Parametric EQ

 

New member
Username: W00b

Post Number: 5
Registered: Mar-05
So let me get this straight.. a parametric EQ lets you set how many bands? like if i wanted 9 bands i could set it to 9 bands, and match the settings with my akai EA-A2 equalizer at home? the 9 bands are 63, 125, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 8000, and 16000. each band has the setting of -12 to 12.. my settings are as follows: +10, +4, -4, -8, -4, 0, +4, +8, +10. could i set a parametric EQ to match each of these? if so, that is so cool! thanks for all who answer
 

Gold Member
Username: Glasswolf

NorthWest, Michigan USA

Post Number: 7522
Registered: Dec-03
a parametric EQ can have any number of bands. I've seen anything from two to over thirty bands on one.

parametrics let you dial in the exact frequency, slope (Q), and cut/boost.
octave, 1/2 and 1/3 octave EQs have fixed frequencies and slopes, but the cut/boost is variable
 

Silver Member
Username: Fishy

Tamarac Ft.Laud, FL USA

Post Number: 796
Registered: Sep-04
I'm thinking about upgrading my head unit to either another Alpine(9835,9833 or 9855) or possibly one of the the upper end Eclipse models that have time alignment(need help on my imaging). I noticed that both brands have onboard "parametric" EQ's.

My question is whether these are "true" parametric EQ's which allow for dialing in different Q's or are they of the "paragraphic" or "quasi-parametric" variety with fixed or boost dependent quality factors like these SS X0's:

http://www.soundstream.com/sub/products_processors.html

I don't have an RTA, am not prepared to do any serious tweaking yet, and was mainly looking to upgrade for the time alignment features so this isn't that critical to me at the moment. Was just curious at how useful these h/u's EQ's might be in the future.

thanks

-Fishy

 

Bronze Member
Username: Muddy

Post Number: 41
Registered: Jun-06
parametric eq are pretty cool i used to have one
 

Silver Member
Username: Makmillion

United States

Post Number: 154
Registered: Apr-06
what's the difference between a parametric eq and a graphic eq? I thought graphic was better but now I'm not sure.

My avh-p5700dvd has a 3band parametric and my deh-p860mp has a 13 band graphic...
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Wisteria, Lane USA

Post Number: 11514
Registered: Dec-03
parametric offers variable frequency, Q, and boost/cut.
graphic only offers variable cut/boost.
a graphic is for casual tweaking at the dash. parametrics are for set and forget system tuning for competition.
 

Silver Member
Username: Makmillion

United States

Post Number: 160
Registered: Apr-06
how would a 3 band parametric stand up to a 13 band graphic?
 

Gold Member
Username: Mixneffect

Orangevale, Ca. USA

Post Number: 1065
Registered: Apr-05
Dustin,

Looking at your EQ settings, it seems that you have a "concave" pattern to your spectrum.

Just thought that I would add that if you want a "concave" pattern, then just use a loudness button feature. Thats exactly what a loudness button does. It boosts the low, cuts the mids, and boosts the highs.

Heres a hint:

Use the EQ to "Cut" not boost.

Cutting allows the amp not to overwork, which may lead to clipping.

Boosting more than 3bds, you actrually take half the power away from other frequencies.

Finally, when EQ(ing), you may not want to fluctuate more than 2 dBs (+ or -). Anything outside these guides will throw things out of phase, and really take away from the integrity of the original recording.

I know, a lot of people like heavy bass, no miods, and lots of highs, just because they think it sounds better. Most recordings are garbage, so I can relate, but looking at it from a functional angle, you may want to get a better designed setup.

Designed as in;

Subs, mids, and highs that are compatible with each other, so that you do not have to boost or cut frequencies more than 2 dBs (+ or -).

Just my .02
 

Bronze Member
Username: Dwight11

Post Number: 17
Registered: Aug-06
yo
 

Gold Member
Username: Illuminator

USA

Post Number: 4071
Registered: Apr-05
Dwight: Stop spamming.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Wisteria, Lane USA

Post Number: 11549
Registered: Dec-03
mix, fwiw, that concave curve is called an "inver bell curve" and is common (and typical of a loudness button) because it compensates for A weighting, to make up for the natural inadequacies of human hearing. we're natrually more sensitive at the midrange band, than we are at high or low audible frequencies.
good advice though. just adding two cents.
 

Bronze Member
Username: Bobimpact

Danbury, CT US

Post Number: 43
Registered: May-06
Glass, to add to that, many albums are recorded using an inner bell that already compensates for the Equal Loudness Contour. This coupled with an inner bell EQ can color the track tremendously. Because instuments are "located" on a track by phasing them, large swings in EQ settings can disrupt the overall phasing of the audio. Most people do not realize that by boosting the low end you may be moving the phase alignment of a speaker (similar to physically moving the speaker backward or forward.) It's worth noting that that disruption is rarely anywhere near inversion (180.) I love phase talk at 2:40 in the morning.
 

Gold Member
Username: Basshead86

Google is your Friend, FL

Post Number: 4979
Registered: Aug-05
^lol^

bob is the man....come down to ocala and TA and EQ my system.:-)
 

Bronze Member
Username: Bobimpact

Danbury, CT US

Post Number: 57
Registered: May-06
I should mention here that I do agree with Mix's statement of using an EQ to cut, in a sense, but a better step if you want to really dig into a system is to get a good EQ (I love my PXA-H701) and an RTA meter, flatten your frequency response, and then put whatever curve you want into the mix. Usually if you want an inverted bell you end up pretty close to flat by the time you're done. Remember, Time Alignment and massive EQ swings (+-6dB) are symptoms of poor system design or location.

That being said, most of the past six posts refer only to some of the more "particular" listeners. :-)
 

Gold Member
Username: Basshead86

Google is your Friend, FL

Post Number: 4991
Registered: Aug-05
yeah. i am not picky as to where the soundstage is persay...as long as it is somewhere in the fornt of the car. lol

i TA'd my system once...i didn't like it.
but i used the Auto TA feature with the Pioneer Mic. so go figure. lol
 

Bronze Member
Username: Bobimpact

Danbury, CT US

Post Number: 58
Registered: May-06
I've TA'd most of the cars I've owned and have gotten great results from it, but only for me, the poor sap in the passenger seat almost always feels ill when sitting in a car that has bee "properly" TA'd to the driver's seat. Most often it's better to TA to the front as you said (screw the passengers in the back, there's a reason their not riding shotgun.)
 

Gold Member
Username: Basshead86

Google is your Friend, FL

Post Number: 4997
Registered: Aug-05
i use my back seat as my trunk sometimes....clothes(clean btw.) and school books. lol
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Wisteria, Lane USA

Post Number: 11609
Registered: Dec-03
the 701 is nice. I was using the CDA-7909 nd PXA-H900 myself.
just moved to the Pioneer premier DEX-P9 and DEQ-P6 units instead, but both are great products. Having a digital T/A and parametric EQ, along with pink noise generator and positional mic do wonders for setting up a system and avoiding a lot of phase issues.
signal path length is as important as absolute phase though.

PS, I made a typo. I meant "Inverse bell curve" above.
 

Silver Member
Username: Bobimpact

Danbury, CT US

Post Number: 149
Registered: May-06
GlassWolf, you RULE.

Tells you how much I trust your opinion that I'll carry a typo over. :-) I've got a customer who wants the DEX/DEQ combo, we'll see, I've heard it's jaw dropping.

I completely agree that path length is important, as is the acoustic enviornment of the vehicle (at least speaker locations, preferably interior shape, seating covers, etc.) should be considered in extreme audiophile setups, as well as the (to steal Bose's terminology) psycho accoustic factors (phase inversion/coupling locations, etc.) With extreme audiophile customers (see my new thread) these little things can sink an install.


Wow this got off topic...

At least we got through this thread without a mention of "Fletcher-Munson." Ah, crap.
 

Platinum Member
Username: Glasswolf

Wisteria, Lane USA

Post Number: 11644
Registered: Dec-03
sound deadening the car will help out some too with that customer. it'll reduce resonance that may be causing some troubles in addition to the aforementioned phase issue.
if he hasn't already done it, get some second skin mat (damplifier pro) and do the doors at least, kicks, etc.. if he wants it done right, do the floors and ceiling too, along with the trunk, just to keep the power inside the car.
did you try kickpods for speaker location as well when you worked on positioning without cutting up doors?

PS the P9 combo is second to none for it's EQ and XO, and with the K grade burr brown DACs and all, it's an astounding SQ deck.
If your customer's got the two grand to drop on it, go for it
(god I miss that pioneer discount from when I worked in a shop. I'd kill to get that much off that combo right now)
 

New member
Username: Jbellego

Post Number: 1
Registered: Apr-07
I wonder if anyone can tell me where to get microphone to carry out auto TA and EQ on a Pioneer AVH-P7550DVD. I lost the one that came with the unit. tks.

Add Your Message Here

Bold text Italics Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image Add a YouTube Video
Need to Register?
Forgot Password?
Enable HTML code in message
   
Jump to: Home Audio Forum | Home Video Forum | Home Theater Forum | Car Audio Forum