocking ripping or copying these classic performances.

I suppose the same holds for DVD-A and this new fangled HDCD - they are all double-layered disks, introducing a physical blockade to copying via the computer.

I remember at the start of the home PC, a laser-hole was dug into the 5-1/4-in floppies to prevent copying. Has anything changed?

 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2790
Registered: Dec-03
Venkata,

The original master recordings may well have been analogue, still the reference. Digital recording came in the early 1980s.

If you are into classical, there is a company Nimbus who were making four-channel ambisonic recordings 25 years ago and now are now producing them on DVD-A. They were early adopters for CD.

It is not all hopeless. But I agree the copy protection issue is now the main feature. That is all there is to HDCD, I think.
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 331
Registered: Jun-04
The idea is to recuperate the old analogue master tapes and digitalize the music into a format with much higher resolution than CD. Whether industry do this mainly to impose a new copy protection or not, we get something that some of us enjoy a lot more than CD audio.

Nothing has changed since the stone age. We humans are quite propense to maximizing benefits of our efforts. When we do that, we sometimes get into disputes over moral and ethics with others who wish to minimizing costs to obtain things.

IMO just a matter of proportions. In the digital age we can produce nearly perfect copies at home. That was never possible with vinyl, so our piracy on cassettes wasn't such a big threat.

Cheers
AL
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 332
Registered: Jun-04
Hi John, long time no seen
 

Gold Member
Username: John_a

Post Number: 2793
Registered: Dec-03
Hi Arnold!

I agree with you. However, it is the hidden costs and benfits, and to whom they accrue, that are taking a new lease of life in the digital age. Things are so effortlessly hidden, or encrypted. Consider "firmware" which I think is just software that has to be protected so the consumer has no access to it. There was no analogue equivalent of that, or at least I cannot think of one.
 

Silver Member
Username: Arnold_layne

MadridSpain

Post Number: 333
Registered: Jun-04
A classic case of copy protection: the secrecy around Coca-Cola's ingredients. But it's true the phenomenon may be more prominent in the digital age. No surprise, when intellectual propriety becomes the dominating investment cost.

Cheers
AL
 

New member
Username: Ipsofacto

New Delhi, Delhi India

Post Number: 4
Registered: Jan-05
About 'ripping' copy-protected stuff, it should be posible to record on, say, reel tape recorders, the audio outputs (if still there!) on the SACD and DVD-A players. I dont have either of the latter and so cannot try it out by hypothecating here. But most A/V digital receivers appear to have audio outputs. I know reel recorders cost the earth but the technicality could hold. Cheers.
 

JJaudio
Unregistered guest
Hi all. This is what I do. I hope it will be helpful. Take the DVD-A or SACD player and use the two channel analog Hi resolution RCA outputs to your firewire, or USB audio interface into your computer. Note: use Hi quality Left, Right Channel Cables!!!... unless its for mp3 play back witch has no fidelity any way! You need to play your live streaming audio out of the player and into your audio hardware interface that is connected to your computer by USB or firewire connection. Bring it into a Band like live recording software such as (GarageBand) software by apple. which doesn't cost much. Realize - the better the interface hard ware and recording software, the better the analog to digital converters will be. The higher the bit rates are that you use for recording, the better the sound. It is not perfect but it works well. JJ
 

William B.
Unregistered guest
Hi,

I've used a rather simple solution to copy Vinyl, DVD-A, SACD, and concert video DVDs to my iBook for transfer to my iPod. I bought an Edirol UA-1X USB Audio interface for about 60 bucks. It has RCA stereo inputs and outputs. I connected a monster cable from the MD/CDR line out on my receiver to the input on the Edirol UA-1X. I use a Shareware program called Sound Studio to record the audio in real time. Sound Studio records in AIFF, which of course can be converted to AAC or MP3 with iTunes. It works well, but it is time consuming. In addition to recording in real time, I then have to break the sound recording int tracks and name them manually in iTunes. I just try to think of it as another audio-related hobby.



Will
 

New member
Username: Fierce_hope

MelbourneAustralia

Post Number: 1
Registered: May-05
Hi
I've only just placed my first dvd-a order so I haven't been able to test this yet. Copy protection may still be an issue, but when I rip dvd-v's using Mac the Ripper in OS X, it copies exactly what's on the disc including the empty AUDIO_TS file. Does anyone have any idea if this will work? Thanks.
 

Jamie32
Unregistered guest
I also am searching for a way to rip dts audio cd's. I want to take tracks from several disc & compile a few compilations of just the songs I really like ... Jamie
 

Gold Member
Username: Myrantz

The Land Dow...

Post Number: 2171
Registered: Aug-04
http://www.highfidelityreview.com/news/news.asp?newsnumber=14550899
 

New member
Username: Elcoh

Post Number: 1
Registered: Nov-05
have an audio-cd burner hooked up to my stereo so I just made a copy of my sacd cd (beggars banquet,great cd)onto a blank audio cd. The copy I made went right into my computer and itunes .No problems,
 

Bronze Member
Username: Dobyblue

St. Catharines, Ontario Canada

Post Number: 15
Registered: Oct-05
You can rip DTS Cd's as .wav files. They retain all the information regardless of whether your PC can recognise a DTS track or not. As long as the player you use can decode DTS, you're fine.

As for the person that said they're ripping their DVD-A into .ac3 files - you're ripping the DVD-V portion of the DVD-A, not the actual lossless high resolution tracks. You're getting the Dolby Digital portion - there's a big difference in bit rate.
 

Unregistered guest
It's soooo easy to copy a SA-CD or DVD-A (albeit in normal CD quality)! Simply connect the L and R cinch "out"plugs to the same 'in' plugs on a standard audio CD recorder and make a normal recording on a standard Audio-CD (or RW). Then use this disk (once it has been finalised) to rip on your computer or whatever you fancy. Always works!
 

New member
Username: Mukha

Post Number: 1
Registered: Jun-07
I imagine the only way or perhaps just the easiest way to get the higher quality encoding off an SACD is to download a copy off the label's site. A few label's have started providing them (see Linn Records catalogue here: http://www.linnrecords.com/catalogue.aspx?format=studio)

You'll have to keep in mind that whatever you choose to play these with might not support the higher bit word length/sampling rate that these formats are encoded in.

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